Russians condemn slaying of rights lawyer

Jan 22, 2009 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Buffalo News

With a policeman's boots seen in the foreground, people lay flowers Tuesday, Jan.

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1 - 20 of 30 Comments Last updated Jan 28, 2009
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Maksim

New York, NY

#1 Jan 22, 2009
Not very good PR for Kremlin. 3 jornalists working for the same newspaper killed in last 5 years all related to exposing corruption, yet no reaction from Kremlin..

Since: Jan 09

Novokuznetsk

#2 Jan 22, 2009
I condemn this act too. This lawyer worked for parents of killed Chechen girl on Budanov's case. It's not Kremlin, more likely it's army, cause he is a colonel(if I remember it right).
Maksim

New York, NY

#3 Jan 23, 2009
Dmitry wrote:
I condemn this act too. This lawyer worked for parents of killed Chechen girl on Budanov's case. It's not Kremlin, more likely it's army, cause he is a colonel(if I remember it right).
Well, in most of the western countries such killing would have triggered public outrage from authorities, calling the reporter and the laywer heroes and perhaps even calling for a national day of mourning. In Kremlin, they give this as much attention as a murder resulting from a drunken bar fight.
fascist chetnik

Tampere, Finland

#4 Jan 23, 2009
Dmitry wrote:
I condemn this act too. This lawyer worked for parents of killed Chechen girl on Budanov's case. It's not Kremlin, more likely it's army, cause he is a colonel(if I remember it right).
So you admit that the Russian army is corrupt?
fascist chetnik

Tampere, Finland

#5 Jan 23, 2009
Dmitry wrote:
I condemn this act too. This lawyer worked for parents of killed Chechen girl on Budanov's case. It's not Kremlin, more likely it's army, cause he is a colonel(if I remember it right).
You think Budanov is the only soldier who did bad things in Chechnya? I"ve talk to a alot of chechens and they don"t say many nice things about you russians. Wonder why? Plus many german boys have a russian grandfather because Soviet Union Red Army raped over 2 million german women during WW2. Russians are untermenschen.

Since: Oct 08

Vladimir, Russia

#6 Jan 25, 2009
fascist chetnik wrote:
<quoted text>
...Plus many german boys have a russian grandfather because Soviet Union Red Army raped over 2 million german women during WW2. Russians are untermenschen.
While reading the posts I still hoped that no scum would worm into here and spoil the topic with its mental slops. Alas, these hopes failed. Well, shit happens, you know...

As for the German women, you spoke to them, too, or just read yourself up with the so-called works by some mediacrap-makers? And if you truly believe in it why do you openly call a big part of Europeans genetic Untermenschen. Do you have any personal claims against Russians or you get money for your antirussian rhetorics? Or, perhaps, you're just naturally stupid? What do you, a Finnish citizen, have in common with the people of Caucasus that you discussed the Chechen war with them? And if you inferred anything from those contacts why not share it with us?

Instead, you still keep to plain and banal abuse thus insulting your own country much more than Russians.

Anyway you got to be more attentive and read the article again or else you call Russians, i.e. people who DO condemn this murder, Untermenschen. So, who are you, a nazi? I suspect you are, which doesn't place your nation in a good light. Why do you hate your country?
peter

Kitchener, Canada

#7 Jan 25, 2009
Dmitry wrote:
I condemn this act too. This lawyer worked for parents of killed Chechen girl on Budanov's case. It's not Kremlin, more likely it's army, cause he is a colonel(if I remember it right).
Regardless wheather it was the russian army or someone else what steps has the russian gov't taken to fix this issue of lawyers, journalists getting killed in the middle of the street in bright daylight?
Stefanya

Pleasantville, NJ

#8 Jan 25, 2009
Dmitry wrote:
I condemn this act too. This lawyer worked for parents of killed Chechen girl on Budanov's case. It's not Kremlin, more likely it's army, cause he is a colonel(if I remember it right).
Could also be FSB. Regardless, it seems to be a
covert act of an organized group. perhaps at a high level. Perhaps linked to a group responsible for killing journalists, etc. it is a right wing, hardcore group. Someone at a very level must be given the selective orders.
Jazz singer

