Roma Families Forced Out of Their Serbian Homes

Serbian authorities evicted five Roma families from their Belgrade homes Thursday, leaving about 20 people homeless, including 10 children. Full Story
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hmm

Santa Clara, CA

#1 Aug 13, 2011
Serbian authorities evicted five Roma families from their Belgrade homes Thursday, leaving about 20 people homeless, including 10 children.

Living in a building on Skadarska Street in the Serbian capital, the Gypsies were forcibly removed from their residences without being offered "adequate alternative housing." The families were told to remove all of their possessions from the building.

A June 29 court order legalized the action, which human rights organizations have quickly condemned.

The Roma, also known as the Romani or Gypsies, form an ethnic group widely dispersed across Europe. Traditionally a traveling community with its roots traced to India, the Romani peoples are oft subject to extreme, institutionalized persecution.

“Once again, authorities in Belgrade are uprooting Roma families and pushing them out on the streets without providing adequate alternative housing,” Nicola Duckworth, Amnesty International’s Europe and Central Asia Program Director, said in a press release.

“This unacceptable practice must not continue, and the authorities must do more to seek out adequate housing solutions to ensure Roma families can bring up their children in safety and with dignity.”

According to an Amnesty report, Serbia has been violating international standards on forced evictions since 2009, and the government has failed to protect the human rights of evicted persons. There are anywhere between 250,000 to 500,000 Roma in the country.

Facing de facto discrimination in most European countries, the Gypsy community is economically troubled, and many Romani live in slums, shanty-towns or in substandard housing. This is true in Serbia, and in Belgrade there are as many as 100 informal settlements spread across the city. More than one third of the Gypsies in the capital live in these communities.

In the past, these settlements have been subject to forced eviction and displacement all across Europe.

Last year, the Romanian city of Cluj-Napoca evicted 56 Romani families from their homes in the city center without giving them sufficient advanced notice. In June, Roma were relocated in the Czech Republic, and in April three Gypsy communities were evicted outside of Rome.

Last month, the local government of the city of Baia Mare in northern Romania announced it's plans to erect a concrete wall in front of a Roma neighborhood. The wall would separate the community from a main road, and human rights groups are saying that it is a government instituted attempt to "ghettoize" an ethnic community.

"Such initiatives belong to the Nazi era," the Center for Legal Resources said in an open letter to Baia Mare mayor Catalin Chereches.

"The idea to separate a community with severe social problems... amounts to institutionalized racism."

“I'm here, what now?”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#2 Aug 13, 2011
and who said hitler was dead...???

“I love the liberty of speech”

Since: May 11

Bangkok

#3 Aug 13, 2011
fiesty ireland wrote:
and who said hitler was dead...???
He's not dead, he's killing Palestinians, Iraqians, Afghanistans, Libyans somewhere :)
Anyway, guess the question is: their home was it really their house/property?!

http://my-google-gadgets.blogspot.com
Anonymous

Corfu, NY

#4 Aug 15, 2011
hmm wrote:
Serbian authorities evicted five Roma families from their Belgrade homes Thursday, leaving about 20 people homeless, including 10 children.
Living in a building on Skadarska Street in the Serbian capital, the Gypsies were forcibly removed from their residences without being offered "adequate alternative housing." The families were told to remove all of their possessions from the building.
A June 29 court order legalized the action, which human rights organizations have quickly condemned.
The Roma, also known as the Romani or Gypsies, form an ethnic group widely dispersed across Europe. Traditionally a traveling community with its roots traced to India, the Romani peoples are oft subject to extreme, institutionalized persecution.
“Once again, authorities in Belgrade are uprooting Roma families and pushing them out on the streets without providing adequate alternative housing,” Nicola Duckworth, Amnesty International’s Europe and Central Asia Program Director, said in a press release.
“This unacceptable practice must not continue, and the authorities must do more to seek out adequate housing solutions to ensure Roma families can bring up their children in safety and with dignity.”
According to an Amnesty report, Serbia has been violating international standards on forced evictions since 2009, and the government has failed to protect the human rights of evicted persons. There are anywhere between 250,000 to 500,000 Roma in the country.
Facing de facto discrimination in most European countries, the Gypsy community is economically troubled, and many Romani live in slums, shanty-towns or in substandard housing. This is true in Serbia, and in Belgrade there are as many as 100 informal settlements spread across the city. More than one third of the Gypsies in the capital live in these communities.
In the past, these settlements have been subject to forced eviction and displacement all across Europe.
Last year, the Romanian city of Cluj-Napoca evicted 56 Romani families from their homes in the city center without giving them sufficient advanced notice. In June, Roma were relocated in the Czech Republic, and in April three Gypsy communities were evicted outside of Rome.
Last month, the local government of the city of Baia Mare in northern Romania announced it's plans to erect a concrete wall in front of a Roma neighborhood. The wall would separate the community from a main road, and human rights groups are saying that it is a government instituted attempt to "ghettoize" an ethnic community.
"Such initiatives belong to the Nazi era," the Center for Legal Resources said in an open letter to Baia Mare mayor Catalin Chereches.
"The idea to separate a community with severe social problems... amounts to institutionalized racism."
This is Serbian 'mild justice.'

