Blue Cross Blue Shield Adds Autism Be...

Blue Cross Blue Shield Adds Autism Benefits

There are 209 comments on the News 9 Oklahoma City story from Dec 30, 2008, titled Blue Cross Blue Shield Adds Autism Benefits. In it, News 9 Oklahoma City reports that:

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma said it's adding benefits for children with autism.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at News 9 Oklahoma City.

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Sheri

Tulsa, OK

#1 Dec 30, 2008
This is only a step to what is needed like ABA therapy, assessment and diagnostic services and other items such as testing for specialized diets among other things that will help provide individuals with autism a life that will have substance and quaility. There are still insurance companies that will not write riders for ear infections, resp infections and such or for life insurance just because of the diagnosis of autism. Autism doesn't even shorten life expectancy. These people can not get help without someone speaking up for them. BCBS gets kudos for being honest that their contribution will minimally raise their rates and this may light the path to show autism will not be so drastically high in premiums rates as suggested.
Frankie

Oklahoma City, OK

#2 Dec 30, 2008
They're going to have to truly define what is and is not autism, in order for this to work. Labeling every quirky kid autistic and prescribing unnecessary, expensive treatment is what caused most insurance companies to quit coverage autism to begin with.
Sheri

Tulsa, OK

#3 Dec 31, 2008
Frankie, although you may have not understand what the definition of autism is, doesn't mean there aren't specialist that can assess, diagnose and treat persons with autism. There are proven therapies that makes autism treatable. The problem is there is not enough of them to go around. They can't get insurance to reimburse so the herd goes where the green grass is...... The waiting list are long, early intervention is key but people have been on long waiting lists. My son was suspected at 2. We did not get firm diagnosis until he was 5.
Wayne Rohde

Yukon, OK

#4 Dec 31, 2008
To Frankie

Autism is actually a specific diagnosis of what is called Autism Spectrum Disorder. Therefore, this epidemic has many forms and characteristics. Each child and adult is different.

The announcement on Monday by BCBS without any details led many parents and legislators to believe that an insurance company was doing the right thing, to cover medically necessary treatments and therapies.

BCBS released certain details on Tuesday that the majority of what is termed medically necessary will not be covered. So now, we have the same situation. No coverage for ABA or other behavioral therapy that has clinically supported research and data for over 20 plus years to prove it's effectiveness. Yet the insurance industry refuses to accept this by deflecting it and calling it "experimental" or stating that the schools should be providing this. Why should the public schools provide medical care?

BCBS just wasted everyone's time, destroyed the hopes and prayers of families with children and adults with autism, and passed the buck once again.
biolizard89

Norman, OK

#5 Dec 31, 2008
Frankie wrote:
They're going to have to truly define what is and is not autism, in order for this to work. Labeling every quirky kid autistic and prescribing unnecessary, expensive treatment is what caused most insurance companies to quit coverage autism to begin with.
Your claim that insurance shouldn't cover autism because treatment is "unnecessary" and "expensive" baffles me. Looking at PubMed, the first result for "ABA autism" is this (ABA is the main treatment for autistic children): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18775372...

Definitely effective, definitely not unnecessary.

And expensive? I was always under the impression that the main point of insurance was to cover things that are too expensive for the average family to pay out-of-pocket. And let's not forget the fact that if autistic kids don't get the required treatment, they are much more likely to be dependent on the state, costing all of us more in the end (If you want to talk about unnecessary, it's unnecessary to pay tax money to support people indefinitely when we could instead pay less up-front and get those people to be independent).
Frankie

Oklahoma City, OK

#6 Dec 31, 2008
Sheri wrote:
Frankie, although you may have not understand what the definition of autism is, doesn't mean there aren't specialist that can assess, diagnose and treat persons with autism. There are proven therapies that makes autism treatable. The problem is there is not enough of them to go around. They can't get insurance to reimburse so the herd goes where the green grass is...... The waiting list are long, early intervention is key but people have been on long waiting lists. My son was suspected at 2. We did not get firm diagnosis until he was 5.
The problem, as best as I can tell, is one of overdiagnosis. I have a very good friend who's son has recently been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. Here's how the diagnosis came about: The mom read about Asperger's on the web, and told the dad. The dad said, "Hmmm... Doesn't maintain eye contact, makes inappropriate comments, makes goofy faces every time his picture is taken, would rather play video games than football... Yep, he's got it alright". So they took him to the doctor and told the doctor they thought the kid had autism. The doctor agreed and prescribed some drug or other him. Result? No inappropriate comments, no goofy faces, no opinions, no zest for life, no personality. What I know about this that the parent's don't is that this kid is a chip off the old block. I grew up with the dad, and he was exactly like the kid when he was twelve. He grew into the biggest stud in our high school and is a successful businessman today. What if his parents had chosen this route, had it been available at the time? All the life he's enjoyed thus far would probably not have happened. What if Albert Einstein's parents had gotten some diagnosis like this? Would we have telecommunications or space travel today? I think we need to be very careful labeling kids who act a bit wonky -- we may be squelching a potential Einstein.
Frankie