UK

#9 Jan 25, 2009
Tommy_Young wrote:
<quoted text>
While reading the posts I still hoped that no scum would worm into here and spoil the topic with its mental slops. Alas, these hopes failed. Well, shit happens, you know...
As for the German women, you spoke to them, too, or just read yourself up with the so-called works by some mediacrap-makers? And if you truly believe in it why do you openly call a big part of Europeans genetic Untermenschen. Do you have any personal claims against Russians or you get money for your antirussian rhetorics? Or, perhaps, you're just naturally stupid? What do you, a Finnish citizen, have in common with the people of Caucasus that you discussed the Chechen war with them? And if you inferred anything from those contacts why not share it with us?
Instead, you still keep to plain and banal abuse thus insulting your own country much more than Russians.
Anyway you got to be more attentive and read the article again or else you call Russians, i.e. people who DO condemn this murder, Untermenschen. So, who are you, a nazi? I suspect you are, which doesn't place your nation in a good light. Why do you hate your country?
You are correct: we do have a NAZI on this forum, who calls himself "fascist chetnik" to boot.

A proponent of Nazi values, who calls allies leaders in WWII war criminals. He also tries to alter historical facts to suit his twisted agenda.

I suspect the subject is not Finn at all, but most likely from the Balkans, just assuming an identity. In any case, he is a poor specimen of his country, Finns are generally more moderate in their judgement.
Jazz singer

UK

#10 Jan 25, 2009
There are indications showing a Chechen plot to eliminate journalists or opponents of President Kadyrov, which has nothing to do with the Kremlin at all.

The accused in the murder of Anna Poly.... were found to be acting from Chechnya, with no involvement from the Moscow.
Jazz singer

UK

#11 Jan 25, 2009
Murder of lawyer shocks Russians

By James Rodgers
BBC News, Moscow

The double murder of a top human rights lawyer and a journalist in Moscow has reinforced the fears of those who say that in Russia words alone can put you in mortal danger.
"His murder shows that those who speak out against abuses and work to hold abusers to account risk their lives," Rachel Denber of Human Rights Watch says of the death of the lawyer, Stanislav Markelov.
A journalist who was wounded in the attack which killed Mr Markelov later died of her injuries. The dead reporter, Anastasia Baburova, was with Mr Markelov when - investigators say - a masked gunman shot him in the head. After shooting Mr Markelov, the gunman shot her.
Anastasia Baburova was a trainee with the newspaper Novaya Gazeta.
The paper specialises in human rights stories, and used to employ Anna Politkovskaya, the investigative reporter who was herself murdered in 2006.

Chechnya files
If this killing has shocked Moscow, it is mainly because it is not the first. The newspaper Izvestiya lists other victims - including Ms Politkovskaya - and asks "who's next?"

The newspaper front pages with the body lying in the street, or in a bullet-riddled car, are not as common as they were at the height of Moscow's "wild east" era in the 1990s.
Nevertheless, a relatively new presidential administration dedicated to strengthening the rule of law has been unable to stop them.
In September last year, Ruslan Yamadayev, a member of a prominent Chechen family, was shot dead as his car stood at traffic lights in central Moscow. That attack took place at rush hour - almost in the shadow of the main offices of the Russian government, and the British embassy.
Mr Markelov had worked on numerous high-profile human rights cases. Most famously, he represented the family of Elza Kungayeva, a Chechen woman killed by a Russian army officer in 2000. Elza Kungayeva - who was known as Kheda to her family - was murdered by Colonel Yuri Budanov.
Mr Markelov had campaigned against Yuri Budanov's early release. But last week, a court ruled that he could go free.
The court decision led to protests in Chechnya, a volatile North Caucasus republic deeply scarred by heavy fighting between Russian forces and separatist rebels since 1994.

