Guns In Your Home: A Statistical Accident Waiting To Happen

May 15, 2013 Full story: CBS Local 35

Many U.S. citizens consider their right to own a gun as basic as their right to eat, vote or go to school.

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Since: Mar 09

The Left Coast

#1 May 15, 2013
You are statically more likely:
to get struck by lighting if you go outside.
to die in a car crash if you own a car.
to be in a fire if you own a fire extinguisher.
not

Santa Fe, NM

#2 May 15, 2013
RustyS wrote:
You are statically more likely:
to get struck by lighting if you go outside.

.
if you have a gun in the house.

Really - read logic for dummies - you fit the bill and your posts make you look like a total idiot.

The evidence suggests that on average, having a gun actually increases the likelihood that a person will be injured or killed, rather than that it will be used to protect that individual from harm. If you own a gun, the most likely person you are to shoot is yourself. The next most likely person you are to shoot is a close family member. Homes with guns are a dozen times more likely to have household members or guests killed or injured by the weapon than by an intruder.The odds are much greater that the gun will be used against you or a loved one than that it will be used against an armed assailant or an intruder. Firearms are more often discharged in a homicide, suicide or an accident, than in self-defense.

Owning a gun increases your risk of falling victim to a gun accident, a suicide or a homicide. By practicing safe gun handling you can reduce the likelihood of an accident, and of course if you choose not to take your own life you can prevent yourself from becoming a suicide statistic. However, you have little control over how other household members may handle the gun unless you lock it in a gun safe. However, if your primary reason for owning the gun is to have it easily accessible in an emergency, the gun safe may undermine your rationale for possessing the gun in the first place.

In this country gun violence is a daily occurrence. Eighty-five Americans are shot and killed on an average day. Sixty-two percent of those who are killed are the victims of self-inflicted wounds from committing suicide. Most adolescent suicides are committed by youths at home who used the family gun obtained from home. States with weaker gun laws and higher rates of household gun ownership have higher rates of gun suicide and higher overall suicide rates. Although many gun control opponents have argued against counting suicides by firearms as gun-related deaths, because the suicide victim can substitute another form of suicide, Harvard researchers have found that fatality rates for suicide attempts with a gun are over ninety percent while rates for cutting, piercing, and drug overdoses (the other most common methods used to attempt suicide) are under five percent.

Thus, one of the most effective ways to prevent a depressed teen from killing himself (or for that matter, from killing others) is to make sure he does not have easy access to a gun. Although this will not guarantee his safety, it will make it much more likely that he does not succeed in taking his life.

Although Americans may fear the random stranger or the potential street thug more than friends or family, that fear is misplaced. Statistically the threat of being killed is much greater from someone who is welcome in your home than from an unwanted intruder. Eighty percent of homicides in the United States are committed by a family member, a friend or an acquaintance of the victim. Female murder victims are more likely to be murdered in the home than male victims and most female victims are killed by a spouse, an unmarried intimate partner, or a close relative. Lethal domestic assaults are nearly three times more likely in a household where a gun is present, and studies have shown no significant protective effect for having a gun in the home.

Male victims are more likely than females to be shot outside the home. While many men may carry guns for personal protection, a University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine study found that people who possess a gun are about 450 percent more likely to be shot in an aggravated assault or firearms homicide than individuals who do not possess a gun.

http://www.examiner.com/article/possessing-a -...
fooman

Costa Mesa, CA

#3 May 15, 2013
You are also more likely to be killed by medical malpractice than a firearm. Can we get an agenda based news article about that too?

Since: Mar 09

The Left Coast

#4 May 15, 2013
According to DOJ’s Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. gun-related homicides dropped 39 percent over the course of 18 years, from 18,253 during 1993, to 11,101 in 2011. During the same period, non-fatal firearm crimes decreased even more, a whopping 69 percent.

Bureau of Justice Statistics and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also found a dramatic drop in gun crime over the past two decades. Their accounting shows a 49 percent decline in the homicide rate, and a 75 percent decline of non-fatal violent crime victimization. More than 8 in 10 gun homicide victims in 2010 were men and boys. Fifty-five percent of the homicide victims were black, far beyond their 13 percent share of the population.(gangbangers?)

The evidence is clear, as gun ownership increases, gun violence decreases.
Still

Santa Fe, NM

#5 May 15, 2013
RustyS wrote:
.
lying, I see.

