Arctodus simus vs Maritimus tyrannus, winner vs Arctotherium angustidens

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“Earth Science”

Since: Jan 10

MI

#1 Feb 16, 2011
Ad. simus: Short Faced Bear.
shoulder height, 6 ft; on hind legs, 13 ft.
length,~8 or 9 ft.
weight, 1,800 lbs.
bite force, 2,000 psi; claws, 8 in.

U. m. tyrannus: Giant Polar Bear.
shoulder height, 6 ft; on hind legs 13.3 ft.
length, 12.1 ft.
weight, 2,400 lbs.
bite force, 1,920 lbs (converted up by weight ratio), claw length NA.

At, angustidens: South American Giant Short Faced Bear.
shoulder height, NA; on hind legs, 11 ft+.
length, NA.
bite force, NA; claw length,~6 in +
Big Al

Milan, Italy

#2 Feb 16, 2011
UMT doesnt even exist, n even if it exists, nothin can be really said bout it
http://www.topix.com/forum/science/dinosaurs/...

“Earth Science”

Since: Jan 10

MI

#3 Feb 16, 2011
okay, so r u saying it's a giant polar bear?
Big Al

Milan, Italy

#4 Feb 16, 2011
Its not giant :)

“Earth Science”

Since: Jan 10

MI

#5 Feb 16, 2011
so they didn't even find a large skeleton, they just said it was larger?
mattking

Thompson, Canada

#6 Feb 16, 2011
Thats just Big Al's opinion, because there is no science sites provided about tyrannus's size or the animal itself he thinks that it doesn't exist at all. Personally I'm not one to say that it doesn't exist, however don't be surprised if someone proves it wrong. I would like to point out one thing, if it doesn't exist then I would expect someone to make a big report about it proving its non-existence, based on that don't just not beleive in it just yet because of those reasons, remember that in the future if nothing new about it happens then be it your opinion to beleive it or not!

-I'm neutral about it's existence because no one can prove it doesn't legitimately exist or not!
Colossalsaurus

Tavares, FL

#7 Feb 16, 2011
Even though UMT dens't exist,he wins, buts not a match for Arctotherium.
BTW,i really don't know much about Arctotherium, so can give me some more info?
mattking

Thompson, Canada

#8 Feb 16, 2011
Heres a link to lighten up the story and existence of Ursus martinus tyrannus

http://bestiarium.kryptozoologie.net/artikel/...

I quote and translate the info from this site!

Fleischfressende Monster 1: Ursus maritimus tyrannus

"I had thought about it some time again that I wanted to write something about some of the largest known meat-eaters, especially about some little-known meat-eating mammals. If one looks for the largest ever living meat eaters, then you will usually only the right Andrewsarchus known and much less known species Megistotherium and sometimes Sarkastodon. Admittedly, had large predators have always had a very special attraction for me, perhaps because it now only comparatively are few really large predatory animals, hardly any of these species takes off really and copies produced, which could be described as a gigantic . In today's living predators, the large subspecies of brown bears and polar bears are undoubtedly the most impressive. Large male polar bear, or brown bears of Kodiak or Kamchatka can reach weights of more than half a ton, in exceptional cases to three-quarters of a ton. That it has once been much larger but still bears, however, is hardly known. Although we sometimes read outdated information should have weighed on which cave bear up to a ton, but this is overkill most likely, and the large subspecies of these animals (of which there were dwarf forms) reached rather "only" the weight of big grizzly or Kodiak bear.

However, there was even a bear that would certainly have reached weights of one ton. We are talking here not of the notorious North American short snout bears Arctodus simus, the number of times a specified maximum weight of one ton for the largest specimens. This figure is but it is very likely a very massive over-estimation, but on the background to this subject, I would not go into more detail and present only in a later article. Today's polar bears are considered a very young evolutionary nature and their ancestors have split the first before a period of 100000-250000 years ago by the brown bear. The close relationship of the two species most in the fact that even hybrids of brown and polar bears are fully fertile yet. Probably once a population of brown bears by glaciers or ice drift has been isolated from their Artangehörigen, after which they adapted themselves over the generations that followed the prevailing living conditions. Probably very strong selection conditions prevailed in these animals, so that could develop the numerous anatomical differences between brown and polar bears within a very short time. From the development history of the polar bears are known several intermediate forms, which show that how these animals are more adapted to an exclusively carnivorous lifestyle, such as by the teeth of the omnivorous brown bears were modiziert more and are getting more sharp edges. Even before 10,000 years ago were similar to the teeth of the polar bear quite heavily to their ancestors, and only a developmentally very short time appeared typical of today's brown bears molar tooth shapes, although other developments such as the extension of the skull had been entered earlier. An ancestral form in the polar bear Ursus maritimus development of today was Ursus maritimus tyrannus (sometimes also written order tyrannicus, but "tyrannus" seems to be the correct spelling), a huge predator, the remains of 1964 in near London were found. Ursus maritimus tyrannus had a shoulder height of about 1.8 m and is expected to weigh about a ton of scarce have had. On this, courtesy of Daniel Reed provided comparative picture you can see quite well the enormous size of this animal:"
mattking

Thompson, Canada

#9 Feb 16, 2011
Fleischfressende Monster 1: Ursus maritimus tyrannus (part 2)

http://bestiarium.kryptozoologie.net/wp-conte...