“I'm here, what now?”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#5 Aug 16, 2011
personally I think it's despicable and although I have opinions about any one who is not contributing to society in a positive manner, I believe the above subject matter is proof that xenophobia and discrimination is alive and kicking and also I am horrified that nothing is being done about this, other countries are allowing this to happen just like the British gov allowed the holocaust to happen. I can't believe that humans are being so inhumane.
Faith

New Baltimore, MI

#6 Aug 16, 2011
The Gypsies are beggars and thieves. The Serbs have every right to throw them out.
curious

Santa Clara, CA

#7 Aug 16, 2011
The Serbs are war criminal and rapists. Their neighbors have every right to throw them out.
Faith

New Baltimore, MI

#8 Aug 16, 2011
NATO should have given the Serbs more time.
curious

Santa Clara, CA

#9 Aug 16, 2011
To do what, run?

“I'm here, what now?”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#10 Aug 17, 2011
curious wrote:
To do what, run?
good answer! love it....
H R W

Belgrade, Serbia

#11 Aug 18, 2011
fiesty ireland wrote:
and who said hitler was dead...???
The specific Romani families were occupying someone else's private property and I believe that according to the law it's a crime. Still, they has been treated as someone who default and goes thought the process of foreclosure. Good enough?
Anonymous

Buffalo, NY

#12 Aug 18, 2011
H R W wrote:
<quoted text>
The specific Romani families were occupying someone else's private property and I believe that according to the law it's a crime. Still, they has been treated as someone who default and goes thought the process of foreclosure. Good enough?
Usually, the Serbs have explanation and justification for anything and everything. They are 'never wrong!'

“BOJKOT SRPSKIH PROIZVODA”

Since: Jul 08

BOYCOTT SERBIAN PRODUCTS

#13 Aug 18, 2011
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text> Usually, the Serbs have explanation and justification for anything and everything. They are 'never wrong!'
War criminals re always right.
sajo

Toronto, Canada

#14 Aug 18, 2011
since everyone here is a genius who has never stepped foot into Serbia answer me this- if you fail to pay your rent, in the US or anywhere in the world, or perhaps refuse to pay it, will your landlord let you live there? try it and then you will know from experience, like these families that were evicted.
Or how about this. You get a loan from your bank to purchase a home and you fail to pay off your home in time, what will the bank do?
These are simple laws and policies my country has adopted from the west. I don't deny that the Roma are discriminated against but this eviction has nothing to do with discrimination. If it did, then they wouldn't be allowed to live there in the first place.

It's great how countries like France, Germany and Britain deport all their Roma to countries like Romania and Serbia and then they criticize these countries for not helping the Roma. Germany alone has more than enough capital to get every last Roma off the streets and integrated into society as working class citizens, yet Germany would rather deport these people to other places which are exponentially poorer than nations such as Germany or France and expect them to provide free housing for them. Now that is nothing short of Nazism and discrimination.

To make the situation even worse for Serbia, during the war the Roma of Kosovo, BiH and Croatia were forced out of these places into Serbia, which saw a huge rise in the Roma population. How is Serbia supposed to help a certain 400 000 people who refuse to help themselves when the country has been suffering from economic turmoil since the 90s?

A fund needs to be set up to help the Roma integrate into mainstream society so that they can send their children to school, find jobs and purchase homes and food. Putting pressure on some of the poorest countries in the region and expecting results is ridiculous.
H R W

Belgrade, Serbia

#15 Aug 19, 2011
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text> Usually, the Serbs have explanation and justification for anything and everything. They are 'never wrong!'
As usual you are running around and trolling every thread. If something was unclear to you ask and I'll explain, otherwise find other poster to chat with.
H R W

Belgrade, Serbia

#17 Aug 19, 2011
sajo wrote:
since everyone here is a genius who has never stepped foot into Serbia answer me this- if you fail to pay your rent, in the US or anywhere in the world, or perhaps refuse to pay it, will your landlord let you live there? try it and then you will know from experience, like these families that were evicted.
Or how about this. You get a loan from your bank to purchase a home and you fail to pay off your home in time, what will the bank do?
These are simple laws and policies my country has adopted from the west. I don't deny that the Roma are discriminated against but this eviction has nothing to do with discrimination. If it did, then they wouldn't be allowed to live there in the first place.
I just want to clarify something. Romani families from the initial article weren't paying rent nor lease to the owner of the property, but illegally lived in that house (BTW, Skadarska st., municipality Stari Grad is downtown Belgrade and one of the tourist attractions).

