The Appalachian Magickal Tradition

The Appalachian Magickal Tradition

There are 178 comments on the www.associatedcontent.com story from Feb 20, 2008, titled The Appalachian Magickal Tradition. In it, www.associatedcontent.com reports that:

Appalachian traditional magick has long been a mysterious craft, even amongst the pagan community.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.associatedcontent.com.

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“Here to stay!”

Since: Oct 07

Pasco, WA

#1 Feb 20, 2008
Interesting.. I have never heard of it.

“Just Li'l ol' me....LiLi”

Since: Jun 07

Like many others

#2 Feb 20, 2008
Ahhhhhhhhhh......Welcome to my life and my world. <grin>

This is how it is in my family! lol! Seriously... it is. When you see me speak of my "Family Tradition"...this is what it is. I was raised in this.And just like the article says, we (my family) never referred to ourselves as "Witches" and no one else (outside the family) called us "Witches" either...(at least not to our faces! LOL!) for all of us it has always been "just the way things are done". We are known by many names: Yarbman/woman, root doctors, Granny Women, Herbmen/women, "Grannies", Folk Healers, Mountain Healers..to name a few. If you have not heard it referred to as "The Appalachian Magickal Tradition", you may have heard it referred to as "Folk Magic(k)". In some areas it is known as "HooDoo" or "PowWow" (and it has nothing to do with the Native American gatherings called "Pow-wows"), though, many consider HooDoo and PowWow to be "cousins" of Appalachian Traditions.

“Here to stay!”

Since: Oct 07

Pasco, WA

#3 Feb 21, 2008
I have heard of folk magik and HooDoo but have never practiced it. Sounds like a wonderful tradition.

Blessings
PaganLogic

“I will not go quietly.”

Since: Feb 07

Indianapolis Indiana

#4 Feb 21, 2008
LiLi LaVeau wrote:
Ahhhhhhhhhh......Welcome to my life and my world. <grin>
This is how it is in my family! lol! Seriously... it is. When you see me speak of my "Family Tradition"...this is what it is. I was raised in this.And just like the article says, we (my family) never referred to ourselves as "Witches" and no one else (outside the family) called us "Witches" either...(at least not to our faces! LOL!) for all of us it has always been "just the way things are done". We are known by many names: Yarbman/woman, root doctors, Granny Women, Herbmen/women, "Grannies", Folk Healers, Mountain Healers..to name a few. If you have not heard it referred to as "The Appalachian Magickal Tradition", you may have heard it referred to as "Folk Magic(k)". In some areas it is known as "HooDoo" or "PowWow" (and it has nothing to do with the Native American gatherings called "Pow-wows"), though, many consider HooDoo and PowWow to be "cousins" of Appalachian Traditions.
Oh yeah. My Grandmother described herself as a "good Christian woman" but she "knew things". "Witchin" warts off of fingers, catnip tea to "cure" a colicky baby.... She said her grandmother was called a "country doctor" and she learned some things from her, but I couldn't get her to teach me anything of it...

Since: Apr 07

United States

#5 Feb 21, 2008
Pagan and Proud wrote:
<quoted text>Oh yeah. My Grandmother described herself as a "good Christian woman" but she "knew things". "Witchin" warts off of fingers, catnip tea to "cure" a colicky baby.... She said her grandmother was called a "country doctor" and she learned some things from her, but I couldn't get her to teach me anything of it...
That's the sad irony of it, P&P.
There are many that would greatly honor the knowledge,but weren't born into it, or in my case,my 'teacher'(great grandmother)died when I was 12. I know some,but yearn for much more.

Since: Apr 07

United States

#6 Feb 21, 2008
It seems that while with other trads,each generation knows more than the one before. We have lost much of the knowledge that our great grandmothers' took for granted in their everyday lives. Very sad.

“Just Li'l ol' me....LiLi”

Since: Jun 07

Like many others

#7 Feb 21, 2008
Pagan and Proud wrote:
<quoted text>Oh yeah. My Grandmother described herself as a "good Christian woman" but she "knew things". "Witchin" warts off of fingers, catnip tea to "cure" a colicky baby.... She said her grandmother was called a "country doctor" and she learned some things from her, but I couldn't get her to teach me anything of it...
In the parlance of my neck of the woods....

....thas 'cause you is a boy child honey.

Where I live, grandMOTHERS traditionally do not share their craft with male offspring....that's work for grandFATHERS, fathers, uncles and other males. Your grandmother probably also saw a very real division between "women's knowings" and "men's knowings" and never were the gender boundaries crossed in teaching the "knowings". I am fortunate enough in my family that we don't have such strick rules regarding gender based knowledge.

"Country Doctor"...goodness gracious I haven't heard *that* "calling" since I was a little girl and my Granny Shaw was still alive. lol! I guess you could have called my grandmother a "country doctor" too..she always had *something* brewing on the back eye of her stove; but most of the neighbors just called her "the granny woman up the road".

