Assad Says Public Support Assures He ...

Assad Says Public Support Assures He Will Continue to Lead Syria

There are 29 comments on the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette story from Jul 9, 2012, titled Assad Says Public Support Assures He Will Continue to Lead Syria. In it, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that:

BEIRUT, Lebanon President Bashar al-Assad of Syria said in an interview on German television that public support for his rule meant he would remain in office, and maintained that victims of violence among government supporters, including the military, outnumbered those among civilians killed in the Syria conflict.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

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Syrian

San Diego, CA

#1 Jul 9, 2012
100% true!! The majority of Syrians back Assad, and if an election were held Assad would win. These "rebels" are fueled by despicable outside instigators who are trying to effect "regime change" in Syria.
George

Red Deer, Canada

#2 Jul 9, 2012
Syrian wrote:
100% true!! The majority of Syrians back Assad, and if an election were held Assad would win. These "rebels" are fueled by despicable outside instigators who are trying to effect "regime change" in Syria.
Then why is Assad such a coward about having a totally free election, one without his security and army intimidating people to vote, they should only be at poles for the safety of Syrians that show up to vote note to influence who they vote for. If the people thought he would allow that they would have shown up for the last election which was a sham as predicted. you cannot have an election where all the people running are of the same party.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#3 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
Then why is Assad such a coward about having a totally free election, one without his security and army intimidating people to vote, they should only be at poles for the safety of Syrians that show up to vote note to influence who they vote for. If the people thought he would allow that they would have shown up for the last election which was a sham as predicted. you cannot have an election where all the people running are of the same party.
Syria is a Moslem country in the Middle East. European style parliamentary democracy would not fit there. It is not part of their cultural heritage. Perhaps you should spend less time dreaming of western imperial rule? We have no business telling the rest of the world how they should govern themselves.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#4 Jul 9, 2012
Me thinks "George" would like to lead the next crusade. We have no business going around trying to topple regimes in the MOslem world on a whim.

That sort of activity only breeds anti-western terrorists.
George

Red Deer, Canada

#5 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
<quoted text>
Syria is a Moslem country in the Middle East. European style parliamentary democracy would not fit there. It is not part of their cultural heritage. Perhaps you should spend less time dreaming of western imperial rule? We have no business telling the rest of the world how they should govern themselves.
So you obviously do not believe a fair election should be taken and the rule of the gun and knife is the way to become the leader?

These people are trying to get change not stay with the same policies that have been there for 40 years. The NTC got over 80% favorable vote in Libya, that says the people are happy with the outcome of the revolt and given a chance I would be willing to say so would the people of Syria.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#6 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
So you obviously do not believe a fair election should be taken and the rule of the gun and knife is the way to become the leader?
These people are trying to get change not stay with the same policies that have been there for 40 years. The NTC got over 80% favorable vote in Libya, that says the people are happy with the outcome of the revolt and given a chance I would be willing to say so would the people of Syria.
It is Syria... not Sweden.

Either Syria has a strong leader or you have an unstable mess with rival terrorist groups running wild. Remember Lebanon's civil war? To obtain stability the next leader would need to govern "the Assad way".

Western style parliamentary democracy simply does not work in the Arab world. Not their culture.
George

Red Deer, Canada

#7 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
<quoted text>
It is Syria... not Sweden.
Either Syria has a strong leader or you have an unstable mess with rival terrorist groups running wild. Remember Lebanon's civil war? To obtain stability the next leader would need to govern "the Assad way".
Western style parliamentary democracy simply does not work in the Arab world. Not their culture.
Yes this is Syria, did you ever stop and think that through education, reading and word of mouth middle Eastern people want something different, they are saying no more tyrants, no more working as slaves, they want a change, not the US or Russia pushing a change on them the people of Syria like Libya are standing up and saying no more and I agree if that is what the people want they have a right to be heard.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#8 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes this is Syria, did you ever stop and think that through education, reading and word of mouth middle Eastern people want something different, they are saying no more tyrants, no more working as slaves, they want a change, not the US or Russia pushing a change on them the people of Syria like Libya are standing up and saying no more and I agree if that is what the people want they have a right to be heard.
You are quite correct. The people of Syria do not want the USA, the EU or the UN unwisely trying to topple their government. That part of the world has a long history dealing with such "western crusaders".

We should stay out. If anything we should support stability over change. Any change in leadership likely means an end to moderate nationalist Baathist rule and a takover by the Islamic radicals.
George

Red Deer, Canada

#9 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
<quoted text>
You are quite correct. The people of Syria do not want the USA, the EU or the UN unwisely trying to topple their government. That part of the world has a long history dealing with such "western crusaders".
We should stay out. If anything we should support stability over change. Any change in leadership likely means an end to moderate nationalist Baathist rule and a takover by the Islamic radicals.
Nope, I disagree. Supporting the stability is supporting the opression of the people. Yes there are some people that like that style of life where all decisions are made for them but what about the other half. A good leader should recognize that 50% of his people are unhappy and look at ways of stabilizing the country. If Assad was this type of person I would agree with you but he is not, he believes if his guns do not control the crowd he just needs to use bigger guns.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#10 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
Nope, I disagree. Supporting the stability is supporting the opression of the people. Yes there are some people that like that style of life where all decisions are made for them but what about the other half. A good leader should recognize that 50% of his people are unhappy and look at ways of stabilizing the country. If Assad was this type of person I would agree with you but he is not, he believes if his guns do not control the crowd he just needs to use bigger guns.
The same could have been said about Abraham Lincoln. Obviously if a nation is in danger of falling apart... it needs a strong leader to hold it together.
Syrian

