TNJ is Starting a Weekly Column on Tr...

TNJ is Starting a Weekly Column on Traffic and Transportation

Posted in the Delaware Forum

“Let's Have a Good Discussion!”

Since: May 08

DNFTT

#1 Dec 8, 2011
Just an FYI from a note in TNJ in case posters might wish to raise issues for coverage--

"Delaware Traffic is a new weekly column about traffic and transportation issues affecting daily life in the First State. If you have an issue you would like covered, email Melissa Nann Burke at mburke@delawareonline.com. "

Since: Nov 11

Wilmington

#2 Dec 8, 2011
Get Serious wrote:
Just an FYI from a note in TNJ in case posters might wish to raise issues for coverage--
"Delaware Traffic is a new weekly column about traffic and transportation issues affecting daily life in the First State. If you have an issue you would like covered, email Melissa Nann Burke at mburke@delawareonline.com. "
They should have named it Delaware Gridlock. Too late, the state is trashed.

“Let's Have a Good Discussion!”

Since: May 08

DNFTT

#3 Dec 8, 2011
exitde wrote:
<quoted text>
They should have named it Delaware Gridlock. Too late, the state is trashed.
I hear ya. What makes me crazy about Delaware on this topic is the completely indefensible level of crony/waste/payola DelDot expenditures.

I've looked at it on a per capita basis using census expenditure and population statistics and it's indefensible. When I factor in the particulars of the Delaware road system, the picture looks even worse. It's almost the tiniest state from a land size perspective and thus the costs related to connecting vast expanses are not a factor. The land is essentially flat so there's no big topographical issues providing justification for higher DOT expense levels. Further, the needed growth is relatively recent and unrelated to ancient city, road and building arrangements which also can add to the per capita expense levels when those challenges have to be accommodated in DOT activities.

So we have what should be a relatively trivial job from a design, engineering and maintenance perspective and they have completely indefensible cost levels. Add to that the fact that the corrupt pols refuse to allocate the appropriate costs to the developers who caused most of the expense which is simply dumped on the taxpayers and THAT'S a combo that should have had the voters screaming for accountability and reform for decades.

That said, having lived on Manhattan, Long Island and in Tokyo, I am sometimes a bit amused at what folks here call gridlock. Don't get me wrong, I think people should insist that Delaware not allow that level of quality of life problem... though I am pessimistic since it seems clear that no one other than those in the pol/crony circle of denial and corruption matters in their self-serving and cost-shifting decision making.

Since: Nov 11

Wilmington

#4 Dec 9, 2011
Get Serious wrote:
<quoted text>
I hear ya. What makes me crazy about Delaware on this topic is the completely indefensible level of crony/waste/payola DelDot expenditures.
I've looked at it on a per capita basis using census expenditure and population statistics and it's indefensible. When I factor in the particulars of the Delaware road system, the picture looks even worse. It's almost the tiniest state from a land size perspective and thus the costs related to connecting vast expanses are not a factor. The land is essentially flat so there's no big topographical issues providing justification for higher DOT expense levels. Further, the needed growth is relatively recent and unrelated to ancient city, road and building arrangements which also can add to the per capita expense levels when those challenges have to be accommodated in DOT activities.
So we have what should be a relatively trivial job from a design, engineering and maintenance perspective and they have completely indefensible cost levels. Add to that the fact that the corrupt pols refuse to allocate the appropriate costs to the developers who caused most of the expense which is simply dumped on the taxpayers and THAT'S a combo that should have had the voters screaming for accountability and reform for decades.
That said, having lived on Manhattan, Long Island and in Tokyo, I am sometimes a bit amused at what folks here call gridlock. Don't get me wrong, I think people should insist that Delaware not allow that level of quality of life problem... though I am pessimistic since it seems clear that no one other than those in the pol/crony circle of denial and corruption matters in their self-serving and cost-shifting decision making.
What happened in Delaware is we are now basically a flow through traffic state and shopping accommodation, the traffic is not primarily Delaware residents. We have tremendous traffic on I-95 making local use impractical. We have huge four and six lane roads to do nothing but move people to the beach or Dover for the track or a shopping area, and they can't handle the traffic. We are plowed under with shopping malls and outlet stores so out of state people beating their state tax shop here. The gross receipts tax WAS supposed to offset a lot of the cost, but that was some pipe dream from thirty or so years ago. The state has an abysmal record of planning roads and traffic control devices. Look at the Christiana Mall interchange, Prices Corner interchange (been screwed up since J.T. Ward got thrown off the job in the 70's) look at I-95 north on to Rt. 202, Rt.1 from Lewes south, Rt. 13 both ways in New Castle, from one end of the state to another roads and connecters were scabbed together with no future plans taken into consideration. Big Ruth and the Indian River Bridge disaster, and on and on. Former two way road intersections have had the shoulders converted into turn and traffic lanes, five lanes squeezed into where there two originally. We are also ODing on traffic lights and left turn signals. Intersections are now avoided throwing traffic onto other roads and through developments. Too many roads and interchanges and curb rights and land deals have favors tied to them, it's obvious. The Justices were the mother load of misconduct in the state and NCC. This didn't happen over night, the "good 'ol boys" club destroyed this state.

