What is Gondwana?

What is Gondwana?

There are 10 comments on the LiveScience story from Jun 7, 2013, titled What is Gondwana?. In it, LiveScience reports that:

Gondwana was an ancient supercontinent that broke up about 180 million years ago.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at LiveScience.

Since: Sep 12

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#1 Jun 10, 2013
No, a supercontinent is the only landmass currently on a planet. Besides Gondwana/Gondwanaland there was also Laurasia during that time.

“"I am error"”

Since: Apr 12

San Francisco

#2 Jun 10, 2013
Supercontinent doesn't HAVE to be the only continent on the planet, just a very large one, larger than the others. Today, actually, Afro-Eurasia fills this role. I think if millions of years from now, another civilization managed to see what the world was like in the Holocene era, they'd see 2 "supercontinents"- Afro-Eurasia and America, with Australia and Antarctica considered either very large islands or full blown continents.

Also, you can't bring up plate tectonics because Gondwana and Laurasia also comprised of multiple plates.

So I'd think they'd be a supercontinent, probably for at least Laurasia, but maybe not Gondwana, considering it was only South America and Africa (Although Africa is absolute MASSIVE- Mercator projections make it look smaller than it really is)

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#3 Jun 10, 2013
Altanative Whatever wrote:
Supercontinent doesn't HAVE to be the only continent on the planet, just a very large one, larger than the others. Today, actually, Afro-Eurasia fills this role. I think if millions of years from now, another civilization managed to see what the world was like in the Holocene era, they'd see 2 "supercontinents"- Afro-Eurasia and America, with Australia and Antarctica considered either very large islands or full blown continents.
Also, you can't bring up plate tectonics because Gondwana and Laurasia also comprised of multiple plates.
So I'd think they'd be a supercontinent, probably for at least Laurasia, but maybe not Gondwana, considering it was only South America and Africa (Although Africa is absolute MASSIVE- Mercator projections make it look smaller than it really is)
Well, Laurasia and Gondwanaland were of similar size, definetely not supercontinents.

And also, Europe is not a continent, neither is Asia, there is only Eurasia really. Afro-Eurasia if you'd like to include Africa(absolute massive, yes!).

“"I am error"”

Since: Apr 12

San Francisco

#4 Jun 10, 2013
You're correct. It was difficult to find maps of Laurasia and Gondwana which weren't just Pangaea maps with the northern part being Laurasia and the southern part being Gondwana.

http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs/vwlesso...

Apparently Arabia, India, and the rest of the southern half of the globe were joined with Gondwana.

Europe and Asia are still continents. There is no European or Asian tectonic plate, yes, but our understanding of continents far precedes our understanding of tectonic plates(Probably why Arabia and India are lumped into Asia!). Europe and Asia have been separate things for millenia now, you're not going to displace it just because of some silly tectonic plate thing.

Since: Sep 12

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#5 Jun 10, 2013
Altanative Whatever wrote:
You're correct. It was difficult to find maps of Laurasia and Gondwana which weren't just Pangaea maps with the northern part being Laurasia and the southern part being Gondwana.
http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs/vwlesso...
Apparently Arabia, India, and the rest of the southern half of the globe were joined with Gondwana.
Europe and Asia are still continents. There is no European or Asian tectonic plate, yes, but our understanding of continents far precedes our understanding of tectonic plates(Probably why Arabia and India are lumped into Asia!). Europe and Asia have been separate things for millenia now, you're not going to displace it just because of some silly tectonic plate thing.
It isn't because of the plate tectonic thing, it is because there is no geographic separation of Europe and Asia. Sure, there's those Ural Mountains, but then why wouldn't we use the American Rockies and Appalachians to divide North American into three different continents.

See what I am talking about.

The terms Europe and Asia should only be used to describe different regions, not continents.

Since: Sep 12

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#6 Jun 10, 2013
Also, here's a better map:

http://www.google.com/imgres...

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#7 Jun 10, 2013

“Australia's #1 Paleontologist”

Since: Apr 12

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#8 Jun 10, 2013
Gondwana was a supercontinent and so was Laurasia.

Whats the deal?

Pangea on the other hand was a super super continent (no im not taking the piss).

Since: Sep 12

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#9 Jun 11, 2013
Paleoworld-101 wrote:
Gondwana was a supercontinent and so was Laurasia.
Whats the deal?
Pangea on the other hand was a super super continent (no im not taking the piss).
A supercontinent is the only large landmass on a planet. Gondwanaland was not.

“"I am error"”

Since: Apr 12

San Francisco

#10 Jun 11, 2013
Paleoworld-101 wrote:
Gondwana was a supercontinent and so was Laurasia.
Whats the deal?
Pangea on the other hand was a super super continent (no im not taking the piss).
No, either Gondwana and Laurasia were contients or all 3 were supercontinents.

There is no such thing as a super super continent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supercontinent

Wikipedia's definition says that Gondwana and Laurasia are NOT supercontinents.

I think it's debatable, depending on the definition of supercontinent you use. If it just means "A large continent", then the likes of Laurasia and Gondwana can be considered supercontinents. If it has to be the only landmass on the planet, they're not.

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