San Diego, CA

#11 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
<quoted text>
Syria is a Moslem country in the Middle East. European style parliamentary democracy would not fit there. It is not part of their cultural heritage. Perhaps you should spend less time dreaming of western imperial rule? We have no business telling the rest of the world how they should govern themselves.
EXACTLY uther!!! I could not have said it better myself!!
George

Red Deer, Canada

#12 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
<quoted text>
The same could have been said about Abraham Lincoln. Obviously if a nation is in danger of falling apart... it needs a strong leader to hold it together.
I agree with strong leadership and there are many leaders in Syria so I am not worried about a new leader, Assad is not strong just devious and cruel.
George

Red Deer, Canada

#13 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
Me thinks "George" would like to lead the next crusade. We have no business going around trying to topple regimes in the MOslem world on a whim.
That sort of activity only breeds anti-western terrorists.
OK, how do you propose the government to help the 50% of Syria that does not like him and wants change?

I would love a challenge of working with dynamic people that want a change and are willing to work together for it.
Syrian

San Diego, CA

#14 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
Nope, I disagree. Supporting the stability is supporting the opression of the people. Yes there are some people that like that style of life where all decisions are made for them but what about the other half. A good leader should recognize that 50% of his people are unhappy and look at ways of stabilizing the country. If Assad was this type of person I would agree with you but he is not, he believes if his guns do not control the crowd he just needs to use bigger guns.
Totally disagree. Violent bloody upheavals create total instability, and can allow extremist and terrorist organizations to seize power. Do you want the US in another 10 year war against extremists, just like in Afghanistan? Arab Islamic nations do not want Westerners dictating to them what to do, and definitely do not want Western forces on their soil. The West needs to just stay the hell out of the Middle East, and let the Arabs handle their own affairs.
George

Red Deer, Canada

#15 Jul 9, 2012
Syrian wrote:
<quoted text> Totally disagree. Violent bloody upheavals create total instability, and can allow extremist and terrorist organizations to seize power. Do you want the US in another 10 year war against extremists, just like in Afghanistan? Arab Islamic nations do not want Westerners dictating to them what to do, and definitely do not want Western forces on their soil. The West needs to just stay the hell out of the Middle East, and let the Arabs handle their own affairs.
Who said anything about the US in the war, I know you think Israel is influencing the war but that is not true either. The US is not in this war. Iam making the point that a government must recognize that 50% of his country wants a change, do you think Assad recognizes that, I think not, he just sends in bigger bombs and that is definately not what the country of Syria wants.

We know that both sides will not set their weapons down, so how do you think the peace can be found??

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#16 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
OK, how do you propose the government to help the 50% of Syria that does not like him and wants change?
I would love a challenge of working with dynamic people that want a change and are willing to work together for it.
Let us be honest here. About 50% of Americans dislike Obama. They hate everything he does. We call them Republicans. Similarly about 50% of Americans hated Bush. We call those Democrats.

So what if only half the country approves of...(-:
George

Red Deer, Canada

#17 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
<quoted text>
Let us be honest here. About 50% of Americans dislike Obama. They hate everything he does. We call them Republicans. Similarly about 50% of Americans hated Bush. We call those Democrats.
So what if only half the country approves of...(-:
Well I agree with you, however as you put it earlier this is not the US nor Europe so we are looking for a Middle Eastern bandaid so they stop killing each other and innocent civilians that do not want to fight. The only way I can see a peace solution is a transition government until both sides of the fight agree to a new leader as 50% do not trust him and maybe more now and they would rather fight to the death than support him.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#18 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
Well I agree with you, however as you put it earlier this is not the US nor Europe so we are looking for a Middle Eastern bandaid so they stop killing each other and innocent civilians that do not want to fight. The only way I can see a peace solution is a transition government until both sides of the fight agree to a new leader as 50% do not trust him and maybe more now and they would rather fight to the death than support him.
Would not the best solution be for the Syrians to decide their own future... and for everyone else to mind their own business?

We should stay out of other people's internal revolutions.
ObserverTM

United States

#19 Jul 9, 2012
George wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes this is Syria, did you ever stop and think that through education, reading and word of mouth middle Eastern people want something different, they are saying no more tyrants, no more working as slaves, they want a change, not the US or Russia pushing a change on them the people of Syria like Libya are standing up and saying no more and I agree if that is what the people want they have a right to be heard.
Oh, Jesus. You sound like the back of a bubble gum wrapper issued to our troops, so they don't forget why they're fighting.

I support Russia's stance that evolution is always preferable to revolution, as they themselves learned from bitter experience.

Why do you think fomenting civil war is the best way to achieve your stated goals? Why does the opposition refuse to sign on to the accords reached in Geneva if those accords directly addressed the orderly transition to a representative government? Encouraging, enabling and supporting by material means a civil war is ridiculous on its face and frankly a crime that should be dealt with by the ICC.
ObserverTM

United States

#20 Jul 9, 2012
uther pendragon wrote:
<quoted text>
Let us be honest here. About 50% of Americans dislike Obama. They hate everything he does. We call them Republicans. Similarly about 50% of Americans hated Bush. We call those Democrats.
So what if only half the country approves of...(-:
I don't know about those stats. I think about 50% of Republicans called Bush a dumbo behind his back. ;-)

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