Local tech firm provides massive comp...

Local tech firm provides massive computing power | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 18 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Nov 22, 2010, titled Local tech firm provides massive computing power | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

CEO Jamie Busic, left, and President Michael Marlowe founded Bluemile Inc., where computer servers fill a floor of its Downtown headquarters.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

Since: Nov 10

Hilliard, OH

#1 Nov 22, 2010
Forty years ago, another group of young entrepreneurs had the same idea. It was called CompuServe...
Scary

Powell, OH

#2 Nov 22, 2010
Do the people who work there have security clearances? Can anyone off the street just work there?
JB-BM

Columbus, OH

#3 Nov 22, 2010
Yes, everyone goes through an extensive background check and yes CompuServe is a model we are well aware of that has provided a good deal of insight and inspiration.
Data Center Experience

Columbus, OH

#4 Nov 22, 2010
Paul - PCs decimated CompuServe's (original) business, as people moved away from the mainframe architecture. However, there's still only so much individual desktop machines can do, so there's room for this kind of "cloud" computing, especially as capacity requirements continue to grow.

I'm sure some big players will try to gobble up Bluemile in the future, just like what happened to CompuServe.

Scary... what's so scary about it? Why would people working in a cloud computing center need federal security clearances (which are only designed to clear you as a risk for espionage)? I imagine that any employees with access to data stored on the cloud are vetted before being given root privileges - and trust me, if all you have are regular user permissions, there is little you can do to read someone else's files if they secure them properly. I'm pretty sure Bluemile isn't just handing root privileges to some guy they just hired without checking his references and background.

Since: Nov 10

Hilliard, OH

#5 Nov 22, 2010
DCE - I worked for CompuServe from 1973 to 2000, so know the story intimately. While the timesharing era may have died, we figured out how to survive the minicomputer era as well as the PC era. It wasn't until the internet was opened to the public that our business model broke down. Still, from the perspective of our shareholders, it was a pretty good ride: HRB paid $20M for us in 1980 and sold us in 1998 for $1.2B, after we had generated a lot of profit in between.

PCs didn't take over - in the corporate world at least - because they were inherently better than mainframes. It was because corporate IT departments became such a pain to deal with. The mainframe shops consumed more and more money yet became less and less responsive to end users.

Most managers found that given a PC and Lotus 1-2-3-, they didn't need the mainframe guys so much. That was the beginning of the end (more)

Since: Nov 10

Hilliard, OH

#6 Nov 22, 2010
... but as Jeff Wilkins, the effective founder of CompuServe said, when you put a PC on your desk, you become an operations department as well. You have to install and upgrade software and hardware, do backups, fix broken hardware -- all that stuff the mainframe ops department took care of for you.

Guess what?'Cloud computing' again pushes the operations duties back to a central site, while also offering access to computing power that isn't economically feasible on the desktop.

So if you want to get out ahead of the curve, the trick is to project when the cloud computing shops become the bottleneck again, and folks once again return to personal computing devices. Design that device and you'll make a fortune.

Until the pendulum swings again...
Data Center Experience

Columbus, OH

#7 Nov 22, 2010
Agreed, Paul. CS adapted to the demise of the mainframe well. This kind of stuff does tend to be cyclical. I remember there was a lot of talk about a decade ago about hardware thin clients, and while they didn't really take off, *software* thin clients have; there are some pretty sophisticated web applications (I can't run Outlook on my Ubuntu laptop, but I can get nearly full capability via a web client).

“Defecting to Mexico”

Since: Sep 09

Location hidden

#8 Nov 22, 2010
JB-BM wrote:
Yes, everyone goes through an extensive background check and yes CompuServe is a model we are well aware of that has provided a good deal of insight and inspiration.
Can I have a job?
peaceisareality

Somerset, KY

#9 Nov 22, 2010
Net Guru wrote:
<quoted text>
Can I have a job?
May I have a job? "Can" is too pushy per HR.
Gary

Blacklick, OH

#10 Nov 22, 2010
Good for these guys & gals. Finally a feel good story reported rather than murders & the stinking OSU buckeyes.
Some Guy

Columbus, OH

#11 Nov 22, 2010
It is probably worth noting that some of the Dispatch's senior executives recently left to work for this company and the Dispatch recently(ish) moved much of their IT infrastructure to this company. There are in fact other Data Centers and Hosting companies in Columbus that have powerful infrastructures.

