Scientist argues volcanoes killed dinosaurs

There are 17 comments on the Dec 7, 2012, MSNBC story titled Scientist argues volcanoes killed dinosaurs. In it, MSNBC reports that:

Tens of thousands of years of lava flow from the Deccan Traps , a volcanic region near Mumbai in present-day India, may have spewed poisonous levels of sulfur and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and caused the mass extinction through the resulting global warming and ocean acidification, the research suggests.

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PHD

Overton, TX

#21 Dec 10, 2012
So it was that global warming cooling thing that killed the dinosaurs. Not all the birds survived.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

#22 Dec 10, 2012
BuzzinFr0g wrote:
<quoted text>
No, they are talking about the K/T extinction. Even the "Dinosaur" headline is indicative of it pertaining to the one 65 million years ago. However, despite my prior post I see he referenced the Chicxulub impact as being a meteor strike instead of an asteroid, so he does need to brush up in that respect.
OK. I should have checked the article. I assumed that it was a misreading of the many articles on the work by Yadong Sun of the University of Leeds in Britain on the earlier extinction event (siberian traps, not deccan) that showed global warming of about 60C in the tropics and 40C in the oceans for millions of years. The extreme heat had actually killed off green life on the land and so exacerbated the warming by reducing any CO2 'recycling'.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-1...

It remains that almost all (and now probably all) extinction events on earth can be traced to unrelenting global warming. I quite easily accept that CO2 from the Deccan traps may have 'caused' the extinction of the dinosaurs. However, I wonder if the dating is all that exact. LARGE dinosaurs were probably in decline due to the oxygen levels being reduced from the peak levels of over 30%. To breath, the large dinosaurs would need all the oxygen they could get and with lower levels, the trend would be to smaller dinosaurs and fewer large ones which could give the misleading impresssion of a decline in dinosaurs prior to the asteroid.

Both extinctions are associated with an asteroid strike, followed by a flood lava event (Deccan or Siberian traps) which released enough CO2 to cause 'global heatstroke' resulting in a major die off.

The asteroid strike may have caused the flood basalt lava events.
PHD

Overton, TX

#23 Dec 10, 2012
So was it that global warming cooling thing that killed the dinosaurs. Not all the birds survived not all died.
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#24 Dec 10, 2012
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>No needs to apology just show your own work. The dinosaurs are alive and well in smaller versions. Next time you’re out and about take a long hard look you will see them. So did the bullet,gun or person that didn't move fast enough get the blame for the death?
What do you mean by show my own work? Where have I presented any claims that aren't already well supported by previously marshaled evidence? No need to reinvent the wheel. The law says the person who shot the gun is to blame, the physicist says the bullet, and the doctor says organ failure. My point is your claim that cooling and warming killed the dinosaurs is true, inasmuch as it was a direct effect of the Chicxulub impact. The same way that organ failure can kill someone, inasmuch as it was a direct effect of the bullet fired from the assailants gun. We can keep scaling down level of specificity, but to say that an asteroid impact wiped out the dinosaurs, although broad, is sufficient.
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#25 Dec 10, 2012
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>No needs to apology just show your own work. The dinosaurs are alive and well in smaller versions. Next time you’re out and about take a long hard look you will see them. So did the bullet,gun or person that didn't move fast enough get the blame for the death?
As for Dinosauria, I do realize it's paraphyletic without the inclusion of Aves, but I think you realize what is meant when people speak of the dinosaur extinction and instead just choose to be pedantic.
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#26 Dec 10, 2012
PHD wrote:
So it was that global warming cooling thing that killed the dinosaurs. Not all the birds survived.
Oh, if this is where you were going with the global warming/cooling claim, mocking the accepters of AGW and ascribing to them the fringe ideologies of doomsayers by claiming that this will be a "cataclysmic event" and throwing in a tongue-in-cheek prediction that it will officially be the extinction event to wipe out the dinosaurs (read:birds)then you sir are a massive troll; much larger scale than I had suspected.
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#27 Dec 10, 2012
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>No needs to apology just show your own work. The dinosaurs are alive and well in smaller versions. Next time you’re out and about take a long hard look you will see them. So did the bullet,gun or person that didn't move fast enough get the blame for the death?
It is fun, however, to look at birds as the walk about as dinsaurs. The same goes for looking at your fellow humans as terrestrial sarcopterygii.
PHD

Overton, TX

#28 Dec 10, 2012
You use the cut and paste thing. Show us your work. The law says. Who made law? Organ failure determined by? So global warming cooling climate change, organ failure, could have been blue maybe red you only know what someone told. You really really don't know.
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#29 Dec 11, 2012
PHD wrote:
You use the cut and paste thing. Show us your work. The law says. Who made law? Organ failure determined by? So global warming cooling climate change, organ failure, could have been blue maybe red you only know what someone told. You really really don't know.
Not a cogent idea. I see you grappling for one, or just engaging in colossal trolling, but either way you are failing to make a sensible statement. You are reducing everything to a sophomoric philosophical debate.

