Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse Possibly Triggered by Ocean Waves, Scripps-led Study Finds

Feb 13, 2010 Full story: scrippsnews.ucsd.edu 80

Depicting a cause-and-effect scenario that spans thousands of miles, a scientist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and his collaborators discovered that ocean waves originating along the Pacific coasts of North and South America impact Antarctic ice shelves and could play a role in their catastrophic collapse.

Peter Bromirski of Scripps Oceanography is the lead scientist in a new study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters that describes how storms over the North Pacific Ocean may be transferring enough wave energy to destabilize Antarctic ice shelves.

According to Bromirski, storm-driven ocean swells travel across the Pacific Ocean and break along the coastlines of North and South America, where they are transformed into very long-period ocean waves called "infragravity waves" that travel vast distances to Antarctica. The study found that each of the Wilkins Ice Shelf breakup events in 2008 coincided with the estimated arrival of infragravity waves.

Full Story
litesong

Lynnwood, WA

#21 Nov 23, 2012
PHD wrote:
Another day forecast to be cold and dry and it's wet and warm. Could it be another climate change. Must be global warming no it's global cooling.
The present Arctic sea ice extent is less than any previous year, by your state's entire area+!

Your weather disappointment means nothing at all.

Furthermore(or less), the total Arctic sea ice VOLUME loss from ~1985, amounts to the area of your state piled to a depth of ~40 to 50 meters. Now, that is weather change!

Your weather disappointment really really means nothing at all.
PHD

Oak Park, MI

#22 Nov 23, 2012
litesong wrote:
<quoted text>
The present Arctic sea ice extent is less than any previous year, by your state's entire area+!
Your weather disappointment means nothing at all.
Furthermore(or less), the total Arctic sea ice VOLUME loss from ~1985, amounts to the area of your state piled to a depth of ~40 to 50 meters. Now, that is weather change!
Your weather disappointment really really means nothing at all.
Your arctic sea volume to your dissapointment really really means nothing at all.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

#23 Jan 5, 2013
"Humanity is conducting an unintended, uncontrolled, globally pervasive experiment whose ultimate consequences could be second only to a global nuclear war." [Suzuki]
PHD

Overton, TX

#24 Jan 11, 2013
You bet that’s the answer global war. That would solve your global warming cooling climate change. Please enlighten all with more words of wisdom.
spike

Cleveland, OH

#25 Jan 11, 2013
no liberals=no global warming
PHD

Overton, TX

#26 Jan 11, 2013
Just opinion forecast,predictions and global warming cooling climat change.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

#27 Jan 20, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
"Humanity is conducting an unintended, uncontrolled, globally pervasive experiment whose ultimate consequences could be second only to a global nuclear war." [Suzuki]
Exactly. Per NASA

Climate change:How do we know?

The Earth's climate has changed throughout history. Just in the last 650,000 years there have been seven cycles of glacial advance and retreat, with the abrupt end of the last ice age about 7,000 years ago marking the beginning of the modern climate era — and of human civilization. Most of these climate changes are attributed to very small variations in Earth’s orbit that change the amount of solar energy our planet receives.

The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years.

Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. Studying these climate data collected over many years reveal the signals of a changing climate.

Facts about Earth's climate are not in dispute

The heat-trapping nature of carbon dioxide and other gases was demonstrated in the mid-19th century.Their ability to affect the transfer of infrared energy through the atmosphere is the scientific basis of many JPL-designed instruments, such as AIRS. Increased levels of greenhouse gases must cause the Earth to warm in response.

Ice cores drawn from Greenland, Antarctica, and tropical mountain glaciers show that the Earth’s climate responds to changes in solar output, in the Earth’s orbit, and in greenhouse gas levels. They also show that in the past, large changes in climate have happened very quickly, geologically-speaking: in tens of years, not in millions or even thousands.

The evidence for rapid climate change is:

• Sea level rise
Global sea level rose about 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) in the last century. The rate in the last decade, however, is nearly double that of the last century.

• Global temperature rise
All three major global surface temperature reconstructions show that Earth has warmed since 1880.5 Most of this warming has occurred since the 1970s, with the 20 warmest years having occurred since 1981 and with all 10 of the warmest years occurring in the past 12 years. Even though the 2000s witnessed a solar output decline resulting in an unusually deep solar minimum in 2007-2009, surface temperatures continue to increase.

• Warming oceans
The oceans have absorbed much of this increased heat, with the top 700 meters (about 2,300 feet) of ocean showing warming of 0.302 degrees Fahrenheit since 1969.

• Shrinking ice sheets
The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass. Data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show Greenland lost 150 to 250 cubic kilometers (36 to 60 cubic miles) of ice per year between 2002 and 2006, while Antarctica lost about 152 cubic kilometers (36 cubic miles) of ice between 2002 and 2005.

• Declining Arctic sea ice
Both the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly over the last several decades.

• Glacial retreat
Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world—including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.

• Extreme events
The number of record high temperature events in the United States has been increasing, while the number of record low temperature events has been decreasing, since 1950.

