Livyatan Melvillei vs Carcharocles Me...

“DoubleTheClaw, DoubleThePain”

Since: Aug 11

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

#485 May 25, 2012
Giganotosaurus wrote:
<quoted text>
And also it seems leviathan for sharks. Its sonar is perfect to stun, and its teeth are made to punture shark hide. They both do their jobs well.
dinotrek27 wrote:
<quoted text>
Not really I think 50/50 is better. Remember. Meg is evolved to hunt whales.
Basically both were adapted for killing each other.
WHITE PEOPLE MUST DIE

Assago, Italy

#486 May 26, 2012
Giganotosaurus wrote:
And also it seems leviathan for sharks. Its sonar is perfect to stun,and its teeth are made to punture shark hide. They both do their jobs well.
I REALLY LOVE Livyatan melvillei from Peru, but...

BENOIT-BIRD, AU & KASTELEIN, 2006
TESTING THE ODONTOCETE ACOUSTIC PREY DEBILITATION HYPOTHESIS: NO STUNNING RESULTS
http://people.oregonstate.edu/~benoitbk/repri...
The hypothesis that sounds produced by odontocetes can debilitate fish was examined. The effects of simulated odontocete pulsed signals on three species of fish commonly preyed on by odontocetes were examined, exposing three individuals of each species as well as groups of four fish to a high-frequency click of a bottlenose dolphin [peak frequency (PF) 120 kHz, 213-dB peak-to-peak exposure level (EL)], a midfrequency click modeled after a killer whale's signal (PF 55 kHz, 208-dB EL), and a low-frequency click (PF 18 kHz, 193-dB EL). Fish were held in a 50-cm diameter net enclosure immediately in front of a transducer where their swimming behavior, orientation, and balance were observed with two video cameras. Clicks were presented at constant rates and in graded sweeps simulating a foraging dolphin's "terminal buzz." No measurable change in behavior was observed in any of the fish for any signal type or pulse modulation rate, despite the fact that clicks were at or near the maximum source levels recorded for odontocetes. Based on the results, the hypothesis that acoustic signals of odontocetes alone can disorient or "stun" prey cannot be supported.

SCHACK, MALTE & MADSEN, 2008
THE RESPONSES OF ATLANTIC COD (GAUS MORHUA L.) TO ULTRASOUND-EMITTING PREDATORS: STRESS, BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES OR DEBILITATION?
http://jeb.biologists.org/content/211/13/2079...
A previous study has reported that Atlantic cod can be conditioned to detect ultrasonic sound pulses of high intensity. This capability has been proposed as a mean for detection and avoidance of echolocating toothed whales that emit intense ultrasonic clicks. In this study, we use acoustic playbacks to test the hypotheses that unconditioned cod can detect and respond to intense ultrasound from toothed whales and from echosounders. Intense ultrasound exposure of 210 dB re. 1&#956;Pa (pp) did not cause a short-term stress response in the form of bradycardia in unconditioned cod. Free-swimming cod exposed to ultrasonic clicks and echosounder pulses with received levels of more than 204 dB re. 1 &#956;Pa (pp) did not elicit flight responses as seen in ultrasound detecting Alosinae. Furthermore, we tested the debilitating effects of high intensity ultrasound on swimming cod with no detected changes in swimming ability when exposed to more than 213 dB re. 1 &#956;Pa (pp). It is concluded that intense ultrasound exposure induces neither an antipredator nor a stress response in Atlantic cod, and that echosounder pulses and biosonar clicks therefore most probably play no ecophysiological role in wild cod populations.

SCHACK, MALTE & MADSEN, 2008
EFFECTS OF INTENSE ULTRASOUND ON ATLANTIC COD, GADUS MORHUA
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09...

WILSON ET AL., 2008
BIG BANG? INTENSE ULTRASOUND DOES NOT HAVE ANY DETECTABLE EFFECTS ON THE SQUID LOLIGO PEALEII
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09...

