Mormon Church Getting Money from Casi...

Mormon Church Getting Money from Casinos - Why isn't Marriott Excommunicated???

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Sterling

Kansas City, MO

#1 Oct 10, 2009
Bill Marriott is the son of the founder of Marriott International, and the current CEO of the company, clearly with power to regulate his hotels. He's also a member of the 6th Quorum of the Seventy, a high-ranking position in the LDS Church.

Why is it that Bill Marriott is a Mormon who is allowed to run a business with services that Mormons don't condone without getting excommunicated, and at least not being allowed to hold a temple recommend??

This makes no sense to me. A friend of mine got excommunicated for opening a bar. This guy has the following services in his hotels (you can look all of this up yourself if you want to):

-Bars
-Casinos
-Adult videos

Here's some of the wording on Marriott.com that is used to entice people to stay at their hotels:

-Non-stop gambling
-Blocks from LGBT nightlife (For those of you who don't know, this means lesbian, gay, bi, trans)
-In-house bars
-Special adult packages
-When planning your trip to your favorite casino, choose Marriott, the leader in the hospitality industry. We offer the accommodations you're looking for at fine resorts IN a casino of your choice.

How is it that this man is allowed to run this corporation and be a member of the Seventy, when my friend opened up a bar and got excommunicated?

Mormons, explain please.
Sterling

Kansas City, MO

#2 Oct 10, 2009
Can't answer this one, can you Mormons?
Art

Riverside, CA

#3 Oct 11, 2009
Sterling wrote:
Can't answer this one, can you Mormons?
Maybe your friend got excommunicated for something other than opening a bar. There's alot of information left out of your story.
Pahoran

Auckland, New Zealand

#4 Oct 11, 2009
Sterling,

Since we have no way to check up on your anonymous friend's story, it cannot be used as any sort of baseline. Sorry.

As for Marriott hotels: they are a publicly listed company. The company only owns a small number of the hotels that carry the Marriott name. The CEO answers to the board, which makes the actual policy decisions.

Not that I agree with all of those decisions, BTW.

Regards,
Pahoran
Sterling

Kansas City, MO

#5 Oct 11, 2009
Art wrote:
<quoted text>
Maybe your friend got excommunicated for something other than opening a bar. There's alot of information left out of your story.
Nope. That's it. He opened a bar and was told that what he was doing was against the word of wisdom, that he was profiting from evil and encouraging others to break the word of wisdom.

Funny how a guy who brings millions in the church and has political pull can do it, but if you're not bringing in the big bucks, you can't.
Sterling

Kansas City, MO

#6 Oct 11, 2009
Pahoran wrote:
Sterling,
Since we have no way to check up on your anonymous friend's story, it cannot be used as any sort of baseline. Sorry.
As for Marriott hotels: they are a publicly listed company. The company only owns a small number of the hotels that carry the Marriott name. The CEO answers to the board, which makes the actual policy decisions.
Not that I agree with all of those decisions, BTW.
Regards,
Pahoran
Then wouldn't you think that the church would encourage him to resign his position as CEO? Or is money more important than values?
Pahoran

Auckland, New Zealand

#7 Oct 11, 2009
Sterling wrote:
<quoted text>
Nope. That's it. He opened a bar and was told that what he was doing was against the word of wisdom, that he was profiting from evil and encouraging others to break the word of wisdom.
Funny how a guy who brings millions in the church and has political pull can do it, but if you're not bringing in the big bucks, you can't.
As I said: the story is anonymous. What he told you that someone else told him is hearsay.

That pretty much means it's worthless as evidence.
Sterling wrote:
<quoted text>
Then wouldn't you think that the church would encourage him to resign his position as CEO? Or is money more important than values?
No-one in the Church has ever discussed my employment choices with me; I would be rather surprised if such choices were discussed with anyone, short of actually engaging in illegal or immoral acts.

There is no evidentiary support for the double standard you want to believe is there. Sorry.