“Let's Have a Good Discussion!”

Since: May 08

DNFTT

#5 Dec 9, 2011
exitde wrote:
<quoted text>
What happened in Delaware is we are now basically a flow through traffic state and shopping accommodation, the traffic is not primarily Delaware residents. We have tremendous traffic on I-95 making local use impractical. We have huge four and six lane roads to do nothing but move people to the beach or Dover for the track or a shopping area, and they can't handle the traffic. We are plowed under with shopping malls and outlet stores so out of state people beating their state tax shop here. The gross receipts tax WAS supposed to offset a lot of the cost, but that was some pipe dream from thirty or so years ago. The state has an abysmal record of planning roads and traffic control devices. Look at the Christiana Mall interchange, Prices Corner interchange (been screwed up since J.T. Ward got thrown off the job in the 70's) look at I-95 north on to Rt. 202, Rt.1 from Lewes south, Rt. 13 both ways in New Castle, from one end of the state to another roads and connecters were scabbed together with no future plans taken into consideration. Big Ruth and the Indian River Bridge disaster, and on and on. Former two way road intersections have had the shoulders converted into turn and traffic lanes, five lanes squeezed into where there two originally. We are also ODing on traffic lights and left turn signals. Intersections are now avoided throwing traffic onto other roads and through developments. Too many roads and interchanges and curb rights and land deals have favors tied to them, it's obvious. The Justices were the mother load of misconduct in the state and NCC. This didn't happen over night, the "good 'ol boys" club destroyed this state.
I totally agree. It has blown my mind how simple traffic design principles seem to be completely unknown in this state. For all the money spent, we might as well have let some four year olds with a box of crayons map out the road system. The so-called interchanges are a joke and don't get me started on the inane and dysfunctional loop-de-loops some moron thought were needed in the new Middletown projects. I also always enjoy the completely dysfunctional Rt 273 segment south of Rt 40 which closes down one of 2 lanes for a length of about 15 feet and then immediately re-establishes it. The waste and idiocy is beyond excuse-- and then just add in the land fraud deals!! How are they not all in jail?

btw-- your perspective and history summary were very interesting. Maybe you should send that info to the email for the new TNJ column and see if they would do a piece focusing on that?

“Santa's Coming!”

Since: Nov 11

Centreville, DE

#6 Dec 9, 2011
They should just put up a sign that says "Don't even try, you can't get there from here!"
lol - what on earth get's into their heads to start highway and road projects around holidays? Today, I only had to get into Greenville, stop at 3 places to get a few gifts and as I came down the road at the 4 way stop at Montchanin and Thompson Bridge Rd., Thompson Bridge Rd. was closed and as I found out when I made the right turn to continue on Montchanin, it was blocked for about a mile waiting on tree trimming, this was around noon, just as a lot of people were trying to get to lunch or Christmas lunches or just to Janssen's and we sat and sat, finally we got through and I noticed that Hillside Rd. had some sort of construction going on there too. Geeze, someone should tell them that timing is everything.

“Santa's Coming!”

Since: Nov 11

Centreville, DE

#7 Dec 9, 2011
Exit, if you think things are bad now, wait until they build up the corner of Rt. 141 and 48, that will become almost impassable at certain times of the day and our little side roads, with no shoulders to speak of, will have to bear the traffic of those just trying to find an alternate way. Even I can spell nightmare!

Since: Nov 11

Wilmington

#8 Dec 9, 2011
PNGreen wrote:
Exit, if you think things are bad now, wait until they build up the corner of Rt. 141 and 48, that will become almost impassable at certain times of the day and our little side roads, with no shoulders to speak of, will have to bear the traffic of those just trying to find an alternate way. Even I can spell nightmare!
There is nowhere to put the traffic when they close a road or work on a road like 48 or 141. We just went through the spring, summer and fall of almost every road in Brandywine Hundred being worked on, Foulk Rd was by far the poster child for poor planning for a construction job.