• Ocean acidification
Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of surface ocean waters has increased by about 30 percent.This increase is the result of humans emitting more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and hence more being absorbed into the oceans. The amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by the upper layer of the oceans is increasing by about 2 billion tons per year.

http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence
Largelanguage

Rhyl, UK

#29 Jan 29, 2013
Wallop10 wrote:
<quoted text>
Exactly. Per NASA
Climate change:How do we know?
The Earth's climate has changed throughout history. Just in the last 650,000 years there have been seven cycles of glacial advance and retreat, with the abrupt end of the last ice age about 7,000 years ago marking the beginning of the modern climate era — and of human civilization. Most of these climate changes are attributed to very small variations in Earth’s orbit that change the amount of solar energy our planet receives.
The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years.
Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. Studying these climate data collected over many years reveal the signals of a changing climate.
Facts about Earth's climate are not in dispute
The heat-trapping nature of carbon dioxide and other gases was demonstrated in the mid-19th century.Their ability to affect the transfer of infrared energy through the atmosphere is the scientific basis of many JPL-designed instruments, such as AIRS. Increased levels of greenhouse gases must cause the Earth to warm in response.
Ice cores drawn from Greenland, Antarctica, and tropical mountain glaciers show that the Earth’s climate responds to changes in solar output, in the Earth’s orbit, and in greenhouse gas levels. They also show that in the past, large changes in climate have happened very quickly, geologically-speaking: in tens of years, not in millions or even thousands.
The evidence for rapid climate change is:
• Sea level rise
Global sea level rose about 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) in the last century. The rate in the last decade, however, is nearly double that of the last century.
• Global temperature rise
All three major global surface temperature reconstructions show that Earth has warmed since 1880.5 Most of this warming has occurred since the 1970s, with the 20 warmest years having occurred since 1981 and with all 10 of the warmest years occurring in the past 12 years. Even though the 2000s witnessed a solar output decline resulting in an unusually deep solar minimum in 2007-2009, surface temperatures continue to increase.
• Warming oceans
The oceans have absorbed much of this increased heat, with the top 700 meters (about 2,300 feet) of ocean showing warming of 0.302 degrees Fahrenheit since 1969.
• Shrinking ice sheets
The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass. Data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show Greenland lost 150 to 250 cubic kilometers (36 to 60 cubic miles) of ice per year between 2002 and 2006, while Antarctica lost about 152 cubic kilometers (36 cubic miles) of ice between 2002 and 2005.
• Declining Arctic sea ice
Both the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly over the last several decades.
• Glacial retreat
Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world—including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.
• Extreme events
The number of record high temperature events in the United States has been increasing, while the number of record low temperature events has been decreasing, since 1950.
• Ocean acidification
Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of surface ocean waters has increased by about 30 percent.This increase is the result of humans emitting more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and hence more being absorbed into the oceans. The amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by the upper layer of the oceans is increasing by about 2 billion tons per year.
http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence
Had to google that didn't you?
Largelanguage

Rhyl, UK

#30 Jan 29, 2013
Had to google that didn't you?
PHD

Overton, TX

#31 Jan 29, 2013
#1)Most of these climate changes are attributed to very small variations in Earth’s orbit that change the amount of solar energy our planet receives.

#2)The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years

Incredible NASA with ther scientific science fiction. Is it variations in the Earths orbit or human- induced. They really really don't know.
Largelanguage

Rhyl, UK

#32 Jan 29, 2013
PHD wrote:
#1)Most of these climate changes are attributed to very small variations in Earth’s orbit that change the amount of solar energy our planet receives.
#2)The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years
Incredible NASA with ther scientific science fiction. Is it variations in the Earths orbit or human- induced. They really really don't know.
Even NASA disagree with global warming. It is australia, not antartica which has a hole in the Ozone layer apparently, so antartica shouldn't even be a problem.
PHD

Overton, TX

#33 Jan 29, 2013
Largelanguage wrote:
<quoted text>
Even NASA disagree with global warming. It is australia, not antartica which has a hole in the Ozone layer apparently, so antartica shouldn't even be a problem.
Ahh more holes in their scientific science fiction. Can’t wait for the scientific science fiction characters out to respond to this one.
Largelanguage

Rhyl, UK

#34 Jan 29, 2013
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>Ahh more holes in their scientific science fiction. Can’t wait for the scientific science fiction characters out to respond to this one.
Confused and confusing science fiction.
PHD

Overton, TX

#35 Jan 29, 2013
Largelanguage wrote:
<quoted text>
Confused and confusing science fiction.
Only the scientific science fiction people stay in a state of confusion.
Largelanguage

Rhyl, UK

#36 Jan 29, 2013
What shall we call SpaceBlues? SpiralBlurrs?
PHD

Overton, TX

#37 Jan 29, 2013
Largelanguage wrote:
What shall we call SpaceBlues? SpiralBlurrs?
Just spacedoutblues or dazed and confused.
Largelanguage

Rhyl, UK

#38 Jan 29, 2013
SpaciouslyBlirt?
PHD

Overton, TX

#39 Jan 29, 2013
spaceoutbouncedout.
Largelanguage

Rhyl, UK

#40 Jan 29, 2013
SpankedBlack'n'Blue?
PHD

Overton, TX

#41 Jan 29, 2013
Now you have it good one again.

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