From the cited report:

What is Behind the Crime Decline?

Researchers continue to debate the key factors behind changing crime rates, which is part of a larger discussion about the predictors of crime. There is consensus that demographics played some role: The outsized post-World War II baby boom, which produced a large number of people in the high-crime ages of 15 to 20 in the 1960s and 1970s, helped drive crime up in those years.

A review by the National Academy of Sciences of factors driving recent crime trends (Blumstein and Rosenfeld, 2008) cited a decline in rates in the early 1980s as the young boomers got older, then a flare-up by mid-decade in conjunction with a rising street market for crack cocaine, especially in big cities. It noted recruitment of a younger cohort of drug seller with greater willingness to use guns. By the early 1990s, crack markets withered in part because of lessened demand, and the vibrant national economy made it easier for even low-skilled young people to find jobs rather than get involved in crime.

At the same time, a rising number of people ages 30 and older were incarcerated, due in part to stricter laws, which helped restrain violence among this age group. It is less clear, researchers say, that innovative policing strategies and police crackdowns on use of guns by younger adults played a significant role in reducing crime.

Some researchers have proposed additional explanations as to why crime levels plunged so suddenly, including increased access to abortion and lessened exposure to lead. According to one hypothesis, legalization of abortion after the 1973 Supreme Court Roe v. Wade decision resulted in fewer unwanted births, and unwanted children have an increased risk of growing up to become criminals. Another theory links reduced crime to 1970s-era reductions in lead in gasoline; children’s exposure to lead causes brain damage that could be associated with violent behavior. The National Academy of Sciences review said it was unlikely that either played a major role, but researchers continue to explore both factors.

The plateau in national violent crime rates has raised interest in the topic of how local differences might influence crime levels and trends. Crime reductions took place across the country in the 1990s, but since 2000, patterns have varied more by metropolitan area or city.

One focus of interest is that gun ownership varies widely by region and locality. The National Academy of Sciences review of possible influences on crime trends said there is good evidence of a link between firearm ownership and firearm homicide at the local level; “the causal direction of this relationship remains in dispute, however, with some researchers maintaining that firearm violence elevates rates of gun ownership, but not the reverse.”

There is substantial variation within and across regions and localities in a number of other realms, which complicates any attempt to find a single cause for national trends. Among the variations of interest to researchers are policing techniques, punishment policies, culture, economics and residential segregation.

Internationally, a decline in crime, especially property crime, has been documented in many countries since the mid-1990s. According to the authors of a 30-country study on criminal victimization (Van Dijk et al., 2007), there is no general agreement on all the reasons for this decline. They say there is a general consensus that demographic change—specifically, the shrinking proportion of adolescents across Europe—is a common factor causing decreases across Western countries. They also cite wider use of security measures in homes and businesses as a factor in reducing property crime.

But other potential explanations—such as better policing or increased imprisonment—do not apply in Europe, where policies vary widely, the report noted
Stranger

Hattiesburg, MS

#6 May 15, 2013
Of the 50 countries Wikipedia lists as part of Europe, only 1, Switzerland, has lower crime, violent crime, and unarguably lower homicide rates than the United States.

Comparing England to the U.s. crime numbers for comparable crimes, England reports 36,600 crimes per 100,000 persons, the US just 3,900. England reports 4,156.6 violent crimes per 100,000 adults, the U.S. just 386.6 per 100,000 of all ages.

I could go on, pointing out the multiples of U.S. crime rates in France and Germany and Poland and Spain and Italy and the rest. But the facts are easy to determine and to understand.

Twenty years ago, the UN Global Homicide Survey pegged the US at 28th place. The latest puts us in 102nd place.

The Bureau of Justice Statistics "2011 National Crime Survey" says violent crime is down by 75% since 1993. Our homicide RATE is down from 9.8 per 100,000 in 1991 to 4.7 in 2011.

In that same period, more than ten million Americans received licenses to carry - and Americans purchased more than 160 million new guns.

Eight of the states in the "bottom 10 for crime" from the FBI's Uniform Crime Report have very permissive gun laws. 9 of 10 states in the top ten for violent crime have very restrictive gun laws.

And of course, I could easily extend this to a million words. But the bottom line is simple enough.

There are 22,431 restrictive gun laws currently in force. Of those, not even one has ever reduced crime or violence. On the contrary, each and every one of those laws has resulted in sharp increases in violent crime and murder rates.