Since: Nov 11

Wilmington

#9 Dec 9, 2011
PNGreen wrote:
They should just put up a sign that says "Don't even try, you can't get there from here!"
lol - what on earth get's into their heads to start highway and road projects around holidays? Today, I only had to get into Greenville, stop at 3 places to get a few gifts and as I came down the road at the 4 way stop at Montchanin and Thompson Bridge Rd., Thompson Bridge Rd. was closed and as I found out when I made the right turn to continue on Montchanin, it was blocked for about a mile waiting on tree trimming, this was around noon, just as a lot of people were trying to get to lunch or Christmas lunches or just to Janssen's and we sat and sat, finally we got through and I noticed that Hillside Rd. had some sort of construction going on there too. Geeze, someone should tell them that timing is everything.
I think there was a pole down and wires down today down by Monchanin Rd. But they do decide to work on roads where two or three alternates are also closed. Zero planning.

“Santa's Coming!”

Since: Nov 11

Centreville, DE

#10 Dec 9, 2011
exitde wrote:
<quoted text>
I think there was a pole down and wires down today down by Monchanin Rd. But they do decide to work on roads where two or three alternates are also closed. Zero planning.
How do you know all this stuff? I live there and had no clue! LOL, we really are the last to know. RE: your area, tell me about it, I had to take my husband for PT 3 times a week over there,in the first 4 months or so of this year, it was like trying to thread a needle with a car!

Since: Nov 11

Wilmington

#11 Dec 10, 2011
PNGreen wrote:
<quoted text>
How do you know all this stuff? I live there and had no clue! LOL, we really are the last to know. RE: your area, tell me about it, I had to take my husband for PT 3 times a week over there,in the first 4 months or so of this year, it was like trying to thread a needle with a car!
How do I know about the stuff? I hear / see reports or actually see it. Saw two yesterday, Silverside Rd was closed at I-95 for a head on, and one lane of Philadelphia Pike was closed for a car that rear ended a bus. Things are better now around where I live, most of the construction is complete., but for six months it wasn't worth trying to even go anywhere it was so bad.
Dunno

Tuscaloosa, AL

#12 Dec 19, 2011
Speaking of the Prices Corner interchange...can anyone point me in the direction of finding old pics b4 the interchange was built. I grew up there in the 60's and 70's and would like to really see any of the old photos.

I've googled several different entries but no luck.

Thanks

“Come Home America!”

Since: Nov 11

Claymont, Delaware 19809

#13 Dec 19, 2011
@Get Serious, exitde, Golden Horseshoe, "I've looked at it on a per capita basis using census expenditure and population statistics and it's indefensible. When I factor in the particulars of the Delaware road system, the picture looks even worse" "What happened in Delaware" "Exit, if you think things are bad now, wait until they build up the corner of Rt. 141 " "We just went through the spring, summer and fall of almost every road in Brandywine Hundred being worked on, Foulk Rd was by far the poster child for poor planning for a construction job." You are all wrong and too addled to remember that it wasn't poor planning, or scheduling , but the years of neglect of needed upkeep and repairs to national infrastructure because funding was being siphoned off to fight two unnecessary wars Iraq and Afghanistan , a bail-out of the airlines after 9/11 and a nebulous war on terrorism by a Bush Administration. On Daily Kos, Meteor Blades notes that repairing our infrastructure “ought to be a no-brainer.”

"It’s understandable in impoverished Chad or Haiti or East Timor or the back country of the People’s Republic of China. But there is no excuse for lethal tumbledown infrastructure in this country. Congress gave Mister Bush $1.35 trillion in tax cuts. Congress has appropriated $600 billion (so far, with more to come) for a war that should never have happened. Congress enables the military-industrial complex to vacuum up additional hundreds of billions in taxpayer dollars annually.

ASCE’s “2005 Report Card for America’s Infrastructure” gave the nation a “D.” The group estimated that a $1.6 trillion investment over the next five years is needed to fix these problems and rebuild America. The report is both a damning indictment of neglect and a recipe for disaster:

Consider just a few of these facts from the ASCE:

27.1 percent of the nation’s 590,750 bridges were rated structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. It will cost $9 billion a year for 20 years to eliminate all bridge deficiencies.

Poor road conditions cost U.S. motorists $54 billion a year in repairs and operating costs, and congestion on the nation’s roadways costs drivers $63 billion a year. However, the $59 billion spent annually is well below the $94 billion needed each year to improve transportation infrastructure.