Oklahoma City, OK

#7 Dec 31, 2008
biolizard89 wrote:
<quoted text>
Your claim that insurance shouldn't cover autism because treatment is "unnecessary" and "expensive" baffles me. Looking at PubMed, the first result for "ABA autism" is this (ABA is the main treatment for autistic children): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18775372...
Definitely effective, definitely not unnecessary.
And expensive? I was always under the impression that the main point of insurance was to cover things that are too expensive for the average family to pay out-of-pocket. And let's not forget the fact that if autistic kids don't get the required treatment, they are much more likely to be dependent on the state, costing all of us more in the end (If you want to talk about unnecessary, it's unnecessary to pay tax money to support people indefinitely when we could instead pay less up-front and get those people to be independent).
I believe in autism. What I don't believe in is all this autistic spectrum psychobabble. The way it stands today, EVERYTHING a human being does is the result of some psychological disorder. Got the holiday blues? Why, that's Seasonal Affective Disorder, here, have some drugs. Have a problem with authority? Why, that's Oppositional Defiance Disorder, here, have some drugs. They're raking in the clams by calling every kid who acts like a kid a nutcase. Any little boy who acts like a little boy has ADHD now. This "autism spectrum" is no different. A kid has certain ideosyncrasies or ticks, let label him and dope him up. You guys abandon this silliness, and insurance companies might actually start covering TRUE autism diagnoses again.
Sheri

Oklahoma City, OK

#8 Dec 31, 2008
Frankie wrote:
<quoted text>
The problem, as best as I can tell, is one of overdiagnosis. I have a very good friend who's son has recently been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. Here's how the diagnosis came about: The mom read about Asperger's on the web, and told the dad. The dad said, "Hmmm... Doesn't maintain eye contact, makes inappropriate comments, makes goofy faces every time his picture is taken, would rather play video games than football... Yep, he's got it alright". So they took him to the doctor and told the doctor they thought the kid had autism. The doctor agreed and prescribed some drug or other him. Result? No inappropriate comments, no goofy faces, no opinions, no zest for life, no personality. What I know about this that the parent's don't is that this kid is a chip off the old block. I grew up with the dad, and he was exactly like the kid when he was twelve. He grew into the biggest stud in our high school and is a successful businessman today. What if his parents had chosen this route, had it been available at the time? All the life he's enjoyed thus far would probably not have happened. What if Albert Einstein's parents had gotten some diagnosis like this? Would we have telecommunications or space travel today? I think we need to be very careful labeling kids who act a bit wonky -- we may be squelching a potential Einstein.
You assume everyone treats their child with drugs, not everyone uses drugs. Unfortunately some have no other option. That option is usually decided by a medical professional. It is hard to find people who have autism that are symptomatically the same, that is what makes it difficult to treat. If you have seen 1 person with autism you have ONLY seen 1 person with autism.

My son is 6 years old and has mild to moderate classic autism. He began reading at age 3. He couldn't tell me he wanted a drink of water or he wanted to eat, but he could sound out using phonics at 3 and not sight reading. His kindergarten teacher recently told me she had 2 other students with autism he was the only one that uses phonics. It is hard to find people who have autism that are symptomatically the same, that is what makes it difficult to treat. Alex is in a regular classroom with an aid. There are expectations for him. There is no feeling sorry for him. Everytime he learns something new, we raise the bar. He earns rewards for positive behavior and consequences for not so good choices. I have taken 1 year off from work and stayed home with my son. I have read as much about behavior therapy as I could get my hands on. We have tried to adapt. Currently, the school system, medicaid and persons with some resources are the ones who treats a child with autism. You will exceed in tax dollars spent in ratio to slight increase raise in insurance premiums. These children are "FORCED" into socialized medical care to get services rendered. You don't want to pay more taxes do you? You don't want insurance to go up. The lesser of the 2 evils is to let people try to become independent and try to provide for their families and not rely on your tax dollars right??? How can you enable independence if you turn them away due to a diagnosis without even looking at the child!!!!!!
Sheri okc not Tulsa