When it comes to ethnic minority rights and Romani people, Serbia has the highest standards in the region.

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“BOJKOT SRPSKIH PROIZVODA”

Since: Jul 08

BOYCOTT SERBIAN PRODUCTS

#19 Aug 19, 2011
sajo wrote:
since everyone here is a genius who has never stepped foot into Serbia answer me this- if you fail to pay your rent, in the US or anywhere in the world, or perhaps refuse to pay it, will your landlord let you live there? try it and then you will know from experience, like these families that were evicted.
Or how about this. You get a loan from your bank to purchase a home and you fail to pay off your home in time, what will the bank do?
These are simple laws and policies my country has adopted from the west. I don't deny that the Roma are discriminated against but this eviction has nothing to do with discrimination. If it did, then they wouldn't be allowed to live there in the first place.
It's great how countries like France, Germany and Britain deport all their Roma to countries like Romania and Serbia and then they criticize these countries for not helping the Roma. Germany alone has more than enough capital to get every last Roma off the streets and integrated into society as working class citizens, yet Germany would rather deport these people to other places which are exponentially poorer than nations such as Germany or France and expect them to provide free housing for them. Now that is nothing short of Nazism and discrimination.
To make the situation even worse for Serbia, during the war the Roma of Kosovo, BiH and Croatia were forced out of these places into Serbia, which saw a huge rise in the Roma population. How is Serbia supposed to help a certain 400 000 people who refuse to help themselves when the country has been suffering from economic turmoil since the 90s?
A fund needs to be set up to help the Roma integrate into mainstream society so that they can send their children to school, find jobs and purchase homes and food. Putting pressure on some of the poorest countries in the region and expecting results is ridiculous.
I once went through Serbia and saw Serbs behaving like animals, honest to God.

“I'm here, what now?”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#20 Aug 21, 2011
sajo wrote:
since everyone here is a genius who has never stepped foot into Serbia answer me this- if you fail to pay your rent, in the US or anywhere in the world, or perhaps refuse to pay it, will your landlord let you live there? try it and then you will know from experience, like these families that were evicted.
Or how about this. You get a loan from your bank to purchase a home and you fail to pay off your home in time, what will the bank do?
These are simple laws and policies my country has adopted from the west. I don't deny that the Roma are discriminated against but this eviction has nothing to do with discrimination. If it did, then they wouldn't be allowed to live there in the first place.
It's great how countries like France, Germany and Britain deport all their Roma to countries like Romania and Serbia and then they criticize these countries for not helping the Roma. Germany alone has more than enough capital to get every last Roma off the streets and integrated into society as working class citizens, yet Germany would rather deport these people to other places which are exponentially poorer than nations such as Germany or France and expect them to provide free housing for them. Now that is nothing short of Nazism and discrimination.
To make the situation even worse for Serbia, during the war the Roma of Kosovo, BiH and Croatia were forced out of these places into Serbia, which saw a huge rise in the Roma population. How is Serbia supposed to help a certain 400 000 people who refuse to help themselves when the country has been suffering from economic turmoil since the 90s?
A fund needs to be set up to help the Roma integrate into mainstream society so that they can send their children to school, find jobs and purchase homes and food. Putting pressure on some of the poorest countries in the region and expecting results is ridiculous.
while very true I have never been to Serbia however I can read and that article says nothing about the Roma squatting there illegally. my opinion is based on the contents of the article. I'm not looking for a fight either, just saying that the article says nothing about them being on property illegally.
Mariusz

Bucharest, Romania

#21 Aug 22, 2011
fiesty ireland wrote:
<quoted text>
while very true I have never been to Serbia however I can read and that article says nothing about the Roma squatting there illegally. my opinion is based on the contents of the article. I'm not looking for a fight either, just saying that the article says nothing about them being on property illegally.
scum ,for majority of them ,its a lovely word. ask Ala.

“I'm here, what now?”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#22 Aug 22, 2011
Mariusz wrote:
<quoted text>scum ,for majority of them ,its a lovely word. ask Ala.
who scum?? has Ala not told you how easy it is to confuse me :D lol

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