Maya civilization's collapse linked t...

Maya civilization's collapse linked to climate change: study

There are 38 comments on the Reuters story from Nov 9, 2012, titled Maya civilization's collapse linked to climate change: study. In it, Reuters reports that:

For a clue to the possible impact of climate change on modern society, a study suggests a look back at the end of classic Maya civilization, which disintegrated into famine, war and collapse as a long-term wet weather pattern shifted to drought.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Reuters.

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Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#21 Nov 12, 2012
responder wrote:
<quoted text>
Funny: I saw the Dark Ages Cold Period listed 300-700 CE. Looks like the droughts were starting about the time the Cold Period was ending, at least in Europe. Wouldn't a WARM period more likely lead to droughts, too?
And aren't you supposing a lot about what's going on in an industrial world based on what happened in a far more sparsely-populated, PRE-industrial world? Does huamn activity even factor in to your beliefs?
Many local droughts and climate change periods have occurred all over the world throughout human civilization. They're not particularly relevant to whether humans cause warming or not.
Don't rely on wiki for your information.

No, warmer periods usually have more precipitation. Colder periods have more drought. It's a function of ocean evaporation.

We were speaking of the demise of the Maya. I stated that the end of the dominant culture coincided with the Dark Ages Cold Period.

Man can and does impact his local area. Just build a large city with lots of concrete and you will raise the temperature. Put in a hydro dam and inundate a valley and you will impact the local climate. Deforestation does the same thing.
PHD

Overton, TX

#22 Nov 12, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't rely on wiki for your information.
No, warmer periods usually have more precipitation. Colder periods have more drought. It's a function of ocean evaporation.
We were speaking of the demise of the Maya. I stated that the end of the dominant culture coincided with the Dark Ages Cold Period.
Man can and does impact his local area. Just build a large city with lots of concrete and you will raise the temperature. Put in a hydro dam and inundate a valley and you will impact the local climate. Deforestation does the same thing.
So the responders answer is pointless.
harvey

Columbus, OH

#23 Nov 13, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't rely on wiki for your information.
No, warmer periods usually have more precipitation. Colder periods have more drought. It's a function of ocean evaporation.
We were speaking of the demise of the Maya. I stated that the end of the dominant culture coincided with the Dark Ages Cold Period.
Man can and does impact his local area. Just build a large city with lots of concrete and you will raise the temperature. Put in a hydro dam and inundate a valley and you will impact the local climate. Deforestation does the same thing.
Don't 'refute' claims by attacking the source. As to your claim about warmer periods, here's a statement from a skeptical site:

"In considering the above studies, it appears that the Dark Ages Cold Period in North America was a time of both relative coolness and wetness, much like the Little Ice Age was in this part of the world."

http://www.co2science.org/subject/d/summaries...

You are apparently incorrect that the demise of the Maya coincided with the Medieval Cold Period, or that it had anything to do with the regional droughts which contributed to that demise.
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#24 Nov 14, 2012
harvey wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't 'refute' claims by attacking the source. As to your claim about warmer periods, here's a statement from a skeptical site:
"In considering the above studies, it appears that the Dark Ages Cold Period in North America was a time of both relative coolness and wetness, much like the Little Ice Age was in this part of the world."
http://www.co2science.org/subject/d/summaries...
You are apparently incorrect that the demise of the Maya coincided with the Medieval Cold Period, or that it had anything to do with the regional droughts which contributed to that demise.
Yes, so the collapse of the Maya coincided with the Dark Ages Cold Period. Isn't that what I said.

No, the Maya didn't live in Alberta, Canada. The climate of the Maya didn't look like the Chesapeake Bay area. Each part of our world will have various levels of precipitation. Drought is the most often cited natural disaster to impact the Maya collapse. Just as it did three hundred years later with the Anasazi.

My area is in a drought, the UK has had very wet and soggy summer conditions. So are we in a drought or time of above average precipitation. Averaging weather doesn't really work.
responder

Columbus, OH

#25 Nov 14, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, so the collapse of the Maya coincided with the Dark Ages Cold Period. Isn't that what I said.
No, the Maya didn't live in Alberta, Canada. The climate of the Maya didn't look like the Chesapeake Bay area. Each part of our world will have various levels of precipitation. Drought is the most often cited natural disaster to impact the Maya collapse. Just as it did three hundred years later with the Anasazi.
My area is in a drought, the UK has had very wet and soggy summer conditions. So are we in a drought or time of above average precipitation. Averaging weather doesn't really work.
LOL

[I contradict Fun Facts' version of reality]

Fun Facts:'Isn't that what I said?'

No, it wasn't....:)
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#26 Nov 14, 2012
responder wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL
[I contradict Fun Facts' version of reality]
Fun Facts:'Isn't that what I said?'
No, it wasn't....:)
http://www.co2science.org/articles/V8/N50/C2....
PHD

Overton, TX

#27 Nov 15, 2012
Day three the experts said warm weather no rain. And this is the third day of cold weather and more rain. Gee must be the responder and its expert predictions on the weather.
PHD

Overton, TX

#28 Nov 15, 2012
Day three the experts said warm weather no rain. And this is the third day of cold weather and more rain. Gee must be the respunger and its expert predictions on the weather.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

#29 Nov 15, 2012
PHD wrote:
Day three the experts said warm weather no rain. And this is the third day of cold weather and more rain. Gee must be the respunger and its expert predictions on the weather.
Climate change means that the weather is LESS predictable. Ergo Meteorology will get it wrong more often because past climate patterns no longer apply. Do you have any POINT to your post?
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#30 Nov 15, 2012
This is very interesting and time to add a little perspective.

