Physics Wobbled by Faster-Than-Light-...

Physics Wobbled by Faster-Than-Light-Speed Experiments

There are 6 comments on the www.theatlanticwire.com story from Sep 22, 2011, titled Physics Wobbled by Faster-Than-Light-Speed Experiments. In it, www.theatlanticwire.com reports that:

Scientists at CERN, the famous Geneva-based physics lab, have just called into question one of the most hallowed equations in physics: E = MC2.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.theatlanticwire.com.

Mothra

United States

#2 Sep 23, 2011
--In the official announcement comes the more human reaction from a profession for whom the speed of light's unbreakability has been a core belief for generations.

"This result comes as a complete surprise," said Antonio Ereditato, spokesman for OPERA and a professor a the University of Bern, in a statement.

But he didn't dwell on the research's implications: "The potential impact on science is too large to draw immediate conclusions or attempt physics interpretations."

No doubt plenty of speculation will begin. But first things first: it's time for other physicists to try to figure out if the measurements could have been wrong and to see if they can be reproduced.

If the results hold up, it won't be the first time scientific beliefs have been upended. But Einstein's work has held up superbly under decades of verification and challenge.

The researchers will detail their results today at CERN, and they've published the results in a paper at Arxiv, a site for research that's not yet passed the peer-review scrutiny required for publication in academic journals.

"After many months of studies and cross checks we have not found any instrumental effect that could explain the result of the measurement. While OPERA researchers will continue their studies, we are also looking forward to independent measurements to fully assess the nature of this observation," Ereditato said.

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-20110594-26...

This would seem a rational approach -- ask other experts to review and possibly refute their findings.

Pity the AGW 'scientists' and proponents aren't as willing to have their 'settled scientific consensus' even questioned.
WOODCHUCK

North Port, FL

#3 Sep 23, 2011
"WARP 5! Engage!

“Headed toward the cliff”

Since: Nov 07

Tawas City, Michigan

#4 Sep 23, 2011
You mean we DON'T know everything there is to know?

Well DUH!

Only an arrogant fool would think we have all the right answers now.

Every "expert" thought they knew everything there was to know at the time, whether that was the 1400's or 1800's or 2000's.

The ONLY thing that is certain is that NOTHING is certain. EVERY rule will eventually be broken, even Einstein's.
Getflushed

San Jose, CA

#5 Sep 23, 2011
Einstein increasingly believed in God as he aged. This is why current Marxist/Atheist led scientists are trying to discredit him.

“your life is great”

Since: Aug 09

you poop in clean water

#6 Sep 23, 2011
my kids were just asking me the other day why we don't use transporters to get where we need to go, "wouldn't it be easier?" my 5 year old asked, "I'll invent it when I grow up" responded my 7 year old.

“It's a Brand New Day”

Since: Feb 06

New Rochelle

#7 Sep 23, 2011
Back to Newton.

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