Regards,
Pahoran

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#8 Oct 11, 2009
Sterling wrote:
<quoted text>
Then wouldn't you think that the church would encourage him to resign his position as CEO? Or is money more important than values?
No, money is more important than values. You know it, I know it and most of all, they know it. Why else wouldn't there be more who refute it? But good for you for showing it to them..
Pahoran

Auckland, New Zealand

#9 Oct 12, 2009
NoMo wrote:
<quoted text>
No, money is more important than values. You know it, I know it and most of all, they know it. Why else wouldn't there be more who refute it? But good for you for showing it to them..
What's to refute? Anonymous hearsay + ignorant opinion = nothing at all.

The old mantra that "money is more important than values" is, and always has been, false.

Perhaps that explains its appeal in certain quarters.

A number of years ago, when Bush was starting his program to give federal dosh to "faith-based" groups, the "money is more important than values" crowd were confidently predicting that the Church of Jesus Christ would be the first to stick its snout in the government trough. I predicted that it would have nothing to do with the initiative.

I was right. Thus, the "money is more important than values" accusation was proved to be false.

Which, as I said, may explain its appeal in certain quarters.

Regards,
Pahoran
Dave

Kansas City, MO

#10 Oct 12, 2009
Pahoran wrote:
<quoted text>
What's to refute? Anonymous hearsay + ignorant opinion = nothing at all.
The old mantra that "money is more important than values" is, and always has been, false.
Perhaps that explains its appeal in certain quarters.
A number of years ago, when Bush was starting his program to give federal dosh to "faith-based" groups, the "money is more important than values" crowd were confidently predicting that the Church of Jesus Christ would be the first to stick its snout in the government trough. I predicted that it would have nothing to do with the initiative.
I was right. Thus, the "money is more important than values" accusation was proved to be false.
Which, as I said, may explain its appeal in certain quarters.
Regards,
Pahoran
Pahoran, you've got to admit that even if it is heresay, that doesn't really matter. The single side of Marriott's is wrong.

Take out Sterling's friend and just look at Marriott. Obviously money and politics is more important.
Dave

Kansas City, MO

#11 Oct 12, 2009
[QUOTE who="Pahoran]
No-one in the Church has ever discussed my employment choices with me; I would be rather surprised if such choices were discussed with anyone, short of actually engaging in illegal or immoral acts.
Regards,
Pahoran[/QUOTE]

Really? So they don't ask you in your temple recommend interview if you are honest in your dealings with your fellow man?

Or do they ask you this?

Do you support, affiliate with, or agree with any group or individual whose teachings or practices are contrary to or oppose those accepted by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

Are you saying that you can live a double life? You have your business self, then your church self?

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#12 Oct 12, 2009
Pahoran wrote:
<quoted text>
What's to refute? Anonymous hearsay + ignorant opinion = nothing at all.
The old mantra that "money is more important than values" is, and always has been, false.
Perhaps that explains its appeal in certain quarters.
A number of years ago, when Bush was starting his program to give federal dosh to "faith-based" groups, the "money is more important than values" crowd were confidently predicting that the Church of Jesus Christ would be the first to stick its snout in the government trough. I predicted that it would have nothing to do with the initiative.
I was right. Thus, the "money is more important than values" accusation was proved to be false.
Which, as I said, may explain its appeal in certain quarters.
Regards,
Pahoran
You are skirting the issue with paragraphs....
Pahoran

Auckland, New Zealand

#13 Oct 13, 2009
Dave wrote:
<quoted text>
Pahoran, you've got to admit that even if it is heresay, that doesn't really matter. The single side of Marriott's is wrong.
Take out Sterling's friend and just look at Marriott. Obviously money and politics is more important.
Oh, "obviously." Since you tacitly admit that Sterling's accusation of a double standard is unsupported, I guess you have to shift the goal posts.
Dave wrote:
<quoted text>
Really? So they don't ask you in your temple recommend interview if you are honest in your dealings with your fellow man?
Or do they ask you this?
Do you support, affiliate with, or agree with any group or individual whose teachings or practices are contrary to or oppose those accepted by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?
Are you saying that you can live a double life? You have your business self, then your church self?
No. I am saying that it has been a very long time since Marriott was a family business.

Honesty is honesty. Is it your contention that it is dishonest to permit non-Mormons to buy drinks or access TV channels that we don't watch?

