Conn. lawmakers approve bill raising ...

Conn. lawmakers approve bill raising minimum wage to $10.10

There are 30 comments on the Fox News story from Mar 27, 2014, titled Conn. lawmakers approve bill raising minimum wage to $10.10. In it, Fox News reports that:

Connecticut lawmakers Wednesday approved raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2017, the highest for any state in the country and the same rate that President Obama wants for the federal minimum wage.

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asdfg

Columbus, OH

#21 Mar 28, 2014
TonyT1961 wrote:
<quoted text>
Right moron. Allow the southern red states to keep wages depressed. That makes sense only to morons like you.
To begin with, the commenter seems to be from Illinois. THAT is NOT a Southern State, so maybe you need a map. If you ever have to work for a minimum wage job because it is all you can find, then you might have some common sense.
Rem223

Essex, CT

#22 Mar 28, 2014
This bill will hurt seniors as prices for everthing will increase, except those Social Security checks which are being cut through smaller cola increases and Medicare cuts by obuma.

I guess theres no such thing a entry level positions in the workplace anymore.
Justin

United States

#23 Mar 28, 2014
I pay a Mexican guy $30 and hour to mow my lawn and other stuff around the house. I'd be willing to pay Conneticut resident with valid SSN $15 an hour for same service, if they can do good enough job and are willing to relocate.

Serious inquiries only.

“JESUS WOULD IMPEACH THE GOP!!!”

Since: May 09

Lake Success, N.Y.

#24 Mar 28, 2014
Chicopee wrote:
<quoted text>
About 7% of all jobs here in Ct. pay minimum wage, which is currently $8.50 hr. Minors and restaurant workers earn less. Most convenience stores, gas stations, fast food restaurants/beverage chains, entry level retail jobs are minimum wage and even union grocery chains only start at 25 cents above minimum wage.
The national average of jobs recovered since 2008 is 63%, but here in Ct. it's only at 43%, since Ct. is a very unfriendly state to do business in between states regs and high corporate taxes. This is most definitely going to affect low wage jobs numbers.
Doing some business with a few Ct. companies doesn't qualify you to know what our situation here in Ct. is. This state is a mess, with the poorest credit rating of all states, stagnant job creation, some of the highest taxes nationwide, high gas prices, high insurance rates, medical costs and the highest rate of retirees who have to leave the state to survive nationwide. And we democrats can't wait to get our current governor the hell out of the governors mansion this November, even if we have to vote republican to do it. This guy's been an absolute disaster.
Listen, I'm not here to duel with you. You stated, as I did, that a mere 7% of jobs in CT. are minimum wage - which means those sector of jobs overall will not have a negative impact on hiring in a state that already has a minimum wage of $8.50 per hr.

My mention of three specific companies does not encompass the other 123 companies I conduct business with on an almost daily basis as well.

You also have in CT. one of the largest concentrations of skilled talented labor pools the country has to offer.

Most retirees in the North East leave when that time arises anyway. As they do in virtually all North East states. Your situation is not unique sir.

Your gas taxes are high, but your roads are in great shape - my personal favorite is RT. 15 - a beautiful drive. So your gas taxes are being spent wisely it would seem. I wish the roads were maintained in New York as well. And Jersey has the worst roads in the country, barring Cleveland. So low gas taxes there meant no money in the coffers to rebuild infrastructure, so Christie diverted federal funds to build the ARC tunnel into the infrastructure coffers;

"Gov. Christie plans to use ARC tunnel money to pay for repairs to N.J. bridges, roads"

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2011/01/gov_...

“JESUS WOULD IMPEACH THE GOP!!!”

Since: May 09

Lake Success, N.Y.

#25 Mar 28, 2014
Chicopee wrote:
<quoted text>
Average rental price, SC:$611 (2 bdrm)
Average rental price, CT.$1006.00 (I bdrm)
Median home price, SC $126,000
Median home price, CT $234, 900
Fuel prices SC $3.221
Fuel prices, CT $3.765
Property taxes, SC $0.5% home value
Property taxes, CT 1.63% home value
Southern states are considerably cheaper places to live than northern states, particularly New England. The wages reflect the cost of living.
Some southern states have the highest rates of high school drop outs and out of wedlock births. This has more to do with the high rates of families requiring government assistance and the lack of insurance than the wages do.
Lack of insurance due to unaffordability / a higher minimum wage could reverse that trend.