Limited rail capacity has created significant chokepoints and delays. However, freight rail is expected to increase at least 50 percent by 2020. In addition, intercity passenger and commuter rail service is recognized as a good investment. Each year,$12 billion to $13 billion is needed to maintain existing rail infrastructure and expand for future growth.

Waterways move large volumes of bulk commodities at a fraction of the cost of rail or trucks, but of the 257 locks on 12,000 miles of inland waterways operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, nearly 50 percent are functionally obsolete. By 2020 this will rise to 80 percent.

Federal funding for drinking water and wastewater systems remains at $850 million annually, less than 10 percent of the total national requirement. Aging systems discharge billions of gallons of untreated sewage into U.S. surface waters each year. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that $390 billion will be needed over the next 20 years to adequately address these problems.

Between 1998 and 2005, the number of unsafe dams rose by 33 percent to more than 3,500. It will take $10.1 billion over the next 12 years to address all critical nonfederal dams. By 2005, there were more than 11,000 high-hazard-potential dams—dams whose failure would cause loss of human life."
Anyone still think that President Obama's Economic Recovery Act(Stimulus) was not a crucial response to a national emergency? President Obama is undoubtedly a America Firster in bringing America's dollars and manpower home from foreign wars and hasty ,slipshod 'nation-building' to take care of America.

“Come Home America!”

Since: Nov 11

Claymont, Delaware 19809

#14 Dec 19, 2011
@Get Serious, exitde, Golden Horseshoe, "I've looked at it on a per capita basis using census expenditure and population statistics and it's indefensible. When I factor in the particulars of the Delaware road system, the picture looks even worse" "What happened in Delaware" "Exit, if you think things are bad now, wait until they build up the corner of Rt. 141 " "We just went through the spring, summer and fall of almost every road in Brandywine Hundred being worked on, Foulk Rd was by far the poster child for poor planning for a construction job."

You are all wrong and too addled to remember that it wasn't poor planning, or scheduling , but the years of neglect of needed upkeep and repairs to national infrastructure because funding was being siphoned off to fight two unnecessary wars in Iraq and Afghanistan , a bail-out of the airlines after 9/11 and a nebulous war on terrorism by a war mongering Bush Administration. On Daily Kos, Meteor Blades notes that repairing our infrastructure “ought to be a no-brainer.”
"It’s understandable in impoverished Chad or Haiti or East Timor or the back country of the People’s Republic of China. But there is no excuse for lethal tumbledown infrastructure in this country. Congress gave Mister Bush $1.35 trillion in tax cuts. Congress has appropriated $600 billion (so far, with more to come) for a war that should never have happened. Congress enables the military-industrial complex to vacuum up additional hundreds of billions in taxpayer dollars annually.
ASCE’s “2005 Report Card for America’s Infrastructure” gave the nation a “D.” The group estimated that a $1.6 trillion investment over the next five years is needed to fix these problems and rebuild America. The report is both a damning indictment of neglect and a recipe for disaster:
Consider just a few of these facts from the ASCE:
27.1 percent of the nation’s 590,750 bridges were rated structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. It will cost $9 billion a year for 20 years to eliminate all bridge deficiencies.
Poor road conditions cost U.S. motorists $54 billion a year in repairs and operating costs, and congestion on the nation’s roadways costs drivers $63 billion a year. However, the $59 billion spent annually is well below the $94 billion needed each year to improve transportation infrastructure.
Limited rail capacity has created significant chokepoints and delays. However, freight rail is expected to increase at least 50 percent by 2020. In addition, intercity passenger and commuter rail service is recognized as a good investment. Each year,$12 billion to $13 billion is needed to maintain existing rail infrastructure and expand for future growth.
Waterways move large volumes of bulk commodities at a fraction of the cost of rail or trucks, but of the 257 locks on 12,000 miles of inland waterways operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, nearly 50 percent are functionally obsolete. By 2020 this will rise to 80 percent.
Federal funding for drinking water and wastewater systems remains at $850 million annually, less than 10 percent of the total national requirement. Aging systems discharge billions of gallons of untreated sewage into U.S. surface waters each year. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that $390 billion will be needed over the next 20 years to adequately address these problems.
Between 1998 and 2005, the number of unsafe dams rose by 33 percent to more than 3,500. It will take $10.1 billion over the next 12 years to address all critical nonfederal dams. By 2005, there were more than 11,000 high-hazard-potential dams—dams whose failure would cause loss of human life."

Anyone still think that President Obama's Economic Recovery Act(Stimulus) was not a crucial response to a national emergency? President Obama is undoubtedly a America Firster in bringing America's dollars and manpower home from foreign wars and hasty ,slipshod 'nation-building' efforts and to take care of America.

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