You are, probably intentionally, abusing the affiliation question. It refers to religious groups, not businesses or political parties.

Years ago, I worked for an airline. Airlines serve drinks on planes. Nobody ever told me it was illegal, immoral or fattening for me to work for that corporation. Is that your position?

Of course, I was a very small cog in a big machine, while Marriott is the CEO of his company; but he doesn't get to make policy, just carry it out. So, at what point does an employee become responsible for the decisions of those above him?

And what exactly is your real beef here? Is it just that this looks like a promising stick with which to beat the Church of Jesus Christ?

Or do you just like the idea of limiting the employment choices of Latter-day Saints?

It's clear to me that, if people like you had their way, Mormons really would be the new Jews.

And you're just fine with that, aren't you?

Well, I'm sorry to disappoint you; but we are going to continue to exercise our right to work, knowing that there are very few businesses anywhere whose corporate ethos is entirely compatible with LDS values.

Regards,
Pahoran
Eag11e

Surprise, AZ

#14 Jun 15, 2010
LOL....I live in Las Vegas and the story everyone that lives there knows is about the mormon cocktail waitress that lost her temple recommend because she served drinks in a casino.........Well, turns out one of the mormon general authorities owned a bank that yes you guessed it owned the very casino she worked in.......now I don't care who you are, that's funny. Get'r done
Joselo

Kenvil, NJ

#15 Nov 3, 2010
Hello would you stop bad mouthing the mormons? I bet that your friend was not paying the tithing that good brother Marriott is paying so the re you have it.....Holy Shniky this is actually worse than I thought...
just saying

Palmerston North, New Zealand

#16 May 23, 2011
i was the manager of a centre that was owned by a charitable trust, two of the trustees were a couple, one with gambling and adultery issues, another couple were both physically and emotionally abusive, one was known locally to be fraudulent and the centre itself abused public funding, but all this occurred at a level that i was not in control of, i gave my views as i'm sure brother marriott gives his but whether the trust/ board chooses to listen to our respective opinions is beyond our control. therefore we can not be personally judged for the actions of others. and as for all these x-members excommunication stories i can tell you that if i were ever excommunicated i probably wouldn't tell you the whole story as i'm sure they haven't also. it's easier to earn peoples sympathy if you tell half-truths. ie. i was excommunicated for working in a bar as opposed to, i was excommunicated for working in a bar where i prostituted also and was unwilling to stop doing so.
just saying

Palmerston North, New Zealand

#17 May 23, 2011
fyi, this is the site to see where the church in nz gets money from and where it's spent,just click on the last annual return link for more info. http://www.register.charities.govt.nz/Chariti...
ChileDog

Safford, AZ

#19 Feb 25, 2013
If the friend really was excommunicated for opening a bar that was wrong in my opinion. Where I live there are many Mormon owned businesses that sell liquor and are open on Sunday which I also feel is wrong.
Unfortunately the local church leaders can sometimes overstep their authority and ex someone for doing something others do who don't get exed. I am a faithful member and it is difficult to keep separated the doctrine and the people who do stupid things in the name of the doctrine. Unfortunately in any religion people get self righteous and do wrong things to others in and out of the religion. Since the beginning of Christianity it's members and churches have done stupid and horrible things.
your website is clueless

United States

#20 Jun 2, 2013
just saying wrote:
fyi, this is the site to see where the church in nz gets money from and where it's spent,just click on the last annual return link for more info. http://www.register.charities.govt.nz/Chariti...
just to let you know the website you use as a source is obsolete....that obviously means it was false... nice try but not good enough to deceive me or anyone else.
Nehi Barowenur

Dublin, Ireland

#21 Aug 22, 2016
Marriot Hotels cater to "gentiles" (non-Mormons) and there is nothing in the word of the wisdom forbidding Mormons to sell alcohol, tobacco, or caffeine to gentiles/non-Mormons (as long as they and their fellow Mormons do not partake). even the Prophet Joseph Smith owned and operated a bar in Nauvoo that sold liquor to non-Mormons. As long as they were sold to gentiles and not Mormons there was no problem. The same is true of Christians who may sell non-Christian merchandise, but do not actively participate in the promotion of the same among other Christians

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