Officer-Involved Shooting Raises Ques...

Officer-Involved Shooting Raises Questions About Police Training

There are 48 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Jun 7, 2013, titled Officer-Involved Shooting Raises Questions About Police Training. In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

Saturday's officer-involved shooting has raised questions about how police decide to use deadly force.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

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Guardian

Charlottesville, VA

#1 Jun 10, 2013
Both cases, the victim shot was unarmed. Don't overlook that fact in your "in depth" reporting.
EBT Escalade

Charlottesville, VA

#2 Jun 10, 2013
Amy, tell us how the shooting has raised questions? I have seen nothing definitive as of yet to suggest that the shooting was improper. The perpetrator was killed so it looks like the marksmanship portion of the training was effective.
Randal Livingston III

Champlin, MN

#3 Jun 10, 2013
Iit is obvious the police are scared and using the gun first
EBT Escalade

Charlottesville, VA

#4 Jun 10, 2013
Randal Livingston III wrote:
Iit is obvious the police are scared and using the gun first
Oh really? What makes you say that? Check out Gregory Allen Rosson, Jr. is the local court websites and see what you find.

14 cases in the Albemarle general district court website
one in the Charlottesville district court website
2 in the Albemarle circuit court website

You can check the neighboring courts on your own. Although this case has yet to be fully plumbed it is obvious that the deceased is no stranger to vicarious living. Several posts have asserted he was beating a woman when he met his fate. Weapon or not, if a policeman thinks you are in danger of being beaten to death he is required to dispense with your attacker. FBI statistics show that more people get beaten to death every year than are killed by so called semiautomatic assault rifles.
Really

Suitland, MD

#5 Jun 10, 2013
They( criminals ) don't have to be armed for deadly force options. Many factors can lead to that option. Be informed before posting such comments.
Adam

Waynesboro, VA

#6 Jun 10, 2013
Academy directors say officers in training often fail to shoot when they should.<<<

If this is true then the opposite is true.
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#7 Jun 10, 2013
Adam wrote:
Academy directors say officers in training often fail to shoot when they should.<<<
If this is true then the opposite is true.
wait, that doesn't make sense
say what

United States

#8 Jun 10, 2013
huck wrote:
<quoted text>
wait, that doesn't make sense
what he is saying is that, I believe is..... they are HUMAN and to shoot another HUMAN plays a big factor in this... they will set bounderies or imaginary lines after telling the suspect to "halt", a split second decision is made if the suspect crosses that line, or continues doing the violent act.. his demeaner plays a big part in if they get shot or not.. as in self defense,.. me or them... Just sayin..
Who Knows

Faber, VA

#9 Jun 10, 2013
No--NBC29 causes questions to be raised in order to stir up controversy for the sake of ratings and clicks for the advertisers.
Tammy

Cumming, GA

#10 Jun 10, 2013
I'm sorry he should have not been shot I know this young man he was a good person I don't be leave he beat his girl friend I seen him in the store one day and she got so mad that I said hello to him and she hit him in the store so I just don't know You are up there with god now
huck

Charlottesville, VA

#11 Jun 10, 2013
say what wrote:
<quoted text>
what he is saying is that, I believe is..... they are HUMAN and to shoot another HUMAN plays a big factor in this... they will set bounderies or imaginary lines after telling the suspect to "halt", a split second decision is made if the suspect crosses that line, or continues doing the violent act.. his demeaner plays a big part in if they get shot or not.. as in self defense,.. me or them... Just sayin..
ok, thanks, that does help
Adam

Waynesboro, VA

#12 Jun 10, 2013
I thought the thrust of my comment was self evident, but to clarify:

If, in training, there are a certain number of trainees who fail to shoot, then it is statistically reasonable to assume there are a certain number who shoot when they shouldn`t.

The reporter should have immediately asked "How many trainees shoot when they shouldn`t?", inasmuch as that is the crux of the article.

Further, are there those who fail the "shoot or not shoot" portion of the course? If so what is done? Is that trainee "washed out"? Placed on limited duty? Given advanced an intensive instruction?

Just a few, I think, reasonable points to raise.

None of the above diminishes my appreciation for our law enforcement entities; but the questions,I believe, are legitimate.
Concerned

Charlottesville, VA

#13 Jun 10, 2013
EBT Escalade wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh really? What makes you say that? Check out Gregory Allen Rosson, Jr. is the local court websites and see what you find.
14 cases in the Albemarle general district court website
one in the Charlottesville district court website
2 in the Albemarle circuit court website
You can check the neighboring courts on your own. Although this case has yet to be fully plumbed it is obvious that the deceased is no stranger to vicarious living. Several posts have asserted he was beating a woman when he met his fate. Weapon or not, if a policeman thinks you are in danger of being beaten to death he is required to dispense with your attacker. FBI statistics show that more people get beaten to death every year than are killed by so called semiautomatic assault rifles.
A persons court record should not be justification of their death, what kind of analogy is that? Glad you are not a cop!
Concerned

Charlottesville, VA

#14 Jun 10, 2013
If the man was unarmed and still dangerous, what happened to shooting him in a leg or arm to subdue?
pete

Douglasville, GA

#16 Jun 10, 2013
Concerned wrote:
If the man was unarmed and still dangerous, what happened to shooting him in a leg or arm to subdue?
If the officer is justified to pull the trigger, then the shoot justifies deadly force. In police work there is no such thing as shoot to wound or fire warning shots. The dilemma is the officer must decide in a split second, shoot or don't shoot. We have days, weeks, even years to Monday morning quarterback the officer's choice. Thoughts are with all that are involved in this tragedy.
Missy

Charlottesville, VA

#17 Jun 10, 2013
Concerned wrote:
<quoted text>
A persons court record should not be justification of their death, what kind of analogy is that? Glad you are not a cop!
I don't think his record is a justification for shooting. However, his record certainly points towards a propensity for violence and lack of self-control.
RandomThoughts

Atlanta, GA

#18 Jun 10, 2013
Why Thank you Amy Vu.

Its time to address this issue .

The PD are miserable failures at wrongful shootings . Cville and the surrounding areas need a look at .

How many shooting by officers just in the past few years in that area ...

TOO MANY
Thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#19 Jun 10, 2013
18 weeks to train an idiot when and when not to pull a gun. That makes a lot of sense. The training is important, whats more important is screening out possible sociopaths who want to wear a badge. Local pd's do no such screening, no pysch testing, no profiling, nothing, just sign on the dotted line and we'll give you a gun and badge in 18 weeks to hold dominion over the lives of people who for the most part don't trust you, as well they shouldn't. Why are we having problems with cops shooting citizens? Real life ain't no videogame.
George S

Maylene, AL

#20 Jun 10, 2013
Missy wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't think his record is a justification for shooting. However, his record certainly points towards a propensity for violence and lack of self-control.
And the cop who killed him had no knowledge of any of this prior to killing him.

He could have been armed with a wooden leaf rake, a spatula, his wallet, or a bologna sandwich--each of which have been deemed 'deadly weapons' and 'posing a deadly threat' to officers in recent years.

When it appears that a cop may have acted improperly, the news industry runs off to interview anyone who will say he acted properly.
well-

United States

#21 Jun 10, 2013
Tammy wrote:
I'm sorry he should have not been shot I know this young man he was a good person I don't be leave he beat his girl friend I seen him in the store one day and she got so mad that I said hello to him and she hit him in the store so I just don't know You are up there with god now
WOW. SERIOUSLY?

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