“Just Li'l ol' me....LiLi”

Since: Jun 07

Like many others

#8 Feb 21, 2008
speak little_listen much wrote:
It seems that while with other trads,each generation knows more than the one before. We have lost much of the knowledge that our great grandmothers' took for granted in their everyday lives. Very sad.
Once again you speak so well and so true for one who "speaks little and listens much". It is sad that we are losing/have lost so very much. I am thankful for having been raised in my tradition and for having been adopted into two other families so that I may learn their ways to pass along in time. I'm also thankful that my grandmothers left me their "cookbooks"!

“Just Li'l ol' me....LiLi”

Since: Jun 07

Like many others

#9 Feb 21, 2008
PaganLogic wrote:
I have heard of folk magik and HooDoo but have never practiced it. Sounds like a wonderful tradition.
Blessings
PaganLogic
Oh it is! But I never knew it WAS a tradition and I never knew we WERE Witches until I was a grown woman! For us...it was "just the way things are done." LOL.

“Rescue a dog, save a life”

Since: Jun 07

Allentown, Lehighton, now WV

#10 Feb 22, 2008
LiLi LaVeau wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh it is! But I never knew it WAS a tradition and I never knew we WERE Witches until I was a grown woman! For us...it was "just the way things are done." LOL.
Good Morning Lili!

Same here in my family; my grandmother was also a 'good Christian lady' that always had cures on the stove for someone or other. Back then, she just classified herself as a 'white witch' or Pow-wow healer. Everyone, even her minister and his wife consulted her for advice.:-)

Too bad she passed so early. I would have loved to learn more from her. Unfortunately (for me) she stressed I learn my 'schooling' first. I'm so happy for you that you got to learn from yours and inherit the cookbooks!

“I will not go quietly.”

Since: Feb 07

Indianapolis Indiana

#11 Feb 22, 2008
LiLi LaVeau wrote:
<quoted text>
In the parlance of my neck of the woods....
....thas 'cause you is a boy child honey.
Where I live, grandMOTHERS traditionally do not share their craft with male offspring....that's work for grandFATHERS, fathers, uncles and other males. Your grandmother probably also saw a very real division between "women's knowings" and "men's knowings" and never were the gender boundaries crossed in teaching the "knowings". I am fortunate enough in my family that we don't have such strick rules regarding gender based knowledge.
"Country Doctor"...goodness gracious I haven't heard *that* "calling" since I was a little girl and my Granny Shaw was still alive. lol! I guess you could have called my grandmother a "country doctor" too..she always had *something* brewing on the back eye of her stove; but most of the neighbors just called her "the granny woman up the road".
Well, we didn't have any "men's knowings" that I'm aware of...

“Gra Dilseacht Cairdeas”

Since: Feb 08

Appleton, WI

#12 Feb 22, 2008
LiLi and Mountain Gramma,

Natalia has been sharing some of her ways/learnings with those of us not blessed enough to have Wise Women in the family. Would the 2 of you be willing to do the same?? I'd be eternally grateful!

“Just Li'l ol' me....LiLi”

Since: Jun 07

Like many others

#13 Feb 22, 2008
Triquetra wrote:
LiLi and Mountain Gramma,
Natalia has been sharing some of her ways/learnings with those of us not blessed enough to have Wise Women in the family. Would the 2 of you be willing to do the same?? I'd be eternally grateful!
I will share what I can share, Triquetra....as stated..many of the teachings can only be shared among family members. There are some things that can be given freely though.

“Gra Dilseacht Cairdeas”

Since: Feb 08

Appleton, WI

#14 Feb 22, 2008
LiLi LaVeau wrote:
<quoted text>
I will share what I can share, Triquetra....as stated..many of the teachings can only be shared among family members. There are some things that can be given freely though.
Thank you.

“Rescue a dog, save a life”

Since: Jun 07

Allentown, Lehighton, now WV

#15 Feb 23, 2008
Triquetra wrote:
LiLi and Mountain Gramma,
Natalia has been sharing some of her ways/learnings with those of us not blessed enough to have Wise Women in the family. Would the 2 of you be willing to do the same?? I'd be eternally grateful!
Thankyou Triquetra, I only wish I could, but as I stated, it was mostly lost before I could learn. We'll just have to depend on our Lili, and learn together.:-)

“Dance with Fire- Boycott BS”

Since: Apr 07

Moon

#16 Feb 23, 2008
I have no knowledge of any folk magic on my dad's side of the family (the side that lives in the Appalachians)... but who doesn't remember their great grandmother with a touch of magic? She called the pastor the storyteller!

And.. no hints of it either on my mom's (mom's) side in Germany either. The war just bleached all that away.

But, one of my coveners remembers a few interesting bits (a grandfather keening over a sick child for instance) and her family was Pentecostal, so they did things like seething...

And, there are some local people around here who will share their 'energy work' knowledge from their heritage with the some of us.

