Sea level rise: It's worse than we th...

Sea level rise: It's worse than we thought

There are 3768 comments on the New Scientist story from Jul 2, 2009, titled Sea level rise: It's worse than we thought. In it, New Scientist reports that:

FOR a few minutes David Holland forgets about his work and screams like a kid on a roller coaster.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at New Scientist.

PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2595 Feb 4, 2013
And we are in a drought with the rivers and lakes at an alarming low level. Sure sounds like scientific science fiction.

Since: Apr 08

"the green troll"

#2596 Feb 4, 2013
Steve Case wrote:
<quoted text>
And once again it's time to do the arithmetic. Here's that same graphic
http://oi49.tinypic.com/14id2yx.jpg
run on Excel with the addition of the final rate of sea level rise in 2100. Nearly 20 mm/yr. How likely do you think that is? realistically that's 10 times today's rate. All the rivers and glaciers in the world flowing at time times today's rate. All the rivers, not just the Amazon or the creek in your local park, everything.
Er, no. The ice sheets flowing at a higher rate.

Ice loss from Greenland has accelerated, ice is beginning to be lost from the Antarctic. That's where the extra water is going to come from.
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2597 Feb 4, 2013
Water, water everywhere except where the water needs to be. More scientific science fiction.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#2598 Feb 4, 2013
Steve Case wrote:
<quoted text>
And once again it's time to do the arithmetic. Here's that same graphic
http://oi49.tinypic.com/14id2yx.jpg
run on Excel with the addition of the final rate of sea level rise in 2100. Nearly 20 mm/yr. How likely do you think that is? realistically that's 10 times today's rate. All the rivers and glaciers in the world flowing at time times today's rate. All the rivers, not just the Amazon or the creek in your local park, everything.
Yes, Steve, if you project historical sea level rises that have occurred so far, & extend them ~linearly (depending on the intervals you use)into the future , sea level rise by 2100 shouldn't be a problem.

This is certainly what the North Carolina legislature wanted to be true. They passed a bill saying future estimates of flooding risks could be based ONLY on historical rates. Evidently you agree with them.

Luckily, the flaw in their (& YOUR) "logic" is extremely easy to see, & they were almost laughed out of office. The bill was withdrawn.

Past history is a guideline, but it is NOT a prediction. If you're walking down the center of railroad tracks, everything looks fine until just before the train hits you.
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2599 Feb 4, 2013
Guideline, prediction, opinion, could be should be and forecast more scientific science fiction.
SpaceBlues

United States

#2600 Feb 7, 2013
Does ph'd play the stock market without "guideline, prediction, opinion" and "could be, should be, and forecast?"

So the stock market is science fiction to it. LOL.
litesong

Everett, WA

#2601 Feb 7, 2013
phud fetid feces face fiend wrote:
Water, water everywhere except where the water needs to be.
You stumbled onto the answer, but do NOT believe it. Our Pacific Northwest had plenty of water, now gets more....... except at the times we need it worst. Those areas that were short of water, are even more short of water now. Its going to get worse.
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2602 Feb 8, 2013
litesong wrote:
<quoted text>
You stumbled onto the answer, but do NOT believe it. Our Pacific Northwest had plenty of water, now gets more....... except at the times we need it worst. Those areas that were short of water, are even more short of water now. Its going to get worse.
And you think topix doesn’t know what you publish? Attacks on me won't delete or erase what you are and what you do. You should stop making an ASSumption of your---self before you know the facts. Do contact topix to satisfy your accusations of the reprint BS your posting of what I said. You are a dumbASSumption of your---self again.
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2603 Feb 8, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Does ph'd play the stock market without "guideline, prediction, opinion" and "could be, should be, and forecast?"
So the stock market is science fiction to it. LOL.
No but your scientific science fiction does.
SpaceBlues

United States

#2604 Feb 9, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Does ph'd play the stock market without "guideline, prediction, opinion" and "could be, should be, and forecast?"
So the stock market is science fiction to it. LOL.
ph'd replies:
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>No but your scientific science fiction does.
huh, clueless.

LOL.
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2605 Feb 10, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
<quoted text>ph'd replies:
<quoted text>huh, clueless.
LOL.
Your dazed and confused again and again.
SpaceBlues

United States

#2606 Feb 10, 2013
---troll ignored.
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2607 Feb 10, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
---troll ignored.
So you the Commander TROLL continues to answer directly or indirectly. You keep the topix forums entertained and free at that.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

#2608 Feb 10, 2013
Climate change: How do we know?