Oklahoma City, OK

#9 Dec 31, 2008
Frankie,
Also the prognosis for many of these children used to be institutionalized, this IS a reality for many today. There are some people who are in the authority to approve or deny services based on the idea that people with autism aren't worth the effort. This is the actual reason that insurance companies have not covered these services. Many states are discovering that the prognosis of institutional care is declining significantly with early interventions. There are services provided in Texas that require parents to attend school days with their children. Although these children learn differently, they are teachable. I toured a university in Texas where there was special mentoring programs in a fraternity house for people with autism. These people are learning to adapt and become independent. They will become taxpayers instead of recipients of socialized care. There will be less need for SSI.
Laurie - Edmond Oklahoma

AOL

#10 Jan 1, 2009
Frankie wrote:
<quoted text>
I believe in autism. What I don't believe in is all this autistic spectrum psychobabble. The way it stands today, EVERYTHING a human being does is the result of some psychological disorder. Got the holiday blues? Why, that's Seasonal Affective Disorder, here, have some drugs. Have a problem with authority? Why, that's Oppositional Defiance Disorder, here, have some drugs. They're raking in the clams by calling every kid who acts like a kid a nutcase. Any little boy who acts like a little boy has ADHD now. This "autism spectrum" is no different. A kid has certain ideosyncrasies or ticks, let label him and dope him up. You guys abandon this silliness, and insurance companies might actually start covering TRUE autism diagnoses again.
Frankie-
You say you "believe in Autism". So that means you believe there are some accurate diagnosis, correct? If so, why shouldn't the insurance companies who collect our premiums pay for proven therapies and treatments? And if you were correct in your "over diagnosis" theory, who would decide which is a "true" diagnosis and which is not? Who would decide which child will end up a ward of the state and which child will be able to live a more independent life? For most, a diagnosis is hard to come by and no one I have met would EVER take this diagnosis lightly because once it is in place everything changes. By the way, my granddaughter is not medicated.
You have a friend with a child you feel is misdiagnosed. Other than that, what experience have you had with people living with this? How much do you know about Autism?
This silliness,(as you called it), is something I feel very strongly about and fought hard for last session. I plan on doing so again this session. Please take some time to educate yourself on the subject and how it affects the families who live with it. These children deserve a fair chance and we will not give up until they have it.
Frankie

Oklahoma City, OK

#11 Jan 2, 2009
I've just seen what the medical community does. I'm no doctor, and thank God I'm not. Otherwise, I might be lulled by the lure of over-diagnosing. In the past 30 years or so, here's what the medical community has done: In the early 80s, everyone's back was out of alignment. Everyone needed chiropractic care. Chiropractors are like psychiatrists -- they can't afford to cure you, because they lose a patient if they do. So we've got people who have been going to the chiropractor for 30 years now. In the late 80s, everyone was raped by a relative. That was popular, trendy, and they made it so you weren't cool if you weren't raped by a relative. Everyone who was tragically hip just HAD to find someone who agreed they had been raped by a relative, even resorting to junk science like hypnosis to figure out,(make up), who it was. After that came ADHD -- you weren't cool unless your kid had ADHD and was on ritalin. A short time later, the bruxism guard was invented, so suddenly, everyone had bruxism. Then it was the sleep apnea monitor, and everyone had sleep apnea. Then it was sleep dentistry. Suddenly, the normal aversion to dentists that many people have and need to overcome, was a crippling and life-stealing condition, to the point that we needed to stick kids in the hospital and hire the services of any anesthesiologist, just to make the little shaver "less apprehensive". Eventually, most if not all the above wained in popularity. I feel that this business of calling mean kids "oppositional defiance disordered", and calling people with the holiday blues "seasonal affected disorder", as well as diagnosing socially inept kids with some ridiculous junk illness like Asperger's Syndrome, is the next link in the chain. People have quirks -- it's what makes them interesting, unique and human. Not every quirk is a medical condition, but if they can make us think it is, wowie kazowie -- look at what they can charge us for! And who picks up the tab? Either the rest of the insured or the taxpayers in general. Either way, it's us. This is why it's essential that we get the junk science out of the mix, so that the insurance companies,(which translates to all of society, ultimately), can cover the true conditions.
Sheri okc not Tulsa