Critics silenced
At the time of his death, Mr Markelov was also involved in the case of a newspaper editor from Khimki near Moscow. The editor, Mikhail Beketov, was severely beaten by unknown assailants.

Investigators conducting the murder inquiry are working on the assumption that the killing was linked to Mr Markelov's work.
"We are looking into every possible theory, but the main one is linked to the job of the victim," Anatoly Bagmet, head of the Moscow department of the Russian Investigative Committee, told the Interfax news agency.
Russia's liberal Yabloko Party had a bleak assessment of the significance of the killing. "This murder shows that political murder becomes the decisive factor in Russia's social life, and the use of force - the main argument against a personality," the party said in a statement.
Nicola Duckworth, a Europe and Central Asia specialist at Amnesty International, called Stanislav Markelov's murder "a despicable crime".
"The Russian authorities must take decisive steps to show that such crimes will not be tolerated. Silencing those who defend human rights and work to uphold the rule of law is absolutely unacceptable," she said.
Mr Markelov's supporters will be watching the investigation closely. Its progress will inevitably be seen as a sign of how serious the authorities here really are about making those graphic, grim front pages a thing of the past.
Stefanya

Pleasantville, NJ

#12 Jan 25, 2009
Jazz singer wrote:
Murder of lawyer shocks Russians
By James Rodgers
BBC News, Moscow
The double murder of a top human rights lawyer and a journalist in Moscow has reinforced the fears of those who say that in Russia words alone can put you in mortal danger.
"His murder shows that those who speak out against abuses and work to hold abusers to account risk their lives," Rachel Denber of Human Rights Watch says of the death of the lawyer, Stanislav Markelov.
A journalist who was wounded in the attack which killed Mr Markelov later died of her injuries. The dead reporter, Anastasia Baburova, was with Mr Markelov when - investigators say - a masked gunman shot him in the head. After shooting Mr Markelov, the gunman shot her.
Anastasia Baburova was a trainee with the newspaper Novaya Gazeta.
The paper specialises in human rights stories, and used to employ Anna Politkovskaya, the investigative reporter who was herself murdered in 2006.
Chechnya files
If this killing has shocked Moscow, it is mainly because it is not the first. The newspaper Izvestiya lists other victims - including Ms Politkovskaya - and asks "who's next?"
The newspaper front pages with the body lying in the street, or in a bullet-riddled car, are not as common as they were at the height of Moscow's "wild east" era in the 1990s.
Nevertheless, a relatively new presidential administration dedicated to strengthening the rule of law has been unable to stop them.
In September last year, Ruslan Yamadayev, a member of a prominent Chechen family, was shot dead as his car stood at traffic lights in central Moscow. That attack took place at rush hour - almost in the shadow of the main offices of the Russian government, and the British embassy.
Mr Markelov had worked on numerous high-profile human rights cases. Most famously, he represented the family of Elza Kungayeva, a Chechen woman killed by a Russian army officer in 2000. Elza Kungayeva - who was known as Kheda to her family - was murdered by Colonel Yuri Budanov.
Mr Markelov had campaigned against Yuri Budanov's early release. But last week, a court ruled that he could go free.
The court decision led to protests in Chechnya, a volatile North Caucasus republic deeply scarred by heavy fighting between Russian forces and separatist rebels since 1994.
Critics silenced
At the time of his death, Mr Markelov was also involved in the case of a newspaper editor from Khimki near Moscow. The editor, Mikhail Beketov, was severely beaten by unknown assailants.
Investigators conducting the murder inquiry are working on the assumption that the killing was linked to Mr Markelov's work.
"We are looking into every possible theory, but the main one is linked to the job of the victim," Anatoly Bagmet, head of the Moscow department of the Russian Investigative Committee, told the Interfax news agency.
Russia's liberal Yabloko Party had a bleak assessment of the significance of the killing. "This murder shows that political murder becomes the decisive factor in Russia's social life, and the use of force - the main argument against a personality," the party said in a statement.
Nicola Duckworth, a Europe and Central Asia specialist at Amnesty International, called Stanislav Markelov's murder "a despicable crime".
"The Russian authorities must take decisive steps to show that such crimes will not be tolerated. Silencing those who defend human rights and work to uphold the rule of law is absolutely unacceptable," she said.
Mr Markelov's supporters will be watching the investigation closely. Its progress will inevitably be seen as a sign of how serious the authorities here really are about making those graphic, grim front pages a thing of the past.
Sounds like Mexico!!
Stefanya

