New wetlands rules mired in opposition

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Click here to enlarge " /> Click here to enlarge DispatchPolitics A state plan to better protect streams and wetlands from development stalled three years ago after business groups complained that it would cost too much to comply.
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Anonymous

Lexington, KY

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#1
Aug 31, 2009
 

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I think the lesson here is we can build a vinyl clad house or a strip mall wherever we want, but we can't build wetlands wherever we want. Nature knows best, despite man thinking otherwise.
Gregory Wenker

Cincinnati, OH

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#2
Aug 31, 2009
 

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I wish there would be a tax incentive for building cisterns in every new home.

Since: Aug 09

AOL

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#3
Aug 31, 2009
 
"With the severe economic depression we're in, it may not be wise to move boldly ahead with new rules and regulations that would slow development down," said Vincent Squillace, vice president of the Ohio Home Builders Association.

I'm not aware that Mr. Squillace supported protecting wetlands even before the economy turned sour, and Im sure a smart man like him can find somwhere to build that isnt a wetland.
As for Mr Bournique, some of us wish he wouldnt be so eager to compromise -- given the fact that Ohio has already destroyed most of its wetlands. It's about time somebody in Ohio (this means you Ted) found the backbone to stand up to corporate greed.

Since: Aug 09

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#4
Aug 31, 2009
 

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"With the severe economic depression we're in, it may not be wise to move boldly ahead with new rules and regulations that would slow development down," said Vincent Squillace, vice president of the Ohio Home Builders Association

Maybe we can convert them all into casinos - eh, Vince? Think of all the jobs killing trees, hauling away dead birds and amphibians... We can bring the school kids out and show them someone's idea of progress.
claw71

Dublin, OH

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#5
Aug 31, 2009
 

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Using the recession as an excuse to ignore environmental issues is irresponsible. The consequences include investing heavily in clean up and restoration projects in the future.

The city of Columbus is struggling to correct its combined sewage overflow system. Unchecked development has placed a burden on both the sanitary and storm sewage systems. Columbus has been sued for the levels of raw sewage it dumps into the Ohio River watershed. This is because nobody thought about the consequences of development. It was all about putting up houses and shopping centers.

Developers are always looking out for today's dollars and figure that they'll be retired and living on an annuity by the time their irresponsibility catches up to the project.
Ohio Patriot

United States

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#6
Aug 31, 2009
 
It seems all new regulations are stalled at Ohio EPA. Wetlands and Construction & Demolition Debris rules are all overdue and more. While lack of leadership by the Governor is a big part of the problem (does he even know he has an EPA?) our corporate run legislature is just as big problem. I thought the D's taking over the House would help, but these guys are just as 'pay to play' as the Republicans. Let's face it Ohio, we need campaign finance reform or we're going to win the race to the bottom. But where will the force for reform in Ohio come from? Our body politic in Ohio is apathetic, easily distracted, always blaming someone else, doesn't accept responsibility, and easily led around by the nose by the right wing sound machine. We get what we deserve. By the time of our next governor, will Ohio look like the world of Mad Max?
DrC

Columbus, OH

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#7
Aug 31, 2009
 
I find it amusing that those who are opposed to wetland regulation actually have it easy here in Ohio. To mitigate a wetland in Ohio is about $20,000 cheaper than Indiana. Yes, Ohio does have some of the strongest protections on the books, but we have also lost over 90% of our wetlands in the last 200 years. This is second in the nation in percentage lost only to California.

I think wetlands and streams should be protected for many reasons; but those who aren't "environmentalists" need to remember that wetlands filter sediment before it goes into our streams, provide habitat for thousands of animals and plants, store carbon (anywhere from 1200 pounds a year to 5,400 pounds a year), and prevent flood waters.

So the next time your basement floods, there may be a wetland that would have taken care of that, but it was destroyed.

Additionally, the wetlands in New Albany have raised the property values by $10-$15K.