“Taste my purging steel”

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#487 May 26, 2012
WHITE PEOPLE MUST DIE wrote:
<quoted text>I REALLY LOVE Livyatan melvillei from Peru, but...

BENOIT-BIRD, AU & KASTELEIN, 2006
TESTING THE ODONTOCETE ACOUSTIC PREY DEBILITATION HYPOTHESIS: NO STUNNING RESULTS
http://people.oregonstate.edu/~benoitbk/repri...
The hypothesis that sounds produced by odontocetes can debilitate fish was examined. The effects of simulated odontocete pulsed signals on three species of fish commonly preyed on by odontocetes were examined, exposing three individuals of each species as well as groups of four fish to a high-frequency click of a bottlenose dolphin [peak frequency (PF) 120 kHz, 213-dB peak-to-peak exposure level (EL)], a midfrequency click modeled after a killer whale's signal (PF 55 kHz, 208-dB EL), and a low-frequency click (PF 18 kHz, 193-dB EL). Fish were held in a 50-cm diameter net enclosure immediately in front of a transducer where their swimming behavior, orientation, and balance were observed with two video cameras. Clicks were presented at constant rates and in graded sweeps simulating a foraging dolphin's "terminal buzz." No measurable change in behavior was observed in any of the fish for any signal type or pulse modulation rate, despite the fact that clicks were at or near the maximum source levels recorded for odontocetes. Based on the results, the hypothesis that acoustic signals of odontocetes alone can disorient or "stun" prey cannot be supported.

SCHACK, MALTE & MADSEN, 2008
THE RESPONSES OF ATLANTIC COD (GAUS MORHUA L.) TO ULTRASOUND-EMITTING PREDATORS: STRESS, BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES OR DEBILITATION?
http://jeb.biologists.org/content/211/13/2079...
A previous study has reported that Atlantic cod can be conditioned to detect ultrasonic sound pulses of high intensity. This capability has been proposed as a mean for detection and avoidance of echolocating toothed whales that emit intense ultrasonic clicks. In this study, we use acoustic playbacks to test the hypotheses that unconditioned cod can detect and respond to intense ultrasound from toothed whales and from echosounders. Intense ultrasound exposure of 210 dB re. 1&#956;Pa (pp) did not cause a short-term stress response in the form of bradycardia in unconditioned cod. Free-swimming cod exposed to ultrasonic clicks and echosounder pulses with received levels of more than 204 dB re. 1 &#956;Pa (pp) did not elicit flight responses as seen in ultrasound detecting Alosinae. Furthermore, we tested the debilitating effects of high intensity ultrasound on swimming cod with no detected changes in swimming ability when exposed to more than 213 dB re. 1 &#956;Pa (pp). It is concluded that intense ultrasound exposure induces neither an antipredator nor a stress response in Atlantic cod, and that echosounder pulses and biosonar clicks therefore most probably play no ecophysiological role in wild cod populations.

SCHACK, MALTE & MADSEN, 2008
EFFECTS OF INTENSE ULTRASOUND ON ATLANTIC COD, GADUS MORHUA
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09...

WILSON ET AL., 2008
BIG BANG? INTENSE ULTRASOUND DOES NOT HAVE ANY DETECTABLE EFFECTS ON THE SQUID LOLIGO PEALEII
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09...
Name overkill much?

“God is good, All the time”

Since: Nov 11

Singapore

#488 May 26, 2012
Balaur wrote:
<quoted text>
<quoted text>
Basically both were adapted for killing each other.
Agreed. Thats why I say 50/50.