The Earth's climate has changed throughout history. Just in the last 650,000 years there have been seven cycles of glacial advance and retreat, with the abrupt end of the last ice age about 7,000 years ago marking the beginning of the modern climate era — and of human civilization. Most of these climate changes are attributed to very small variations in Earth’s orbit that change the amount of solar energy our planet receives.

The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years.

Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. Studying these climate data collected over many years reveal the signals of a changing climate.

Facts about Earth's climate are not in dispute

The heat-trapping nature of carbon dioxide and other gases was demonstrated in the mid-19th century.Their ability to affect the transfer of infrared energy through the atmosphere is the scientific basis of many JPL-designed instruments, such as AIRS. Increased levels of greenhouse gases must cause the Earth to warm in response.

Ice cores drawn from Greenland, Antarctica, and tropical mountain glaciers show that the Earth’s climate responds to changes in solar output, in the Earth’s orbit, and in greenhouse gas levels. They also show that in the past, large changes in climate have happened very quickly, geologically-speaking: in tens of years, not in millions or even thousands.

The evidence for rapid climate change is:

• Sea level rise
Global sea level rose about 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) in the last century. The rate in the last decade, however, is nearly double that of the last century.

• Global temperature rise
All three major global surface temperature reconstructions show that Earth has warmed since 1880.5 Most of this warming has occurred since the 1970s, with the 20 warmest years having occurred since 1981 and with all 10 of the warmest years occurring in the past 12 years. Even though the 2000s witnessed a solar output decline resulting in an unusually deep solar minimum in 2007-2009, surface temperatures continue to increase.

• Warming oceans
The oceans have absorbed much of this increased heat, with the top 700 meters (about 2,300 feet) of ocean showing warming of 0.302 degrees Fahrenheit since 1969.

• Shrinking ice sheets
The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass. Data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show Greenland lost 150 to 250 cubic kilometers (36 to 60 cubic miles) of ice per year between 2002 and 2006, while Antarctica lost about 152 cubic kilometers (36 cubic miles) of ice between 2002 and 2005.

• Declining Arctic sea ice
Both the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly over the last several decades.

• Glacial retreat
Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world—including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.

• Extreme events
The number of record high temperature events in the United States has been increasing, while the number of record low temperature events has been decreasing, since 1950.

• Ocean acidification
Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of surface ocean waters has increased by about 30 percent. This increase is the result of humans emitting more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and hence more being absorbed into the oceans. The amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by the upper layer of the oceans is increasing by about 2 billion tons per year.

http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence
litesong

Camano Island, WA

#2609 Feb 10, 2013
brian_g stumble butt dumpster diver wrote:
deal with it.
Since oil & energy companies caused it & now pay lots of money to deny it, we'll make them 'deal with it' first.

They will fire brian_g stumble butt dumpster diver to start their 'deal with it' policy.
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2610 Feb 11, 2013
litesong wrote:
<quoted text>
Since oil & energy companies caused it & now pay lots of money to deny it, we'll make them 'deal with it' first.
They will fire brian_g stumble butt dumpster diver to start their 'deal with it' policy.
In addition, you think topix does not know what you publish. Attacks on me will not delete or erase what you are and what you do. You should stop making an ASSumption of your---self before you know the facts. Do contact topix to satisfy your accusations of the reprint BS your posting of what I said. You are a dumbASSumption of your---self again.
SpaceBlues

United States

#2611 Feb 12, 2013
Because of the human-caused climate change:

http://www.skepticalscience.com/pics/Human_Fi...
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2613 Feb 13, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Because of the human-caused climate change:
http://www.skepticalscience.com/pics/Human_Fi...
There you have it folks the spaced out spacedoutblues got its crystal ball out and made another prediction.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#2614 Feb 13, 2013
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>There you have it folks the spaced out spacedoutblues got its crystal ball out and made another prediction.
Actually, AGW/CC theory has made ~17-20 correct predictions, depending on how you count them. So yes, science DOES allow predictions about the future, & AGW/CC theory has made them correctly.

You may not want to look, but for those who do, this is a nice summary:

http://bartonpaullevenson.com/ModelsReliable....
PHD

Cibolo, TX

#2615 Feb 13, 2013
HomoSapiensLaptopicus wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, AGW/CC theory has made ~17-20 correct predictions, depending on how you count them. So yes, science DOES allow predictions about the future, & AGW/CC theory has made them correctly.
You may not want to look, but for those who do, this is a nice summary:
http://bartonpaullevenson.com/ModelsReliable....
17-20 correct "predictions" out of how many? It’s like throwing stuff on the wall and counting how many stick and calling it a prediction. I would argue that scientific science fiction allows predictions not science. Thanks for the link.

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