Analogies are never perfect, and the law is completely irrelevant to the point I was making. In answering your earlier question I was merely humoring your attempt at obfuscation. Henceforth I will dispense with responding to tangential points.

Cut and paste what? Care to get specific? As for your philosophical idea that the wheel has to be reinvented by everyone lest we can't accept it, fortunately most of science, and society disagrees with you. "On the shoulders of giants" and all that...
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#30 Dec 11, 2012
PHD wrote:
You use the cut and paste thing. Show us your work. The law says. Who made law? Organ failure determined by? So global warming cooling climate change, organ failure, could have been blue maybe red you only know what someone told. You really really don't know.
Think of it like this, mathematicians around the world usually are adept in a few areas, even if their focus is singular. That collection of fields that they are competent in were not all discovered by one person (usually). Once discovered and described, pupils can understand the material at a much faster rate than the initial trailblazer. Trailblazing is the hardest part.
PHD

Overton, TX

#31 Dec 11, 2012
BuzzinFr0g wrote:
<quoted text>
Think of it like this, mathematicians around the world usually are adept in a few areas, even if their focus is singular. That collection of fields that they are competent in were not all discovered by one person (usually). Once discovered and described, pupils can understand the material at a much faster rate than the initial trailblazer. Trailblazing is the hardest part.
Think of it like this, Scientist solve an issue to discover twenty five more that proves the first issue was incorrect. Ask Einstein. Mathematicians around the world in a singular or collective manner are sending this Great Country and possibly others off the fiscal cliff. Oh and they start the trail blaze at a faster sliding slope than any pupil can comprehend. Recovering from the trail blaze is the hardest part.
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#32 Dec 11, 2012
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>Think of it like this, Scientist solve an issue to discover twenty five more that proves the first issue was incorrect. Ask Einstein.
This is an assumption that, granted, can and does happen, but not . Additionally, science operates on trying to disprove hypothesese in order to further refine an understanding of an issue. That is it's strength not weakness; You mustn't be so eager to throw out the baby with the bathwater.
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>Mathematicians around the world in a singular or collective manner are sending this Great Country and possibly others off the fiscal cliff. Oh and they start the trail blaze at a faster sliding slope than any pupil can comprehend. Recovering from the trail blaze is the hardest part.
This is, again, a tangential and misrepresentative post. This seems like an espousal of anti-intellectualism. My comment is more about something like Calculus. It took minds like Leibniz and Newton to begin to uncover this branch of mathematics, but today many college undergraduates have exposure (some in HS).
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#33 Dec 11, 2012
*This is an assumption that, granted, can and does happen, but not mandatorily.
PHD

Overton, TX

#34 Dec 11, 2012
BuzzinFr0g wrote:
<quoted text>
This is an assumption that, granted, can and does happen, but not . Additionally, science operates on trying to disprove hypothesese in order to further refine an understanding of an issue. That is it's strength not weakness; You mustn't be so eager to throw out the baby with the bathwater.
<quoted text>
This is, again, a tangential and misrepresentative post. This seems like an espousal of anti-intellectualism. My comment is more about something like Calculus. It took minds like Leibniz and Newton to begin to uncover this branch of mathematics, but today many college undergraduates have exposure (some in HS).
Oh yes it is an assumption. Science operates on trying to prove an issue to discover additional issues to justify their errors. Look at it this way if you drained the water instead of throwing it out there would be no nee to worry about that baby. Well assuming the drain isn't so large that the baby slips down the drain.
It took minds from the best in mathematics no undergraduate (None in or out of HS).My comment is more like common sense and nothing from corners.
PHD

Overton, TX

#35 Dec 11, 2012
Statement should have read.
It took minds from the best in mathematics no undergraduate (None in or out of HS that successfully bankrupt the major Ind. and Banks of America).
BuzzinFr0g

Honolulu, HI

#36 Dec 11, 2012
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>Oh yes it is an assumption. Science operates on trying to prove an issue to discover additional issues to justify their errors. Look at it this way if you drained the water instead of throwing it out there would be no nee to worry about that baby. Well assuming the drain isn't so large that the baby slips down the drain.
It took minds from the best in mathematics no undergraduate (None in or out of HS).My comment is more like common sense and nothing from corners.
So, if mistaken/inaccurate science is bathwater, how do you propose the scientific community drain it?
PHD

Overton, TX

#37 Dec 12, 2012
BuzzinFr0g wrote:
<quoted text>
So, if mistaken/inaccurate science is bathwater, how do you propose the scientific community drain it?
You would have to answer that science bathwater thing.The drain thing would be my idea. Well you design a drain that wouldn't allow that baby to slip into. Oh they do make a child proof drain. Don't you love those scientist that give us all those wonderful things in life.

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