On the other hand, each of the 309 laws that require or encourage citizen gun possession has been followed by very much lower murder and violent crime rates.

So the bottom line consists of only three words.

Gun control kills.

Stranger
assault weapons ban

Pasadena, CA

#7 May 15, 2013
Stranger wrote:
.
The Bureau of Justice Statistics "2011 National Crime Survey" says violent crime is down by 75% since 1993.
in 1994
FormerParatroope r

Chicago, IL

#8 May 15, 2013
The article fails to link to the study.
What the story did do was present common sense firearm practices. Almost as if they took these practices from the NRA.

Since: Mar 09

The Left Coast

#9 May 15, 2013
Hey, if you don't believe the Department of Justice data, I can understand. Further, who gives a fck what happened in Europe. If we do that then we need to take economic lessons from Greece and tax your bank savings account 15%. The fact is gun ownership is up and gun violence is down - period. You can always say it was Bush's fault.
More

Santa Fe, NM

#10 May 15, 2013
RustyS wrote:
.
deflection. You got caught trying to sell BS. Period.
Stranger

Hattiesburg, MS

#11 May 15, 2013
The FBI numbers are in individual year reports. This link goes to a spreadsheet with the critical categories listed by year

http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/uscrime.h...

Scroll to the bottom for the individual States.

The 2011 National Crime Victimization Survey is here:

http://bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/cv11.pdf

The firearms violence survey mentioned in the report is here:

http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/fv9311.pdf

For comparison the latest British Crime Survey is here. It would be best to start on page 56:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/...

The truth about crime in Europe is here, which begins, in English:

"Contrary to common perceptions, today both property
and violent crimes (with the exception of homicides) are more widespread in Europe than in the US, while the opposite was true thirty years ago. We label this fact as the "reversal of misfortunes"."

You can read the study, here:

http://www2.dse.unibo.it/zanella/papers/crime...

And I could easily extend this to a few hundred thousand words. But the bottom line is simple enough. The honest studies, the data, and the survivors all say the same thing.

Gun control kills.

Stranger

“Shall NOT be infringed!”

Since: Apr 13

San Jose, CA.

#12 May 15, 2013
not wrote:
<quoted text>
if you have a gun in the house.
Have you always suffered from this paranoid delusion?

ONE PERCENT, TROLL:

Safety advice
Gun accidents down, but other home accidents on the rise
Feb 8, 2013 9:00 AM

Contrary to what you might expect from all the news about gun violence, accidental deaths from guns in the home are relatively uncommon, and have actually gone down slightly in recent years, according to a new study. But other deadly accidents at home, including poisonings, falls, and burns, are far more common, and on the rise. The good news: some simple measures can help prevent most of them.

The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, looked at data from 2000 to 2008. More than 30,000 people die from accidents in the home each year, the study found. The three leading causes of accidental deaths were poisonings (43 percent), falls (34 percent), and fire or burn injuries (9 percent).

>>>>>>> >>>Firearm mishaps accounted for just 1 percent of all accidental deaths in the home.<<<<< <<<<<

Poisoning, mostly from unintentional drug overdoses, and falls were the most common causes among adults. Suffocation and drowning were the deadliest accidents for children.

The good news is that accidents at home are highly predictable and preventable. The researchers point to key safety interventions you can implement in your home, such as limiting access to prescription medications, supervising children, and having smoke alarms that work.

As the authors of this study conclude: "Although injury statistics can guide practice and research, a more powerful force is the people behind the statistics whose lives can be spared and disabilities prevented through the application of effective injury prevention strategies at home."
http://news.consumerreports.org/safety/2013/0...

ONE PERCENT, TROLL.

Turn your pathetic attention elsewhere.

“Shall NOT be infringed!”

Since: Apr 13

San Jose, CA.

#13 May 15, 2013
assault weapons ban wrote:
<quoted text>
in 1994
Not quite:

United States Crime Rates 1960 - 2011 in relation to Gun Control Laws/NICS Background checks

"During the year 1992 the crime rates again leveled. While in 1993 most crime rates had fallen. Which fails to explain the justification for the Unconstitutional “Brady Bill”."
http://gunshowonthenet.blogspot.com/2013/04/u...
Another

Santa Fe, NM

#14 May 15, 2013
Stranger wrote:
one who is logically challenged...
downhill246

Boca Raton, FL

#15 May 15, 2013
Another wrote:
<quoted text>
one who is logically challenged...
At least you admit it.

