created by: Arctotherium is 1500 kg | Jan 21, 2011

Dinosaur

17 votes

Vat do u think "URSUS" MARITIMUS TYRANNUS (Shawn, 1791) actually is?

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  • A real STRONG-ASS "u." maritimus subspecies (WTF?)
  • A nomen dubium (indeterminate ursid)
  • A new valid yet unnamed ursid species
  • A normal (n derefore synonym of) "u." maritimus
  • A normal (n derefore synonym of) "u." arctos
  • A valid yet unnamed non-ursid mammal
  • A dinosaur
  • A fossil of Adam
  • I cant decide
  • My gf is givin me a blowjob right now, so shut up!
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21 - 31 of 31 Comments Last updated Oct 2, 2011
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alloman

Salisbury, NC

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#21
Jan 21, 2011
 
ive olnly been on this for a while so how did this get of dinos???

Since: Nov 10

Rancho Palos Verdes, CA

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#22
Jan 21, 2011
 

Judged:

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i voted intermediate ursid.
mattking

Winnipeg, Canada

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#23
Jan 21, 2011
 
ninjasaurus rex wrote:
i voted intermediate ursid.
same!
mattking

Winnipeg, Canada

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#24
Jan 21, 2011
 

Judged:

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Utahraptor is 500 kg wrote:
<quoted text>Arctotherium is not da only mass i want 2 advertise :P!
You know whats the funny thing, in the last vote you could make I thought it meant My grandfather is givin me a BJ right now, so shutup! But then I thought, oh what its girl friend. What the hell was I think?:P
Utahraptor is 500 kg

Milan, Italy

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#25
Jan 22, 2011
 
mattking wrote:
<quoted text>
You know whats the funny thing, in the last vote you could make I thought it meant My grandfather is givin me a BJ right now, so shutup! But then I thought, oh what its girl friend. What the hell was I think?:P
OMG uve a very naughty mind... poor grandpa... hope he doesnt mind XD
mattking

Winnipeg, Canada

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#26
Jan 23, 2011
 
Utahraptor is 500 kg wrote:
<quoted text>OMG uve a very naughty mind... poor grandpa... hope he doesnt mind XD
LOL! I thought thats what you meant!
mattking

Winnipeg, Canada

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#27
Jan 23, 2011
 
The other funny thing is that I got one funny, one brilliant, and one nuts in the judge, 3 completely different things (more or less). Who voted brilliant, thanks! LOL
Ekrixinatosaurus is 11 m

Milan, Italy

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#28
Jan 23, 2011
 
mattking wrote:
The other funny thing is that I got one funny, one brilliant, and one nuts in the judge, 3 completely different things (more or less). Who voted brilliant, thanks! LOL
Im da 1 who judged u (who else could have been :P?)
Funny cuz u made me laugh, brilliant cuz ill rememba dis joke n nuts cuz u r crazy XD
mattking

Winnipeg, Canada

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#29
Jan 23, 2011
 
Ekrixinatosaurus is 11 m wrote:
<quoted text>Im da 1 who judged u (who else could have been :P?)
Funny cuz u made me laugh, brilliant cuz ill rememba dis joke n nuts cuz u r crazy XD
hahahaha
Fabrizio1990

Rovagnate, Italy

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#30
Oct 2, 2011
 
Arctotherium is 1500 kg wrote:
Dis is da only recent papa MENTIONIN it (its behin a paywall, so i cant read it)
INGOLFSSON & WIIG, 2009
LATE PLEISTOCENE FOSSIL FIND IN SVALBARD: THE OLDEST REMAINS OF A POLAR BEAR (URSUS MARITIMUS PHIPPS, 1744) EVER DISCOVERED
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j....
During recent fieldwork in Svalbard, a well preserved subfossil left mandible of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) was discovered. A 14C age determination shows that it is older than 45 Ky (kilo-years), and an age determination with infrared-stimulated luminescence—together with the stratigraphic position of the bone—suggests that it is of Eemian–Early Weichselian age: 130–110 Ky old. This makes the find the oldest remains of a polar bear ever discovered. Morphological analyses of the mandible suggest that it comes from a fully grown male that was similar in size to extant male polar bears. The comparative study of other available subfossil polar bear remains did not reveal any significant change in size of polar bears during the Late Quaternary.
AH AH AH! "U." maritimus tyrannus has been PWNED even before we knew it :P!

Ingólfsson & Wiig (2008) wrote:
"Apart from the Poolepynten specimen, the two other reported finds of polar bear remains presumed to be from EarlyWeichselian deposits are from Kew Bridge, London, and from cave sediments at Nordcemgrotta, in northern Norway (Table 1). The Kew Bridge specimen was dated on the basis of the stratigraphical position of the find: below it, stratigraphically, were sediments containing warm, interglacial forest fauna, thought to be of last interglacial (Eemian) age. There are no absolute age determinations for the fossil, but it has been assumed to be around 70-Ky old. The Kew Bridge find is special in that it is an ulna of a very large animal, considerably
larger than present-day polar bears. Kurtén (1964) assigned it to a polar bear subspecies, Ursus maritimus tyrannus. The Kew Bridge specimen has recently been reinvestigated by scientists at London’s Natural History Museum, and they are now confident that the Kew animal was a type of brown bear, U. arctos (Andy Currant, pers. comm. 2008). The finds from Nordcemgrotta were radiocarbon dated to 39–42 Ky B.P., and a 230Th/234U dating of calcareous concretions in the laminated sediments above the sedimentary horizon containing the fossil polar bear bones assigned them a minimum age of 70  8.5 Ky B.P.(Lauritzen et al. 1996)."

INGOLFSSON & WIIG, 2008
LATE PLEISTOCENE FOSSIL FIND IN SVALBARD: THE OLDEST REMAINS OF A POLAR BEAR (URSUS MARITIMUS PHIPPS, 1744) EVER DISCOVERED
http://www.polarresearch.net/index.php/polar/...
During recent fieldwork in Svalbard, a well preserved subfossil left mandible of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) was discovered. A 14C age determination shows that it is older than 45 Ky (kilo-years), and an age determination with infrared-stimulated luminescence—together with the stratigraphic position of the bone—suggests that it is of Eemian–Early Weichselian age: 130–110 Ky old. This makes the find the oldest remains of a polar bear ever discovered. Morphological analyses of the mandible suggest that it comes from a fully grown male that was similar in size to extant male polar bears. The comparative study of other available subfossil polar bear remains did not reveal any significant change in size of polar bears during the Late Quaternary.

“SIDEWINDER”

Since: Aug 11

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#31
Oct 2, 2011
 
A big polar bear thing.

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