It drives me crazy on the Asheville forums and such to hear the fundies complain that ALL the Pagans & Wiccans and such were imported in by 'yankees'.'liberals' etc.

It's like um... no a lot of people who know folk magic from their families came to know about Paganism in college and such, and now they are back in their homeland... what did you think attracted the Pagans who DID come here from somewhere else in the first place?! Hellooo... you might want to look a little further into your own mountain family tree before griping about so-called outsiders!

“Gra Dilseacht Cairdeas”

Since: Feb 08

Appleton, WI

#18 Feb 23, 2008
CShine wrote:
I have no knowledge of any folk magic on my dad's side of the family (the side that lives in the Appalachians)... but who doesn't remember their great grandmother with a touch of magic? She called the pastor the storyteller!
And.. no hints of it either on my mom's (mom's) side in Germany either. The war just bleached all that away.
But, one of my coveners remembers a few interesting bits (a grandfather keening over a sick child for instance) and her family was Pentecostal, so they did things like seething...
And, there are some local people around here who will share their 'energy work' knowledge from their heritage with the some of us.
It drives me crazy on the Asheville forums and such to hear the fundies complain that ALL the Pagans & Wiccans and such were imported in by 'yankees'.'liberals' etc.
It's like um... no a lot of people who know folk magic from their families came to know about Paganism in college and such, and now they are back in their homeland... what did you think attracted the Pagans who DID come here from somewhere else in the first place?! Hellooo... you might want to look a little further into your own mountain family tree before griping about so-called outsiders!
I really wonder if I could find it in my family tree. My Grandma's family was all Scottish and they were from Kentucky. My Grandfather's family was all Irish and were from Oklahoma. The closest I've come was Great Grandma in Oklahoma--she had the big kitchen, canned, baked, etc. My maternal grandma was czech and great with cooking and had plants everywhere. But none of these great women even hinted at family traditions to pass down. I think people came to Great Grandma sometimes, but, she belonged to one of those fire and brimstone churches in which the preacher actual yells at you through the sermon, so none of it was passed down. Still, being in Oklahoma always felt different than being with any other family members.

“I will not go quietly.”

Since: Feb 07

Indianapolis Indiana

#19 Feb 23, 2008
Triquetra wrote:
<quoted text>
But none of these great women even hinted at family traditions to pass down. I think people came to Great Grandma sometimes, but, she belonged to one of those fire and brimstone churches in which the preacher actual yells at you through the sermon, so none of it was passed down. Still, being in Oklahoma always felt different than being with any other family members.
Ah, yes, the Pentecostal preachers, my grandma went to one of those churches as well. You never actually understand the concept of mass delusion/hysteria until you attend one of those and watch them shouting, running, speaking in tongues, and all the rest...(I say mass delusion/hysteria because if one started, half the crowd "fell out", there was never just one individual that did all that on their own during a sermon.)

“Just Li'l ol' me....LiLi”

Since: Jun 07

Like many others

#20 Feb 23, 2008
Triquetra wrote:
<quoted text>
Thank you.
You're welcome....and as soon as I'm over this damnable "tummy bug" I have..I'll share. I'm heading back to bed now.

Since: Apr 07

United States

#21 Feb 23, 2008
CShine wrote:
I have no knowledge of any folk magic on my dad's side of the family (the side that lives in the Appalachians)... but who doesn't remember their great grandmother with a touch of magic? She called the pastor the storyteller!
And.. no hints of it either on my mom's (mom's) side in Germany either. The war just bleached all that away.
But, one of my coveners remembers a few interesting bits (a grandfather keening over a sick child for instance) and her family was Pentecostal, so they did things like seething...
And, there are some local people around here who will share their 'energy work' knowledge from their heritage with the some of us.
It drives me crazy on the Asheville forums and such to hear the fundies complain that ALL the Pagans & Wiccans and such were imported in by 'yankees'.'liberals' etc.
It's like um... no a lot of people who know folk magic from their families came to know about Paganism in college and such, and now they are back in their homeland... what did you think attracted the Pagans who DID come here from somewhere else in the first place?! Hellooo... you might want to look a little further into your own mountain family tree before griping about so-called outsiders!
I know what you mean,C-Shine.

I think labeling Pagans
as "others"(yankees,lib erals,etc...) is a comfort measure so that they can reassure themselves that we are very different from them.

I've noticed in this area when they speak of Paganism,and they rarely do.("Ignore it,and it will go away" mentality) They "blame" it on yoga,TM,and other Eastern influences.
Not the traditions brought by their Scottish,Irish,English,and Germans ancestors,combined with the ways of the Tsaragi. That would hit way too close to home!

I've made another observation about hard core fundies. They rarely walk in the woods.

My theory is that because the Mother Forest that runs the length of central Appalachia gives off such a strong vibration/energy,it's almost impossible for them to ignore.

It's much easier to deny/dismiss something that you have never experienced.

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