In Tinkers Creek (in NE Ohio) the wetlands per acre within the park are valued at over $300K. So, destroying wetlands for a strip mall, parking lot, or crappy housing development makes no sense.

The state should put a moratorium on projects that impact wetlands until our streams get heatlth.
DrC

Columbus, OH

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#8
Aug 31, 2009
 
OhioLawyer wrote:
"With the severe economic depression we're in, it may not be wise to move boldly ahead with new rules and regulations that would slow development down," said Vincent Squillace, vice president of the Ohio Home Builders Association.
I'm not aware that Mr. Squillace supported protecting wetlands even before the economy turned sour, and Im sure a smart man like him can find somwhere to build that isnt a wetland.
As for Mr Bournique, some of us wish he wouldnt be so eager to compromise -- given the fact that Ohio has already destroyed most of its wetlands. It's about time somebody in Ohio (this means you Ted) found the backbone to stand up to corporate greed.
Amen. The Home builders have been trying to eliminate all wetland and stream protection for years. Less than 2% of Ohio land mass is conisdered a wetland-can't we protect it?
DrC

Columbus, OH

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#9
Aug 31, 2009
 
Additionally, a study done on wetlands within I-270 a few years ago revealed that over 40% where not there, despite the fact they were in state and national databases. There was no issuance of a permit.
Magoo the shoe

Columbus, OH

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#10
Aug 31, 2009
 

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Nothing like a good old wetland full of mosquito's & frickin Canadian geese! Good use of the land. Not even good to grow corn.
If ya want a swamp move to New Orleans w/ their voodoo mayor.
KlD

Columbus, OH

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#11
Aug 31, 2009
 

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Protect the wetlands. Have we learned nothing? Why is it necessary to build in a stinkin' swamp? Come on.
SAL

Ashville, OH

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#12
Aug 31, 2009
 
Anyone who doesn't believe in the value of wetlands either is uneducated, or doesn't give a flip. My question would be this: why don't we keep better track of the actual profits made by these whining developers? Some developers are the richest people I know. So if/when they start complaining, let's ask some hard questions, people. The developers mutter about the threat of layoffs and so forth, but god forbid they have to give up their vacation homes!
Robin Tetzloff

Chicago, IL

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#13
Aug 31, 2009
 

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First, I was a 30 year resident of Columbus, now living in Bolingbrook, IL.

I still have a deep interest in the preservation of wetlands and streams near Columbus. I am thankful that my son, John Tetzloff, has been part of an effective preservation of Darby Creek.

I believe the Ohio EPA should enact much stricter standards. The present economic down turn is no excuse for allowing developers to not replace wetlands with wetlands of equal value. I have seen too many run off ponds around, with no aquactic life other than gueese.

Sincerely, Robin Tetzloff
In UA not RossCo

Columbus, OH

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#14
Aug 31, 2009
 
The people balking at protecting Ohio's wetlands are a real cancer to the state of Ohio. They're being paid to speak on behalf of developers, many of which are either from outside Ohio and/or plan to leave Ohio as soon as they make their millions.

And what are developers fighting to protect ??? They're fighting for the right to destroy Ohio wetlands in order to squeeze out a few extra million by building DATED McMansions OR suburban shopping centers that are here today BUT ghetto tomorrow..
In UA not RossCo

Columbus, OH

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#15
Aug 31, 2009
 

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Magoo the shoe wrote:
Nothing like a good old wetland full of mosquito's & frickin Canadian geese! Good use of the land. Not even good to grow corn.
If ya want a swamp move to New Orleans w/ their voodoo mayor.
IN REALITY... It's the wetlands that keep Ohio's urban areas from becoming the next flooded cities like New Orleans.

It's very well known that Midwestern flooding is the direct result of draining wetlands many years ago by Ohio's first pioneers (back when the environment was something to be tamed/conquered/destroyed)... Currently, Ohio's rivers are little more than high volume sewer pipes lined with cornfields that SHOULD BE wetlands......and it's very well known that New Orleans USED TO be protected by extensive swamps and barrier islands.