The Dark Ages Cold Period just happens to coincide with what is called a Bond Event. This is thought to be part of a quasi 1500 year climate cycle. More refined, at about 1470 years, some estimates at 1430. These events are a few hundred years in duration so an exact time of onset is a little difficult.

When these events happen we experience very cold periods. You can see these periods in the historic record of the holocene and the climate's impact on civilizations.

We are 1500 years, approx, from the last Bond Event. Our sun is going into minimum. If history repeats itself, we are in for a cold period.

Written history tells us that the DACP was accompanied by much cloud cover.'Dark' is indicative of the experience of the people of Europe. Clouds blocking the sun. When solar activity is low the solar systems heliosphere shrinks. This allows for more cosmic rays to enter our system and more cosmic rays result in more cloud cover.

Take a look at history, notice how cold temps and famine appear to follow this 1500 year cycle.

If you ignore history, you do so at your peril.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

#32 Nov 15, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
If you ignore history, you do so at your peril.
Inventing 'natural cycles' based on nothing but conjecture and fuzzy correlation studies is much more risky.

By the way, the actual name is Dansgaard–Oeschger events and it represents a cyclical and opposing warming vs cooling of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. This was defined LONG before Bond. And it has no effect on GLOBAL temperatures.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dansgaard%E2%80%...
PHD

Overton, TX

#33 Nov 15, 2012
LessHypeMoreFact wrote:
<quoted text>
Inventing 'natural cycles' based on nothing but conjecture and fuzzy correlation studies is much more risky.
By the way, the actual name is Dansgaard–Oeschger events and it represents a cyclical and opposing warming vs cooling of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. This was defined LONG before Bond. And it has no effect on GLOBAL temperatures.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dansgaard%E2%80%...
Your own words summarize your post. Your post is conjecture and nothing more. Now if you can remove yourself from the cut and paste do show all your work.
responder

Columbus, OH

#34 Nov 15, 2012
LessHypeMoreFact wrote:
<quoted text>
Inventing 'natural cycles' based on nothing but conjecture and fuzzy correlation studies is much more risky.
By the way, the actual name is Dansgaard–Oeschger events and it represents a cyclical and opposing warming vs cooling of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. This was defined LONG before Bond. And it has no effect on GLOBAL temperatures.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dansgaard%E2%80%...
As I believe you referred to it, bafflegab. Nothing but pseudoscience, silliness, and solar cycles. He thinks it impresses people, I guess.
PHD

Overton, TX

#35 Nov 15, 2012
responder wrote:
<quoted text>
As I believe you referred to it, bafflegab. Nothing but pseudoscience, silliness, and solar cycles. He thinks it impresses people, I guess.
Something simple would impress someone simple minded as you .Oh yes unlike you we do think.
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#36 Nov 16, 2012
LessHypeMoreFact wrote:
<quoted text>
Inventing 'natural cycles' based on nothing but conjecture and fuzzy correlation studies is much more risky.
By the way, the actual name is Dansgaard–Oeschger events and it represents a cyclical and opposing warming vs cooling of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. This was defined LONG before Bond. And it has no effect on GLOBAL temperatures.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dansgaard%E2%80%...
The first statement in your reference:

"Dansgaard–Oeschger events (often abbreviated D–O events) are rapid climate fluctuations that occurred 25 times during the last glacial period. Some scientists (see below) claim that the events occur quasi-periodically with a recurrence time being a multiple of 1,470 years, but this is debated. The comparable climate cyclicity during the Holocene is referred to as Bond events."
Fun Facts

Las Cruces, NM

#37 Nov 16, 2012
responder wrote:
<quoted text>
As I believe you referred to it, bafflegab. Nothing but pseudoscience, silliness, and solar cycles. He thinks it impresses people, I guess.
Did you see this?

http://www.co2science.org/articles/V8/N50/C2....

"Thereafter, however, there was a gradual drying of the climate; and their data from Lake Zempoala indicate that "the interval from 1300 to 1100 cal yr BP was driest and represents an extreme since the mid-Holocene," noting further that this interval of 200 years "coincides with the collapse of the Maya civilization."
responder

Columbus, OH

#38 Nov 16, 2012
Fun Facts wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you see this?
http://www.co2science.org/articles/V8/N50/C2....
"Thereafter, however, there was a gradual drying of the climate; and their data from Lake Zempoala indicate that "the interval from 1300 to 1100 cal yr BP was driest and represents an extreme since the mid-Holocene," noting further that this interval of 200 years "coincides with the collapse of the Maya civilization."
Yes, drying of the climate is what we call a 'drought,' and evidently played a major role in the collapse of Mayan civilization.

I knew this, but thanks anyway.
PHD

Overton, TX

#39 Nov 17, 2012
responder wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, drying of the climate is what we call a 'drought,' and evidently played a major role in the collapse of Mayan civilization.
I knew this, but thanks anyway.
Do tell all with your own work how you know.

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