Teeth: Draw
Size: Draw
Speed and Agility: Meg
Stun Power: Livyatan
Defence: Draw

No one wins. Stun power and agility cancel each other out. There is a 50/50 chance that Liv would stun Meg with sonar. And a 50/50 chance that Meg would evade Liv and strike a killing blow.
WHITE PEOPLE MUST DIE

Assago, Italy

#489 May 26, 2012
dinotrek27 wrote:
<quoted text>
Agreed. Thats why I say 50/50.
Teeth: Draw
Size: Draw
Speed and Agility: Meg
Stun Power: Livyatan
Defence: Draw
No one wins. Stun power and agility cancel each other out. There is a 50/50 chance that Liv would stun Meg with sonar. And a 50/50 chance that Meg would evade Liv and strike a killing blow.
http://www.topix.com/forum/science/dinosaurs/...
Spinosaurus

Philippines

#490 May 31, 2012
Leviathan will win because the megalodon got shorter teeth.
Spinosaurus

Philippines

#491 May 31, 2012
No way guys LOL Leviathan is the king of the SEA!!!!!!!!!!
Spinosaurus Rex

Toronto, Canada

#492 Jun 4, 2012
I'm going with Levi. The largest whale Mega hunts is probably brygmophyseter. A whale is much smarter too!
Levi is a killer beast that kills anything disturbing it. Levi can just stun it with sonar and eat it alive! Or just bite off its tail.
Crazy Fish

Bournemouth, UK

#493 Jun 4, 2012
fanboys...

Since: Aug 11

France

#494 Jun 4, 2012
Spinosaurus Rex wrote:
I'm going with Levi. The largest whale Mega hunts is probably brygmophyseter. A whale is much smarter too!
Levi is a killer beast that kills anything disturbing it. Levi can just stun it with sonar and eat it alive! Or just bite off its tail.
Typically the guy who base his knowledge on JFC.

The ignorance on topic is frightening, especially at the Internet era.
qwert

Toronto, Canada

#495 Jun 4, 2012
Spinosaurus Rex wrote:
I'm going with Levi. The largest whale Mega hunts is probably brygmophyseter. A whale is much smarter too!
Levi is a killer beast that kills anything disturbing it. Levi can just stun it with sonar and eat it alive! Or just bite off its tail.
Yeah mega hunts whales. Levi is a whale. But the thing is mega's known only from teeth and backbones. I disagree.

Since: Aug 11

France

#496 Jun 4, 2012
Some guys on topix are terrifying of lack of science.

Meg only hunted Brygmo...
Levi eats everything...

Yeah, that's scientific !

Since: Aug 11

France

#497 Jun 4, 2012
I don't have time to explain why we cannot consider Livyatan being superior to Carcharocles using sources at now, as there are so much of them.

But there is this talk, not by an amateur, not by a 12 years fanboy, but a professional paleontologist :

Tip in YouTube Lamniforms Sharks 110 millions years of ocean supremacy.

By Dr Mike Siversson. 45 min

Hoping this will be an eye opener because some guys here are really ridiculous.
MattC

Dawsonville, GA

#498 Jul 23, 2012
ronald mcdonald wrote:
1) it's leviathan, not livyatan.
2)i doubt carch's bite was much more than 5t.
i would give this to leviathan at equal sizes. it (likely) has a stronger bite, and the teeth likely have enough power to go very deep into the flesh.
leviathan is also warm blooded, which *COULD* be an advantage.
on zee other hand, carch can rip out MASSIVE amounts of flesh in one bite, and does not have to go up for air.
it's close, but i say levi.
They went with the Hebrew spelling Livyatan because Leviathan was already a scientific name for a species of mammoths.

Since: Aug 11

France

#499 Aug 2, 2012
If Livyatan reached 17,5 m and we assume this is not the maximum size, it could be even superior to the gigantic C.megalodon.

But I think it is really hard to say at now.

We need more material from both.

And we'll have.
Sylvilagus aquaticus

Lake Forest, CA

#500 Aug 2, 2012
No, we won't!!
dude of death

Casar, NC

#501 Aug 19, 2012
megalodon would win. he has incredible speed and attacks from below similar to a great white. that would kill practically anything.
Norinco QBZ-95B

Lake Forest, CA

#502 Aug 19, 2012
Yes, yes it could.
Reality

Iowa City, IA

#503 Aug 20, 2012
Megalodon due to experience and damaging bite. 70% win for meg.
Doctor Retard

Lake Forest, CA

#507 Aug 20, 2012
Wait, why are my posts not showing up?

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