"This is inter alia tyrannus shown next to a huge polar bears today. These animals were similar in terms of proportions and bite quite strongly their brown bear ancestors, and it is interesting that their descendants again decreased in size. I would imagine that the excessive increase in size of these animals could thus hang together, that they could benefit in contrast to most other animals of the ruling in their lifetime climatic conditions, and were in a position in a progressive south icing their range even expand. A larger area of distribution and possibly also existing large herds could have the appearance of bigger beneficiaries to bear the cold-adapted herbivores, such as musk oxen. How exactly these animals looked like is difficult to say, but it would be quite possible that they have already had a white skin. Maybe they saw apart from the size of modern hybrids and brown bears like ice, like this just recently in the wild shot hybrid
ListenRead phonetically"
mattking

Thompson, Canada

#10 Feb 16, 2011
Fleischfressende Monster 1: Ursus maritimus tyrannus (part 1)

I quote and translate info from site

http://bestiarium.kryptozoologie.net/artikel/...

"I had thought about it some time again that I wanted to write something about some of the largest known meat-eaters, especially about some little-known meat-eating mammals. If one looks for the largest ever living meat eaters, then you will usually only the right Andrewsarchus known and much less known species Megistotherium and sometimes Sarkastodon. Admittedly, had large predators have always had a very special attraction for me, perhaps because it now only comparatively are few really large predatory animals, hardly any of these species takes off really and copies produced, which could be described as a gigantic . In today's living predators, the large subspecies of brown bears and polar bears are undoubtedly the most impressive. Large male polar bear, or brown bears of Kodiak or Kamchatka can reach weights of more than half a ton, in exceptional cases to three-quarters of a ton. That it has once been much larger but still bears, however, is hardly known. Although we sometimes read outdated information should have weighed on which cave bear up to a ton, but this is overkill most likely, and the large subspecies of these animals (of which there were dwarf forms) reached rather "only" the weight of big grizzly or Kodiak bear.

However, there was even a bear that would certainly have reached weights of one ton. We are talking here not of the notorious North American short snout bears Arctodus simus, the number of times a specified maximum weight of one ton for the largest specimens. This figure is but it is very likely a very massive over-estimation, but on the background to this subject, I would not go into more detail and present only in a later article. Today's polar bears are considered a very young evolutionary nature and their ancestors have split the first before a period of 100000-250000 years ago by the brown bear. The close relationship of the two species most in the fact that even hybrids of brown and polar bears are fully fertile yet. Probably once a population of brown bears by glaciers or ice drift has been isolated from their Artangehörigen, after which they adapted themselves over the generations that followed the prevailing living conditions. Probably very strong selection conditions prevailed in these animals, so that could develop the numerous anatomical differences between brown and polar bears within a very short time. From the development history of the polar bears are known several intermediate forms, which show that how these animals are more adapted to an exclusively carnivorous lifestyle, such as by the teeth of the omnivorous brown bears were modiziert more and are getting more sharp edges. Even before 10,000 years ago were similar to the teeth of the polar bear quite heavily to their ancestors, and only a developmentally very short time appeared typical of today's brown bears molar tooth shapes, although other developments such as the extension of the skull had been entered earlier. An ancestral form in the polar bear Ursus maritimus development of today was Ursus maritimus tyrannus (sometimes also written order tyrannicus, but "tyrannus" seems to be the correct spelling), a huge predator, the remains of 1964 in near London were found. Ursus maritimus tyrannus had a shoulder height of about 1.8 m and is expected to weigh about a ton of scarce have had. On this, courtesy of Daniel Reed provided comparison image can be quite well the enormous"
mattking

Thompson, Canada

#11 Feb 16, 2011
Don't ask why one of the same info was posted twice, glitched out on me!
mattking

Thompson, Canada

#12 Feb 16, 2011
Colossalsaurus wrote:
BTW,i really don't know much about Arctotherium, so can give me some more info?
Here is one

btw, The south american short face bear is known as Arctotherium!

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/...
Colossalsaurus

Tavares, FL

#13 Feb 16, 2011
Holy shit that bears huge!!!Thanks so much for the info mattking and now...Arctotherium wins.
mattking

Thompson, Canada

#14 Feb 16, 2011
Colossalsaurus wrote:
Holy shit that bears huge!!!Thanks so much for the info mattking and now...Arctotherium wins.
Your welcome

“Earth Science”

Since: Jan 10

MI

#15 Feb 17, 2011
yea, angustidens (there are several species of arcthorium)would win, but idk about simus losing.. tyrannus had quite a bit of blubber (simus probably did to) but if tyrannus had blubber a lot of blubber that makes it weaker (also adds armor), which means simus having longer arms (adding an advantage in swatting speed)could stand more of a threat then u first thought. i'd say tyrannus 60%, simus 50%. angustidens vs either would probably be about 75%, to 25% against anything. angustidens does have pretty short arms (from what i guess based on the height, giving it's swats strength, but not speed/force.
SUCKer caller

Honolulu, HI

#16 Dec 20, 2012
Tyrant sea bear or giant polar bear: 1st place

Giant short face bear: 2nd place

Short face bear: 3rd place
SUCKer caller

Honolulu, HI

#17 Dec 20, 2012
Tyrant sea bear or giant polar bear: Maritimus tyrannus

Giant short face bear: arctotherium angustidens

Short face bear: arctodus simus
SUCKer caller

Honolulu, HI

#18 Dec 20, 2012
Tyrant sea bear
Giant short face bear
Short face bear
SUCKer caller

Honolulu, HI

#19 Dec 21, 2012
Come on,guys! Comment about bears! l know a 2 ton bear. It stands 13 feet tall. It preys on mammoths.
Aaa

Honolulu, HI

#20 Dec 22, 2012
Lol

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