T. rex more hyena than lion: Tyrannosaurus rex was opportunistic...

There are 39 comments on the Science Daily story from Feb 22, 2011, titled T. rex more hyena than lion: Tyrannosaurus rex was opportunistic.... In it, Science Daily reports that:

ScienceDaily - The ferocious Tyrannosaurus rex has been depicted as the top dog of the Cretaceous, ruthlessly stalking herds of duck-billed dinosaurs and claiming the role of apex predator, much as the lion reigns supreme in the African veld.

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Since: Sep 10

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#1 Feb 22, 2011
This makes no sense when you consider that hyenas probably hunt more than lions.

Since: Sep 10

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#2 Feb 22, 2011
When I say that, I'm meaning the name. I agree with the topic.
AnnoVerum

Suffield, CT

#3 Jul 31, 2011
Come on, why would t. rex evolve to be a scavenger with a bite that s powerful enough to shear through flesh and bone? Obviously it scavenged when it could, but it would need the extra nutrients from fresh meat to support such a massive body.

“1337-9001”

Since: Jul 11

Just south of the South Pole

#4 Jul 31, 2011
AnnoVerum wrote:
Come on, why would t. rex evolve to be a scavenger with a bite that s powerful enough to shear through flesh and bone? Obviously it scavenged when it could, but it would need the extra nutrients from fresh meat to support such a massive body.
And yet these people say spinosaurus, a predator up to TWICE the weight of t rex, was mainly scavenger.

“Taste my purging steel”

Since: May 11

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#5 Jul 31, 2011
Nitrox wrote:
<quoted text>And yet these people say spinosaurus, a predator up to TWICE the weight of t rex, was mainly scavenger.
Exactly. Who thinks of this stupid scavengar stuff?????

“Taste my purging steel”

Since: May 11

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#6 Jul 31, 2011
And what a surprise!!!! It was written by jack horner!!!!!!

Since: Sep 10

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#7 Jul 31, 2011
Also, the article claims that tyrannosaurus "could not run very fast", despite it being able to outrun creatures often seen as quicker and more agile.*cough* dromaesaurids *cough*

“1337-9001”

Since: Jul 11

Just south of the South Pole

#8 Jul 31, 2011
Phail.

“Yours truly....”

Since: May 11

Perryville, Missouri

#9 Jul 31, 2011
Nitrox wrote:
<quoted text>And yet these people say spinosaurus, a predator up to TWICE the weight of t rex, was mainly scavenger.
it prolly didnt scavenge mostly, mostly ate fish, then it would likely scavenge or hunt if fishing just really wasnt working out for it
Anonymous

Suffield, CT

#10 Aug 3, 2011
Nitrox wrote:
<quoted text>And yet these people say spinosaurus, a predator up to TWICE the weight of t rex, was mainly scavenger.
Actually, they consider it a piscovore (fish-eater, probably not spelling it right :)), and the only documented size of Spinosaurus is only 50 ft. They other "70 foot" size speculations were due to 1940s paleontologists saying that the leg bones "looked" juvenile. That specimen was destroyed in WWII. Spinosaurus, from what we know, lived with a similar-sized carcharodontosaur named Carcharodontosaurus. Since the apex-predator spot seems to be taken up, it is reasonable to assume that Spinosaurus could have been a piscovore/scavenger. Now, what would take up the apex-predator slot in T. rex's place? Not the tiny dromaeosaurs of the time, for Tyrannosaurus's deadly weapons were undoubtabely enough to outcompete them. It only really makes sense to place t. rex in the spot of apex predator, while Spinosaurus - well, the debate is not out on that.
Anonymous

Suffield, CT

#11 Aug 3, 2011
anomonyous wrote:
Also, the article claims that tyrannosaurus "could not run very fast", despite it being able to outrun creatures often seen as quicker and more agile.*cough* dromaesaurids *cough*
Thank you anonymous. The simple length of stride alone would be enough to propel it past its prey.

“1337-9001”

Since: Jul 11

Just south of the South Pole

#12 Aug 3, 2011
We don't know if spinosaurus was the apex predator of its environment.

“Yours truly....”

Since: May 11

Perryville, Missouri

#13 Aug 3, 2011
your right we don't, yet you potray it like it is one...
Epic Win

Austin, TX

#14 Aug 3, 2011
It probably was, along with Carcharodontosaurus.

“Yours truly....”

Since: May 11

Perryville, Missouri

#15 Aug 4, 2011
i think so too, while the carch may have been a more active hunter though

“1337-9001”

Since: Jul 11

Just south of the South Pole

#16 Aug 5, 2011
I think Spinosaurus, considering it was larger and thus needed more food.
3-headed Elvis clone

Austin, TX

#17 Aug 5, 2011
Spinosaurus would hunt fish more often. Carcharodontosaurus would hunt dinosaurs more often.

“1337-9001”

Since: Jul 11

Just south of the South Pole

#18 Aug 5, 2011
Ok then.
Some Guy

Middletown, NJ

#19 Aug 5, 2011
I use the word "hate" loosely, but I really hate Jack Horner in the world of paleontology. Its not that Tyrannosaurus wouldn't eat carrion if he got a chance (what predator wouldn't?) but in that program he did "Valley of the T-Rex" he gave literally no room for the idea that Tyrannosaurus was a hunter, even though it is almost CLEAR to me that he was.... Binocular vision, fast, smart by dinosaur standards, not to mention excellent sense of smell and a bone-crushing bite.... but yes, the title of this article is right, because just like anomonyous said, hyenas do most of the hunting on the Savannah, while it is the lions who often use their size and ferociousness to scare away the HYENAS. Then again I'd expect no more from Horner. I prefer Robert T. Bakker. Raptor Red was a good book.

“Taste my purging steel”

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#20 Aug 5, 2011
Some Guy wrote:
I use the word "hate" loosely, but I really hate Jack Horner in the world of paleontology. Its not that Tyrannosaurus wouldn't eat carrion if he got a chance (what predator wouldn't?) but in that program he did "Valley of the T-Rex" he gave literally no room for the idea that Tyrannosaurus was a hunter, even though it is almost CLEAR to me that he was.... Binocular vision, fast, smart by dinosaur standards, not to mention excellent sense of smell and a bone-crushing bite.... but yes, the title of this article is right, because just like anomonyous said, hyenas do most of the hunting on the Savannah, while it is the lions who often use their size and ferociousness to scare away the HYENAS. Then again I'd expect no more from Horner. I prefer Robert T. Bakker. Raptor Red was a good book.
Exactly. With all thise features it couldnt be purley a scavenger!!!!

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