Knowledge is power
Another Guy

Anonymous Proxy

#12 Nov 23, 2010
Let's hope Tim Hayne's taxpayer-subsidized Platform Lab (now a supplier of co-lo services as well as a cloud provider) doesn't put Bluemile out of business.

“Defecting to Mexico”

Since: Sep 09

Location hidden

#13 Nov 23, 2010
peaceisareality wrote:
<quoted text>May I have a job? "Can" is too pushy per HR.
If that's the case then forget it.
Yeah Right

Powell, OH

#14 Nov 23, 2010
JB-BM wrote:
Yes, everyone goes through an extensive background check and yes CompuServe is a model we are well aware of that has provided a good deal of insight and inspiration.
They don't require their personnel to get security clearances! The Pentagon would probably not use their services.
Clueless

Powell, OH

#15 Nov 23, 2010
Data Center Experience wrote:
Paul - PCs decimated CompuServe's (original) business, as people moved away from the mainframe architecture. However, there's still only so much individual desktop machines can do, so there's room for this kind of "cloud" computing, especially as capacity requirements continue to grow.
I'm sure some big players will try to gobble up Bluemile in the future, just like what happened to CompuServe.
Scary... what's so scary about it? Why would people working in a cloud computing center need federal security clearances (which are only designed to clear you as a risk for espionage)? I imagine that any employees with access to data stored on the cloud are vetted before being given root privileges - and trust me, if all you have are regular user permissions, there is little you can do to read someone else's files if they secure them properly. I'm pretty sure Bluemile isn't just handing root privileges to some guy they just hired without checking his references and background.
Would you feel better if you knew that people you entrust your data and information to have security clearances? A security clearance investigation is more extensive than some rinky dink regular employment investigation. Everyone from the CEO to the CFO to the IT personnel, to the Janitor should have a security clearance. To not have one is bad for business and is unacceptable!
Marketing Genius

New Albany, OH

#16 Nov 24, 2010
I should create called GreenMile and compete with these people. Our motto would be, "The Write Way of Doing Business."
Data Center Experience

Columbus, OH

#17 Nov 24, 2010
Clueless wrote:
Would you feel better if you knew that people you entrust your data and information to have security clearances? A security clearance investigation is more extensive than some rinky dink regular employment investigation. Everyone from the CEO to the CFO to the IT personnel, to the Janitor should have a security clearance. To not have one is bad for business and is unacceptable!
Apparently you aren't aware of how federal security clearances work. For starters, you can't just ask for an investigation - you have to be working on a federal project where there is a reasonable expectation of handling classified data.(I should know - I had a clearance for ten years.) And investigations look for unusual ties to foreign countries, or things like financial trouble that provide an angle for a foreign agent to work you for state secrets.

Now, of COURSE if a company is going to store sensitive data with another company, they should choose a provider with adequate security measures. But that doesn't have to be a S or TS clearance.

I bet you store sensitive information in a safety deposit box. Do you require the bank you use to have federal security clearances for all personnel?

I'm pretty sure BM has an adequate vetting process to determine if applicants who would have access to the storage are reliable or not before handing them the keys. Just like every other place that provides similar services.
Barbara Welitzkin

Cherry Hill, NJ

#19 Dec 1, 2010
This is pure genius. Mazel tov regarding your innovative concepts and design of services.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Computer Science Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Lake Tahoe fire-spotting camera saw Washington ... Sat good and maybe bad 1
News IBM Opens First Cloud Data Center in Italy Jun 16 jaxwillis23 1
News Microsoft and other big names in tech are activ... Jun 3 Friend 1
News Linux creator says Windows, Os X, iOS and Andro... May '15 BADGER 2
News Large Study Finds MMR Vaccine Doesn't Cause Aut... May '15 GARDASIL MAIMS KILLS 32
News On This Day: British WWII Code Breaker Alan Tur... May '15 mrstan 5
News Product Review: MapInfo Professional Version 9.0 (Aug '07) May '15 alo 26
More from around the web