Oklahoma City, OK

#12 Jan 5, 2009
Frankie, I am sorry you have issues and have doubt. It must not be easy being paranoid. The worst part of the autism for my son was when he was about 18 months old and he lost a sparkle in his eye to me. He began hurting himself. It is difficult to reach a child when they do not see anyone in front of them. It was a relief when he began show signs of other existing. Unfortunately he became so aggressive by hitting and pulling hair of anyone who touched him. That is where the interventions are needed. Alot of these children bite themselves. We did Sooner start but their visits were like only 1-2 times per month. Months went by before we learned how to teach him to stop hurting himself. It has taken years to teach him not to hurt others. One of the signs of autism is lack of empathy. There has been slow progress to teach my son, not really sure if he gets it yet. That will be all his life teaching I am sure. When my son started preschool at our public school, I watched him day in and day out beating his teachers and yanking their hari out/. Yes, we decided not to treat with medication and it took a long time to teach not to do that. He was teachable but it took soooo long. There is nothing popular about that. I have spent time trying to help others that may be going through the same thing. Being a toddler is the hardest time for us with autism. I have been to seminars, symposiums, support group meetings , and the capitol. I will keep trying to help others. My son is bright, he cannot speak up for himself. Parents have to be the ones to do it. I will everything I can to help people from going through the same thing we have been through. If you had children and you seen them oblivious and violent wouldn't you try to help them too? I have made great sacrifices to help my son. There are studies that show autoimmune disorders in maternal mothers maybe a cause beside the 20+ genes that have been associated with autism. My health is not so great. I have been to see a rhuematologist & dermatolosist. I shiver to think my autoimmune disorder caused injury to my baby when he was in the womb. The thing about autoimmune disorders you never know where your antibodies may attack next. This is not a popularity contest.
Laurie - Edmond Oklahoma

AOL

#13 Jan 5, 2009
Frankie wrote:
I've just seen what the medical community does. I'm no doctor, and thank God I'm not. Otherwise, I might be lulled by the lure of over-diagnosing. In the past 30 years or so, here's what the medical community has done: In the early 80s, everyone's back was out of alignment. Everyone needed chiropractic care. Chiropractors are like psychiatrists -- they can't afford to cure you, because they lose a patient if they do. So we've got people who have been going to the chiropractor for 30 years now. In the late 80s, everyone was raped by a relative. That was popular, trendy, and they made it so you weren't cool if you weren't raped by a relative. Everyone who was tragically hip just HAD to find someone who agreed they had been raped by a relative, even resorting to junk science like hypnosis to figure out,(make up), who it was. After that came ADHD -- you weren't cool unless your kid had ADHD and was on ritalin. A short time later, the bruxism guard was invented, so suddenly, everyone had bruxism. Then it was the sleep apnea monitor, and everyone had sleep apnea. Then it was sleep dentistry. Suddenly, the normal aversion to dentists that many people have and need to overcome, was a crippling and life-stealing condition, to the point that we needed to stick kids in the hospital and hire the services of any anesthesiologist, just to make the little shaver "less apprehensive". Eventually, most if not all the above wained in popularity. I feel that this business of calling mean kids "oppositional defiance disordered", and calling people with the holiday blues "seasonal affected disorder", as well as diagnosing socially inept kids with some ridiculous junk illness like Asperger's Syndrome, is the next link in the chain. People have quirks -- it's what makes them interesting, unique and human. Not every quirk is a medical condition, but if they can make us think it is, wowie kazowie -- look at what they can charge us for! And who picks up the tab? Either the rest of the insured or the taxpayers in general. Either way, it's us. This is why it's essential that we get the junk science out of the mix, so that the insurance companies,(which translates to all of society, ultimately), can cover the true conditions.
Ok - I understand your opinion on the problem of over diagnosing. But you did not answer my questions.
WHO decides? And what happens NOW to the children who truly need therapy and / or biomedical treatments?
No one here is saying the system is without flaws.
But even given those flaws - These children deserve a fair chance. I pay my insurance premiums. I am not asking for a handout for my granddaughter and I don't want state assistance. Why SHOULDN'T the insurance company pay for proven therapies in regards to autism?
Frankie