Pleasantville, NJ

#13 Jan 25, 2009
Jazz singer wrote:
There are indications showing a Chechen plot to eliminate journalists or opponents of President Kadyrov, which has nothing to do with the Kremlin at all.
The accused in the murder of Anna Poly.... were found to be acting from Chechnya, with no involvement from the Moscow.
So says the Kremlin!
Stefanya

Pleasantville, NJ

#14 Jan 25, 2009
Jazz singer wrote:
Murder of lawyer shocks Russians
By James Rodgers
BBC News, Moscow
The double murder of a top human rights lawyer and a journalist in Moscow has reinforced the fears of those who say that in Russia words alone can put you in mortal danger.
"His murder shows that those who speak out against abuses and work to hold abusers to account risk their lives," Rachel Denber of Human Rights Watch says of the death of the lawyer, Stanislav Markelov.
A journalist who was wounded in the attack which killed Mr Markelov later died of her injuries. The dead reporter, Anastasia Baburova, was with Mr Markelov when - investigators say - a masked gunman shot him in the head. After shooting Mr Markelov, the gunman shot her.
Anastasia Baburova was a trainee with the newspaper Novaya Gazeta.
The paper specialises in human rights stories, and used to employ Anna Politkovskaya, the investigative reporter who was herself murdered in 2006.
Chechnya files
If this killing has shocked Moscow, it is mainly because it is not the first. The newspaper Izvestiya lists other victims - including Ms Politkovskaya - and asks "who's next?"
The newspaper front pages with the body lying in the street, or in a bullet-riddled car, are not as common as they were at the height of Moscow's "wild east" era in the 1990s.
Nevertheless, a relatively new presidential administration dedicated to strengthening the rule of law has been unable to stop them.
In September last year, Ruslan Yamadayev, a member of a prominent Chechen family, was shot dead as his car stood at traffic lights in central Moscow. That attack took place at rush hour - almost in the shadow of the main offices of the Russian government, and the British embassy.
Mr Markelov had worked on numerous high-profile human rights cases. Most famously, he represented the family of Elza Kungayeva, a Chechen woman killed by a Russian army officer in 2000. Elza Kungayeva - who was known as Kheda to her family - was murdered by Colonel Yuri Budanov.
Mr Markelov had campaigned against Yuri Budanov's early release. But last week, a court ruled that he could go free.
The court decision led to protests in Chechnya, a volatile North Caucasus republic deeply scarred by heavy fighting between Russian forces and separatist rebels since 1994.
Critics silenced
At the time of his death, Mr Markelov was also involved in the case of a newspaper editor from Khimki near Moscow. The editor, Mikhail Beketov, was severely beaten by unknown assailants.
Investigators conducting the murder inquiry are working on the assumption that the killing was linked to Mr Markelov's work.
"We are looking into every possible theory, but the main one is linked to the job of the victim," Anatoly Bagmet, head of the Moscow department of the Russian Investigative Committee, told the Interfax news agency.
Russia's liberal Yabloko Party had a bleak assessment of the significance of the killing. "This murder shows that political murder becomes the decisive factor in Russia's social life, and the use of force - the main argument against a personality," the party said in a statement.
Nicola Duckworth, a Europe and Central Asia specialist at Amnesty International, called Stanislav Markelov's murder "a despicable crime".
"The Russian authorities must take decisive steps to show that such crimes will not be tolerated. Silencing those who defend human rights and work to uphold the rule of law is absolutely unacceptable," she said.
Mr Markelov's supporters will be watching the investigation closely. Its progress will inevitably be seen as a sign of how serious the authorities here really are about making those graphic, grim front pages a thing of the past.