As to your price index, I can buy a home in S.C. further inland for less than $100,000.00. I am currently in negotiations for a second condo, on the water, 10 miles from Myrtle Beach.

$153,000.00 / 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 9th floor, facing the ocean. And yes, property taxes are much less.

But the price of food, clothing, and gas are relatively the same, wherever you go.(Gas prices fluctuate by state).

As to your statement regarding southern states requiring more in federal assistance, do you not think a more robust educational curriculum combined with a higher minimum wage would help to reverse a trend that has been ongoing for over 100 years?
Cujo

Regina, Canada

#26 Mar 28, 2014
Sounds great, but by 2017 the minimum wage should likely be more like $12.00 to keep up. It should be $10.10 now. This really won't help the way of life for minimum wage workers.

Since: Mar 08

Allentown, PA

#27 Mar 29, 2014
TonyT1961 wrote:
<quoted text>
Lack of insurance due to unaffordability / a higher minimum wage could reverse that trend.
As to your price index, I can buy a home in S.C. further inland for less than $100,000.00. I am currently in negotiations for a second condo, on the water, 10 miles from Myrtle Beach.
$153,000.00 / 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 9th floor, facing the ocean. And yes, property taxes are much less.
But the price of food, clothing, and gas are relatively the same, wherever you go.(Gas prices fluctuate by state).
As to your statement regarding southern states requiring more in federal assistance, do you not think a more robust educational curriculum combined with a higher minimum wage would help to reverse a trend that has been ongoing for over 100 years?
The south never had the industrial base the north had. So, the north would have higher wages and a greater talent pool.
.
The south is now starting to attract better paying business and many companies will no longer consider states like California or New York as a place to set up shop.
.
As for minimum wages, the past increases never did much and there is no reason to think the latest will. Costs will rise and in a few years the minimum wage will be seen as too low (again).

“JESUS WOULD IMPEACH THE GOP!!!”

Since: May 09

Lake Success, N.Y.

#28 Mar 29, 2014
LookingToEscape wrote:
<quoted text>
The south never had the industrial base the north had. So, the north would have higher wages and a greater talent pool.
.
The south is now starting to attract better paying business and many companies will no longer consider states like California or New York as a place to set up shop.
.
As for minimum wages, the past increases never did much and there is no reason to think the latest will. Costs will rise and in a few years the minimum wage will be seen as too low (again).
Actually, what the south has never had is the talent pool - they've always had lower taxes, and I've seen many companies go there for this reason, but the skilled labor pool has always been limited, thus the northern states and west coast states have always had incentives for businesses in place to continue training and education to retain this pool.

The jobs there are in primarily in larger scale automotive assembly facilities.

New York actually has zero tax for 10 years incentive programs, NYC has had for almost 2 decades "Empire Free" zoning areas to retain manufacturing, so I would not consider manufacturing in the North East dead - very far from it.

Since: Mar 08

Allentown, PA

#29 Mar 29, 2014
TonyT1961 wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, what the south has never had is the talent pool - they've always had lower taxes, and I've seen many companies go there for this reason, but the skilled labor pool has always been limited, thus the northern states and west coast states have always had incentives for businesses in place to continue training and education to retain this pool.
The jobs there are in primarily in larger scale automotive assembly facilities.
New York actually has zero tax for 10 years incentive programs, NYC has had for almost 2 decades "Empire Free" zoning areas to retain manufacturing, so I would not consider manufacturing in the North East dead - very far from it.
I didn't say dead, I am saying the north and west is no longer the go to places they used to be. For certain high value industries, those areas are still doable but attractive alternatives are available elsewhere.
.
The south is starting to get more high tech and with those jobs opening up, the talent will follow which in turn will create more business which means more jobs.
.
The south just won't be for coon season much longer.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#30 Mar 29, 2014
Cujo wrote:
This really won't help the way of life for minimum wage workers.
Right...

$7.50 gross:$15,600.00
$10.10 gross:$21,008.00

What's $5,000 a year to someone making minimum wage...

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