Oklahoma City, OK

#14 Jan 5, 2009
Sheri okc not Tulsa wrote:
Frankie, I am sorry you have issues and have doubt. It must not be easy being paranoid. The worst part of the autism for my son was when he was about 18 months old and he lost a sparkle in his eye to me. He began hurting himself. It is difficult to reach a child when they do not see anyone in front of them. It was a relief when he began show signs of other existing. Unfortunately he became so aggressive by hitting and pulling hair of anyone who touched him. That is where the interventions are needed. Alot of these children bite themselves. We did Sooner start but their visits were like only 1-2 times per month. Months went by before we learned how to teach him to stop hurting himself. It has taken years to teach him not to hurt others. One of the signs of autism is lack of empathy. There has been slow progress to teach my son, not really sure if he gets it yet. That will be all his life teaching I am sure. When my son started preschool at our public school, I watched him day in and day out beating his teachers and yanking their hari out/. Yes, we decided not to treat with medication and it took a long time to teach not to do that. He was teachable but it took soooo long. There is nothing popular about that. I have spent time trying to help others that may be going through the same thing. Being a toddler is the hardest time for us with autism. I have been to seminars, symposiums, support group meetings , and the capitol. I will keep trying to help others. My son is bright, he cannot speak up for himself. Parents have to be the ones to do it. I will everything I can to help people from going through the same thing we have been through. If you had children and you seen them oblivious and violent wouldn't you try to help them too? I have made great sacrifices to help my son. There are studies that show autoimmune disorders in maternal mothers maybe a cause beside the 20+ genes that have been associated with autism. My health is not so great. I have been to see a rhuematologist & dermatolosist. I shiver to think my autoimmune disorder caused injury to my baby when he was in the womb. The thing about autoimmune disorders you never know where your antibodies may attack next. This is not a popularity contest.
Don't most plans cover FDA approved treatment? The thing about autism as I understand it, and correct me if I'm wrong, is that much of the treatment is experimental. It is unethical for a healthcare provider to charge for experimental treatment. That's what test studies are for. If they're charging, then you're getting taken and ought to report them.
Other than that, if limitations and exclusions didn't exist, no one would be able to afford insurance. That, and the whole thing about it being an illegitmate exercise of power to tell a company how to conduct their business, so long as the business is doing so in an honest and forthright manner.
Frankie

Oklahoma City, OK

#15 Jan 5, 2009
Laurie - Edmond Oklahoma wrote:
<quoted text>
Ok - I understand your opinion on the problem of over diagnosing. But you did not answer my questions.
WHO decides? And what happens NOW to the children who truly need therapy and / or biomedical treatments?
No one here is saying the system is without flaws.
But even given those flaws - These children deserve a fair chance. I pay my insurance premiums. I am not asking for a handout for my granddaughter and I don't want state assistance. Why SHOULDN'T the insurance company pay for proven therapies in regards to autism?
Rights are something that are inherent, not something that must be stolen from someone else. Medical treatment is not a right, or at least, should not be in a free society.
Sheri okc not Tulsa

Oklahoma City, OK

#16 Jan 5, 2009
Frankie wrote:
<quoted text>
Rights are something that are inherent, not something that must be stolen from someone else. Medical treatment is not a right, or at least, should not be in a free society.
Actually, rights are what are worth fighting for, Americans have done it for years. No one handed our ancesters anything, blood was shed for your freedom and your rights. I will fight for laws to protect my son and others like him. There is freedom of speech and I intend on using it.....I believe my son it worthy!!!!!
Frankie

Oklahoma City, OK

#17 Jan 5, 2009
Sheri okc not Tulsa wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, rights are what are worth fighting for, Americans have done it for years. No one handed our ancesters anything, blood was shed for your freedom and your rights. I will fight for laws to protect my son and others like him. There is freedom of speech and I intend on using it.....I believe my son it worthy!!!!!
Exactly. Rights are inherent, and they're worth fighting for, should someone try to take them. That's what just government is about. However, the idea that you have a right to part of what I lawfully acquired, or that I should work and amass wealth so that someone else can take it from me is patently flawed. Your medical care is not a right if you have to steal from from someone else to get it. Having government do the stealing for you is just as bad, if not worse. It's still theft. Need does not equal right.
Sheri okc not Tulsa