Sounds like mexico!
Stefanya

Pleasantville, NJ

#15 Jan 25, 2009
Jazz singer wrote:
There are indications showing a Chechen plot to eliminate journalists or opponents of President Kadyrov, which has nothing to do with the Kremlin at all.
The accused in the murder of Anna Poly.... were found to be acting from Chechnya, with no involvement from the Moscow.
So says the believable Kremlin!
Maksim

New York, NY

#16 Jan 25, 2009
Jazz singer wrote:
There are indications showing a Chechen plot to eliminate journalists or opponents of President Kadyrov, which has nothing to do with the Kremlin at all.
The accused in the murder of Anna Poly.... were found to be acting from Chechnya, with no involvement from the Moscow.
Hmm, kill someone, then say that your enemy killed him. Very believable.
Jazz singer

UK

#17 Jan 25, 2009
Maksim wrote:
<quoted text>
Hmm, kill someone, then say that your enemy killed him. Very believable.
There is no better way to discredit your enemy that to implicate him in a murder, no?

If everyone, in the West at least, straightaway point the finger to the Kremlin, what better way to embarass the government?

Western media are so quick to accuse Putin or the FSB, that you just have to commit the crime, the ever raging Russophobia does the rest.

I can't really see what would be the point for the Russian government to assassinate opponents, journalists or others. There are so many ways for them to influence the media without getting their hands dirty.

Strange that so many journalists connected with investigations in Chechnya end up being killed. Russia has hardly anything to do in Chechnya for the last 3 years: the pro-Russian Kadyrov government runs the republic which is largely autonomous now.

Anna Poli...(what's her name) apparently incovered attrocities and killings not committed to the Russian army (although undeniably there were some too), but directly attributed to the Kadyrov clan.

Kadyrov has eliminated most of his opponents among the Chechen warlords, and it's probably among his entourage that the mastermind is; not in the Kremlin at all.

“Privet”

Since: Apr 07

Big Lake, Alaska USA

#18 Jan 25, 2009
I know who did it. Of course it was Berezovsky!

Kremlin always blames everything on Berezovsky so why not these latest blatant FSB crimes also?
Stefanya

Pleasantville, NJ

#19 Jan 25, 2009
Jazz singer wrote:
<quoted text>
There is no better way to discredit your enemy that to implicate him in a murder, no?
If everyone, in the West at least, straightaway point the finger to the Kremlin, what better way to embarass the government?
Western media are so quick to accuse Putin or the FSB, that you just have to commit the crime, the ever raging Russophobia does the rest.
I can't really see what would be the point for the Russian government to assassinate opponents, journalists or others. There are so many ways for them to influence the media without getting their hands dirty.
Strange that so many journalists connected with investigations in Chechnya end up being killed. Russia has hardly anything to do in Chechnya for the last 3 years: the pro-Russian Kadyrov government runs the republic which is largely autonomous now.
Anna Poli...(what's her name) apparently incovered attrocities and killings not committed to the Russian army (although undeniably there were some too), but directly attributed to the Kadyrov clan.
Kadyrov has eliminated most of his opponents among the Chechen warlords, and it's probably among his entourage that the mastermind is; not in the Kremlin at all.
You are fibbing again! The government sanctioned it!

Since: Jan 09

Novokuznetsk

#20 Jan 25, 2009
Why_Me wrote:
I know who did it. Of course it was Berezovsky!
Kremlin always blames everything on Berezovsky so why not these latest blatant FSB crimes also?
Lol. Berezovsky is Russian Bin Laden, you see. He did almost nothing, but it's easy to blame on him.

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