Swarming invasive insect found in US

Swarming invasive insect found in US

There are 15 comments on the WANE-TV Fort Wayne story from Jul 19, 2012, titled Swarming invasive insect found in US. In it, WANE-TV Fort Wayne reports that:

An invasive insect commonly found in south-central Europe has been detected in southwestern Idaho, marking the first time the elm seed bug has been spotted in the U.S., according to federal officials.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WANE-TV Fort Wayne.

Dr Stinko

Hampton, VA

#1 Jul 20, 2012
Wait til winter...
Not new here

Denton, TX

#2 Jul 20, 2012
Have had them in Indiana 2 summers. They get in the house on the walls. Nasty things we call them stink bugs.

Since: Apr 08

Location hidden

#3 Jul 20, 2012
not sure what all the buzz is about,

“Truth + context + perspective”

Since: Nov 09

informs against BS

#4 Jul 20, 2012
Not new here wrote:
Have had them in Indiana 2 summers. They get in the house on the walls. Nasty things we call them stink bugs.
Purdue University extension service has no information about these elm seed bugs being in Indiana and the article states that the Idaho finding is the first in the U.S.

Box elder bugs are in Indiana. They are similar and "related". Links with pics.

http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2011/02/04/boxeld...
http://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2011/0...

Since: Feb 09

Location hidden

#5 Jul 20, 2012
Deer Whisperer wrote:
<quoted text>
Purdue University extension service has no information about these elm seed bugs being in Indiana and the article states that the Idaho finding is the first in the U.S.
Box elder bugs are in Indiana. They are similar and "related". Links with pics.
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2011/02/04/boxeld...
http://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2011/0...
we have them, the stink bugs, their gross too. lol
not bad right now, but as soon as the fall comes, they think my house is theirs. i should charge them rent!
lol

hi luke...

“Jody”

Since: Apr 09

Location hidden

#6 Jul 20, 2012
What have they been saying,.. "Immigration is out of control!"

Hello, we erradicated them once, but the bedbug re-immigrated.

Since: Jul 11

""

#7 Jul 20, 2012
Deer Whisperer wrote:
<quoted text>
Purdue University extension service has no information about these elm seed bugs being in Indiana and the article states that the Idaho finding is the first in the U.S.
Box elder bugs are in Indiana. They are similar and "related". Links with pics.
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2011/02/04/boxeld...
http://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2011/0...
Box Elder bugs have been around forever, and contrary to what most people think they aren't limited to areas with Box elder trees, they are a very hardy bug that really have no natural enemies due to the taste of them, even Geese pass them by, they have a waxy outer coating that plays a part in their breathing that pretty much makes them impervious to most commercial Chemicals, but....all is not lost, a mixture of dish soap and warm water will dissolve that waxy coating which in turn suffocates them, on a warm Sunny afternoon following a chilly morning they can usually be found on southern exposed surfaces, they pretty much breed continuosly and the female is very distinctive by her blood red color and are just a fraction of the size of the males, they have a tendency to glob up (For lack of a better word) on the female which is the perfect time to spray them, you will never get rid of them completely but can control their population to a point. Other than looking so similar to a roach and their incessant buzzzzzing around they are pretty much harmless, they feed on freshly decomposing leaves and flowers, especially fruit tree leaves.

Since: Jul 11

""

#8 Jul 20, 2012
off the trail wrote:
What have they been saying,.. "Immigration is out of control!"
Hello, we erradicated them once, but the bedbug re-immigrated.
That's because we outlawed their only natural enemy, DDT. And they are coming back with a vengeance. Another one of nature's amazing survivalist, it can live up to a year without feeding.

“Truth + context + perspective”

Since: Nov 09

informs against BS

#9 Jul 20, 2012
SLY WEST wrote:
<quoted text>
Box Elder bugs have been around forever, and contrary to what most people think they aren't limited to areas with Box elder trees, they are a very hardy bug that really have no natural enemies due to the taste of them, even Geese pass them by, they have a waxy outer coating that plays a part in their breathing that pretty much makes them impervious to most commercial Chemicals, but....all is not lost, a mixture of dish soap and warm water will dissolve that waxy coating which in turn suffocates them, on a warm Sunny afternoon following a chilly morning they can usually be found on southern exposed surfaces, they pretty much breed continuosly and the female is very distinctive by her blood red color and are just a fraction of the size of the males, they have a tendency to glob up (For lack of a better word) on the female which is the perfect time to spray them, you will never get rid of them completely but can control their population to a point. Other than looking so similar to a roach and their incessant buzzzzzing around they are pretty much harmless, they feed on freshly decomposing leaves and flowers, especially fruit tree leaves.
This is so ... good post!

“Truth + context + perspective”

Since: Nov 09

informs against BS

#10 Jul 20, 2012
PFfff wrote:
<quoted text>
we have them, the stink bugs, their gross too. lol
not bad right now, but as soon as the fall comes, they think my house is theirs. i should charge them rent!
lol
hi luke...
Hi there, shore-bird !:)

“We're all Bozos on this bus”

Since: Jan 07

Indianapolis, IN

#11 Jul 20, 2012
Well the joke is one them. Our Elm trees were wiped out decades ago.

Since: Jul 11

""

#12 Jul 20, 2012
Uh Clem wrote:
Well the joke is one them. Our Elm trees were wiped out decades ago.
Ahh, the dreaded Dutch Elm disease, it has wreaked havoc on the elm trees. The big problem here at the present is the Emerald Ash Borer, killing all the Ash trees. Its devastating the timber industry, and quickly migrating south.
Anonymous

United States

#14 Jul 20, 2012
A 50/50 mix of water and alcohol will kill bedbugs if not on contact, damn close.

Since: Jul 11

""

#15 Jul 20, 2012
Deer Whisperer wrote:
<quoted text>
This is so ... good post!
Thanks, I've been battling them little "Buggers" for years, weather plays a big factor in their numbers as well.

Since: Jul 11

""

#16 Jul 20, 2012
wroady wrote:
A 50/50 mix of water and alcohol will kill bedbugs if not on contact, damn close.
That's interesting. A professional exterminator will seal the house off, maintain a near zero humidity and a temp. of 105-110 degrees for about 7 days. "if I remember correctly" basically dries the little b*stards right out.

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