Since: Mar 09

The Left Coast

#16 May 15, 2013
More wrote:
<quoted text>
deflection. You got caught trying to sell BS. Period.
Deflection? I quoted the Dept of Justice figures. You don't have to believe them. Given the IRS thing, the Benghazi thing and the DOJ phone tapping of news reporters thing, I don't blame you.

“Shall NOT be infringed!”

Since: Apr 13

San Jose, CA.

#17 May 16, 2013
Another wrote:
<quoted text>
one who is logically challenged...
"The American citizens are intelligent, well educated, and awake to the preservation their liberties; every where armed, and trained to the use of arms, and comprising a militia of nearly a million of free men, Are such a country, and such a people, in jeopardy; as to their freedom, from the existence a standing army of ten thousand men?"

- John Bristed,[THE RESOURCES OF THE OF AMERICA; OR, A VIEW OF THE AGRICULTURAL, COMMERCIAL, MANUFACTURING, FINANCIAL, POLITICAL, LITERARY, MORAL AND RELIGIOUS CAPACITY AND CHARACTER or THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. BY JOHN BRISTED, COUNSELLOR AT LAW. AUTHOR OF THE RESOURCES Of THE BRITISH EMPIRE. PUBLISHED BY JAMES EASTBURN & CO. AT THE LITERARY ROOMS, BROADWAY, CORNHR OF PINE STREET. Abraham Paul, printer. 1818

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#19 May 16, 2013
GunShow1 wrote:
>>Firearm mishaps accounted for just 1 percent of all accidental deaths in the home.<<
32,000 firearm fatalities a year.

Dead.

DACUSVILLE, S.C.— Two children were found dead in their beds, and their mother has been charged with shooting them to death.

Suzanna Brown Simpson, 35, a "model" volunteer at the children's elementary school, was charged Tuesday with two counts of murder, one count of attempted murder in connection with her husband's gunshot wounds, and one count of possession of a weapon during a violent crime, according to warrants signed by authorities.

Carly Simpson, 7, was "sweetness defined," said her first-grade teacher, Nancy Zeigler, at Dacusville Elementary School.

Her 5-year-old brother, Sawyer, was "enthusiastic, adventurous and creative" and loved to build things with Legos, said his 4K teacher, Jama Freeman.

Their father, Michael John Simpson, 34, was hospitalized with life-threatening injuries. He had been shot, authorities said.

Thirteenth Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins said the case could qualify for the death penalty if a conviction is reached because it involves multiple homicides and also because it involves children younger than 11.

“Shall NOT be infringed!”

Since: Apr 13

San Jose, CA.

#20 May 16, 2013
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
32,000 firearm fatalities a year....
In 2011, the latest figure available from the Centers for Disease Control,

Accidental discharge 851
Suicide 19,766
Homicide 11,101
Undetermined Intent 222

Deducting firearms used for suicide = 12174 (Because they would have used other means if firearms had been unavailable).

Deducting 74% because of gang related homicides = 1218 (Because criminals don't submit to 'background checks', and will always get their weapons illegally).

So, when REALITY is factored in, around 2291 people die per year from firearms.

And then there's THIS little interesting FACT:

Released: May 7, 2013
Gun Homicide Rate Down 49% Since 1993 Peak; Public Unaware
Pace of Decline Slows in Past Decade
http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2013/05/07/gun...

During that same period, gun ownership had SKYROCKETED. PROVING once and for all: MORE GUNS = LESS CRIME.

How many people die because of other violent means? 2011 FBI Data:

Knives or cutting instruments 1,694
Blunt objects (clubs, hammers, etc.) 496
Personal weapons (hands, fists, feet, etc.) 728

Those are the FACTS, traitor. It's your little buddies, the gang-bangers, causing all of the crime. And the ONLY reason they have been able to do so much damage. Is because of cowards like you, that cried for 'gun control'. And allowed all of the Constitutionally perverse 'bans' in the major population centers. You freaks disarmed the sheep, and the wolves went to town.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#21 May 16, 2013
GunShow1 wrote:
<quoted text>
In 2011, the latest figure available from the Centers for Disease Control,
Accidental discharge 851
Suicide 19,766
Homicide 11,101
32,000+ fatalities.

Fatalities means dead, GayDavy.

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