Lost snowshoer spends two nights in f...

Lost snowshoer spends two nights in forest

There are 15 comments on the The Santa Fe New Mexican story from Mar 18, 2009, titled Lost snowshoer spends two nights in forest. In it, The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that:

Laura Christensen only expected to be gone about three hours Monday when she snowshoed up Raven's Ridge above the Santa Fe ski basin, so she was wearing light clothing and brought only minimal water and no food.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Santa Fe New Mexican.

Frank V

United States

#1 Mar 19, 2009
Great to hear Laura was found. Kudos to the search and rescue teams that volunteer their time and energy to help find lost people.

All hikers, no matter your experience level, always be prepared, let people know your plans, and ALWAYS carry a map, compass and GPS.

“Liberal Patriot”

Since: Sep 08

Rio Linda, CA

#2 Mar 19, 2009
One real lucky woman. Hope she does ok.
jose publicio

Colorado Springs, CO

#3 Mar 19, 2009
Okay, drop the ipod the next time and enjoy the surroundings. Otherwise stay at home and read/listen to the book.
Hope she reimburses the cost of the rescue.

I doubt it

Since: Nov 08

northern New Mexico

#4 Mar 19, 2009
Every year a "nature lover" gets stranded doing very dumb things, summer or winter. Some die.

The real west isn't your father's Disneyland.

Take remedial Girl Scouting to learn how to be prepared and be safe (and not risk other people who look for you. By the way, whistles are cheap but highly effective.)
JXD

Rio Rancho, NM

#5 Mar 19, 2009
What cost of the rescue? All the S&R are volunteers and the helos are training runs for the NMNG, which are needed to keep their certifications.
FREDTERP

United States

#6 Mar 19, 2009
What book was she listening to. It must have been enthralling? FREDTERP
MarkH

Oakland, CA

#7 Mar 19, 2009
C'mon you heartless twerps, jose publico and mpb2! It's good to hike the mountains, sometimes folks get lost, the rescuers were volunteers, she was saved. It all turns out well, and you want spew blame and ridicule?
True North

Santa Fe, NM

#8 Mar 19, 2009
Hey! Shithappens! I am glad this person doesn't let fear restrain her freedom, or her adventures; anyhow, when your number comes up "WHEN YOU GOTTA GO-YOU GOTTA GO..."
arnulfo

Midland, TX

#9 Mar 19, 2009
well their is one born every day.she should pay the rescue system for that f up
old girl scout

Albuquerque, NM

#10 Mar 19, 2009
she loves the outdoors....then why listen to the ipod....listen to the birds, the wind in the trees, etc.
the rescuers were talking and blowing a horn and she didn't shout out..??....girl you need to take a remedial Brownie scout course and earn you nature badge again.
stupid is as stupid does.
she's very lucky..........
True North

Santa Fe, NM

#11 Mar 19, 2009
old girl scout wrote:
she loves the outdoors....then why listen to the ipod....listen to the birds, the wind in the trees, etc.
the rescuers were talking and blowing a horn and she didn't shout out..??....girl you need to take a remedial Brownie scout course and earn you nature badge again.
stupid is as stupid does.
she's very lucky..........
You are so very right!I agree with you, but dont you agree with me-come on give some one some credit.
Gary Cascio

Albuquerque, NM

#12 Mar 19, 2009
A tiny bit of clarification on this story.

New Mexico search and rescue teams, while on a mission, do not camp. The two teams Laura heard were, in fact, very carefully searching the immediate area she was in. We had one team hike into that area earlier. They found, what they believed to be, credible evidence she was in the vicinity. Incident base then directed another team to assist in searching for her. Our two teams were in that area doing an intense search. There was a mixture of various trails, coming and going. Laura had gone up and back down most of those trails over the previous 20+ hours. The two hours our teams were there were spent searching everywhere.

There are times Incident base may request a team to take a break. Our teams search long and hard to find our subjects. They are out for hours and hours in very difficult weather and terrain. We like for them to take a small break every now and then.

One of our teams covered 9.5 miles with a total elevation loss and gain of over 3,000 feet (in snow 99% of the time) and were searching for 12 hours!(We had a total of eight different teams, along with the New Mexico State Police and New Mexico National Guard helicopters searching for her)

Also, New Mexico does not charge a subject for the time and effort involved in finding them. Our teams are all composed of volunteers who give up countless hours of personal time training and searching and spend much money buying specialized search and rescue gear for ourselves and our teams. We do this for many reasons. Monetary gain is not one of them.

Everyone involved was extremely happy to have found Laura safe and sound.

It put a smile on all our faces at 3:30 yesterday morning.

Gary Cascio
Santa Fe Search & Rescue
SAR 112
NMESC Board Chair
Thanks

Santa Fe, NM

#13 Mar 19, 2009
Thanks Gary, both to you and all the people on the S&R teams!
The Snowshoer

Albuquerque, NM

#14 Mar 21, 2009
MarkH wrote:
C'mon you heartless twerps, jose publico and mpb2! It's good to hike the mountains, sometimes folks get lost, the rescuers were volunteers, she was saved. It all turns out well, and you want spew blame and ridicule?
Thank you for your kind words Mark. Just now read the news story for the first time, because I was embarrassed about having made such a costly error. I have the WOFR cert through NOLS, and a degree in Outdoor Education, and years of experience in the outdoors. So, I was already scrutinizing myself pretty harshly for this blunder, and it's hard to read the harsh comments. I've hiked this trail many many times over the years, alone and with others. My pattern is to go very prepared and have never once before listened to music or iPod while hiking - it's not my style. But, I did once, and it cost me and the S & R. When the rescuers came, I thanked them profusely for their time, and apologized for them having to expend so much time energy and effort. What I was told was "You don't understand, we live for this - we haven't had a good mission for 2 months..." I realize it's easy to make flippant comments and false assumptions about someone you don't know, from a news story that may not be entirely accurate.
Frank V

United States

#15 Mar 23, 2009
Hi Snowshoer,

Thanks for responding on this site. I'm curious about what happened....given your experience and training, how did this happen? My angle is if someone like you with so much experience can get lost, what does it mean for people with less experience?

Knowing how & what happened might give us a bit more insight. Also...what route did you take? The article said Raven's Ridge and you were rescued by Aspen Ranch? How did you get down there from Raven's Ridge...without hitting the ski basin or going off the cliff into the Nambe Lake area?

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