In UA not RossCo

Columbus, OH

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#16
Aug 31, 2009
 
Anonymous wrote:
I think the lesson here is we can build a vinyl clad house or a strip mall wherever we want, but we can't build wetlands wherever we want. Nature knows best, despite man thinking otherwise.
We can build a vinyl clad house or strip mall wherever we want... And 20-30 years after it's built it's going to look like Morse Road or 161.

I'll take the wetland anyday.
Moneygrubbers

Circleville, OH

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#17
Aug 31, 2009
 
Look at all of the empty buildings and vacant shopping malls in Columbus. Repurpose the things that are already there and leave nature (i.e. wetlands) alone!!
wetland policy pro biz

Westerville, OH

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#18
Aug 31, 2009
 

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I have attended several open house hearing process and publicly commented on the record to OEPA representatives when permits were being sought by developer to alter, fill, entrench specific wetland(s)or stream(s) within Franklin or Delaware County. First I am always surprised by how few people attend to voice their objections or submit formal comments in writing. So please become actively involved rather than whine. Second, The OEPA admits they are here to help serve and support business follow the legal rules. Third, the Ohio EPA has officially informed me that they have NOT rejected any developer's surface water permit request within Franklin County. Fourth, property falling under one acre or 1,000 linear feet mostly does NOT require environmental impact studies nor EPA permits for development. So no wonder developers don't want changes to this already sweet pro-business deal. I have personally witnessed wetlands filled and woodland tracts cut down only so developer could beat impending deadlines of stricter environmental regulations. Lastly the OEPA, unlike some others, does NOT yet recognized the CUMULATIVE loss impact effect on waterways.
Look around Polaris, Easton, the airport, New Albany, Westerville, I-670 far east, etc. We were environmentally better off when wetlands could not be touched, prior to the no NET loss wetland regulation allowing wetlands to be mitigated via "wetland banks" (nothing more than hastilly constructed duck ponds).
In UA not RossCo

Columbus, OH

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#19
Aug 31, 2009
 
Look at all the unfortunate garbage that developers construct all over Columbus... Fugly McMansions, earthtone stripmalls, fast food joints, etc etc.

Now with this in mind, why would anyone think that the same developers could construct decent, functioning replicas of wetlands ???
Ohio lawyer

AOL

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#20
Sep 4, 2009
 
wetland policy pro biz wrote:
I have attended several open house hearing process and publicly commented on the record to OEPA representatives when permits were being sought by developer to alter, fill, entrench specific wetland(s)or stream(s) within Franklin or Delaware County. First I am always surprised by how few people attend to voice their objections or submit formal comments in writing. So please become actively involved rather than whine. Second, The OEPA admits they are here to help serve and support business follow the legal rules. Third, the Ohio EPA has officially informed me that they have NOT rejected any developer's surface water permit request within Franklin County. Fourth, property falling under one acre or 1,000 linear feet mostly does NOT require environmental impact studies nor EPA permits for development. So no wonder developers don't want changes to this already sweet pro-business deal. I have personally witnessed wetlands filled and woodland tracts cut down only so developer could beat impending deadlines of stricter environmental regulations. Lastly the OEPA, unlike some others, does NOT yet recognized the CUMULATIVE loss impact effect on waterways.
Look around Polaris, Easton, the airport, New Albany, Westerville, I-670 far east, etc. We were environmentally better off when wetlands could not be touched, prior to the no NET loss wetland regulation allowing wetlands to be mitigated via "wetland banks" (nothing more than hastilly constructed duck ponds).
Agreed. Maybe OSU's Dr Mitsch can construct good mitigated wetlands, but in reality it's been a massive failure. But the greedhead homebuilders dont care and Ohio's General Assembly gave them what they wanted.

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