Tonga May Have Been a Vast Seafaring ...

Tonga May Have Been a Vast Seafaring Empire

There are 5 comments on the LiveScience story from Jul 23, 2014, titled Tonga May Have Been a Vast Seafaring Empire. In it, LiveScience reports that:

The seafaring empire of Tonga in the South Pacific Ocean once spanned more than a thousand miles, serving as the hub through which distant settlements exchanged artifacts and ideas, researchers say.

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jestr

Tonga

#1 Jul 25, 2014
Very true
fan of boru

Liverpool, Australia

#2 Jul 27, 2014
Called the "epicenter of the current global extinction," by Conservation International, this smattering of more than 4,000 South Pacific islands is at risk from both local human activity and global climate change.

Humans settled on these islands between 2,000 and 3,000 years ago. Since then, thousands of bird species have gone extinct, according to a 1989 review in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Hunting and agriculture helped usher these species into extinction, but invasive species played a major role. One of the worst offenders, according to a 1992 study in the journal Oryx, is the common rat, which preys on birds and reptiles alike.

While invasive species ravage the islands from the inside, global warming threatens from without. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a one-meter rise in sea level would submerge more than 4 square miles (10 square kilometers) of the 100-square mile (257-square kilometer) island of Tongatapu, Tonga. The surging ocean waters from a typical tropical storm would swamp an additional 27 square kilometers. Other low-lying islands face similar fates.

“Fight For Democracy in Tonga!!”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#3 Dec 15, 2014
Called the "epicenter of the current global extinction," by Conservation International, this smattering of more than 4,000 South Pacific islands is at risk from both local human activity and global climate change.

Humans settled on these islands between 2,000 and 3,000 years ago. Since then, thousands of bird species have gone extinct, according to a 1989 review in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Hunting and agriculture helped usher these species into extinction, but invasive species played a major role. One of the worst offenders, according to a 1992 study in the journal Oryx, is the common rat, which preys on birds and reptiles alike.

While invasive species ravage the islands from the inside, global warming threatens from without. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a one-meter rise in sea level would submerge more than 4 square miles (10 square kilometers) of the 100-square mile (257-square kilometer) island of Tongatapu, Tonga. The surging ocean waters from a typical tropical storm would swamp an additional 27 square kilometers. Other low-lying islands face similar fates.
jestr

Tonga

#4 Dec 16, 2014
boruone77 wrote:
Called the "epicenter of the current global extinction," by Conservation International, this smattering of more than 4,000 South Pacific islands is at risk from both local human activity and global climate change.
Humans settled on these islands between 2,000 and 3,000 years ago. Since then, thousands of bird species have gone extinct, according to a 1989 review in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Hunting and agriculture helped usher these species into extinction, but invasive species played a major role. One of the worst offenders, according to a 1992 study in the journal Oryx, is the common rat, which preys on birds and reptiles alike.
While invasive species ravage the islands from the inside, global warming threatens from without. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a one-meter rise in sea level would submerge more than 4 square miles (10 square kilometers) of the 100-square mile (257-square kilometer) island of Tongatapu, Tonga. The surging ocean waters from a typical tropical storm would swamp an additional 27 square kilometers. Other low-lying islands face similar fates.
Saw some wingless bird running around my uta at vaini. Looked bit slim and too fast to eat so i think that one safe from extinction by tongan umu.
uiha

United States

#5 Dec 16, 2014
The Great Tongan people were like a voracious virus that spread n infect n multiplied ,n take over anything n everything,The. Tongan was compared to a cancer virus,it spread throughout polynesia,uninhibited,it just gobbled up everything in its path,thus creating a vast paramount empire ,in other words our ancestors were BAAAAD MADAFAKAS HEHEHEHE LITERALLY

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