Oklahoma City, OK

#18 Jan 6, 2009
Frankie,

Last month I had 5 medical appointments for my health. 2 dermatologist, 3 cardiologist and 2 primary visits. My son had 2 for an ear infection. Since I quit work we are doing without health insurance so I can provide my son care for my son. I will make this clear. We do not use state services, no ssi no medicaid. It would be easy for me to just give up and let YOU and all the other tax payers take my tab. I do not want a free ride, I don't want YOU or anyone else to pave my way. My family persists to be self sufficient and independent. We are registered Republicans and believe in tax cuts.

Early intervention services like Sooner start are paid for by tax services. Diagnosis and therapies are mainly paid by the school districts, your tax dollars and ones on medicaid/ssi are paid for by tax dollars atleast to regenerate funds are.

Person with autism gets NO coverage from some insurance companies. If they have pnuemonia tough luck, no doctor appointment, no copay for medication, no lab/xrays nothing, let me repeat NOTHING!! They reject the entire diseased person. NO rider!!! Is that fair??? Many children with autism have seizures that requires medication and blood work to reduce risk of toxicitiy and too low amounts in their blood system.

Since BCBS have decided to cover some services for autism, maybe others will decide to follow suit and a mandate wont need to be passed.

It was decided what the new Thunder team and their families were to receive for insurance premiums during the committe meeting millions of Oklahoma state dollars to pay for these, making it noted during that meeting that some of their families may not even move to Oklahoma. Do you think they will have insurance you bet ya, who flips the bill Oklahomans. It was mentioned that the players may only reside here during playing season and then return to their families out of season. The same day at the capitol this was decided Parents for autistic children was denied permission to speak during the meeting, we were denied freedom of speech. Even if you wanted to protest it you would not of been heard either, no one. The State Representative locked his elected office and refuse to hear us. Is that what you inherented also??? Representative Ron Peterson the chairperson of that committee did not run for re-election..... Just so you know he has a nice job waiting for him with a big fat raise and plenty of attaBOY's with a view in the inusrance field. Who do you think paid for his campaign? That is fair isn't it? None of these families want a street of gold, they want help.

California has autism mandates and the HMO companies made major profits.
http://cbs5.com/health/california.hmo.profits...
Butchey Weinstein

Oklahoma City, OK

#20 Jan 10, 2009
Sheri, I'm glad you're doing a great job taking care of that youngster; and I'm proud for you that you don't have your hand out like a lot of parents of Autistic children do.

While I see where you're coming from about them not covering an autistic child, period, that is their decision to make. If they said they would then don't, then we've got a problem. But as long as it's THEIR company and not yours, they're free to do what they want.

What bugs me most is the Rohdes' whining about not being able to take vacations and having to drive old cars. Every autistic parent should be as financially blessed as the Rohdes. The fact that they can't go to Disneyland two or three times a year or drive a stealth, well, that just makes them like the rest of us. At least you're not advocating for socialized medicine and wiping your **** on the Constitution the way they are.
keep it real

Edmond, OK

#21 Jan 11, 2009
Frankie wrote:
<quoted text>
The problem, as best as I can tell, is one of overdiagnosis. I have a very good friend who's son has recently been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. Here's how the diagnosis came about: The mom read about Asperger's on the web, and told the dad. The dad said, "Hmmm... Doesn't maintain eye contact, makes inappropriate comments, makes goofy faces every time his picture is taken, would rather play video games than football... Yep, he's got it alright". So they took him to the doctor and told the doctor they thought the kid had autism. The doctor agreed and prescribed some drug or other him. Result? No inappropriate comments, no goofy faces, no opinions, no zest for life, no personality. What I know about this that the parent's don't is that this kid is a chip off the old block. I grew up with the dad, and he was exactly like the kid when he was twelve. He grew into the biggest stud in our high school and is a successful businessman today. What if his parents had chosen this route, had it been available at the time? All the life he's enjoyed thus far would probably not have happened. What if Albert Einstein's parents had gotten some diagnosis like this? Would we have telecommunications or space travel today? I think we need to be very careful labeling kids who act a bit wonky -- we may be squelching a potential Einstein.
A true diagnosis is given by a specialist. It isn't done in 5 minutes. That Dr. they took their kiddo to is a quack.

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