codex sinaiticus - 1,600 yrs bible do...

““You must not lose faith ”

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#1528 Mar 3, 2013
23and Me ME-CFS forums methylation genetic results, advise and tools.
http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php...

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#1529 Mar 3, 2013
Gene expression regulation and the lactase gene ppt
https://docs.google.com/viewer...

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#1530 Mar 3, 2013
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/12/27/1...
How did humans develop lactose tolerance.
5000-10,000 y.a. both simultaneously

Evolution and the fossil record by John Pojeta, Jr. and Dale A. Springer
http://www.agiweb.org/news/evolution/datingfo...

http://www.actionbioscience.org/evolution/ben...
Accuracy of Fossils and Dating Methods

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/ja400471...
Rhodium-Catalyzed Intermolecular Oxidative Cross-Coupling of (Hetero)Arenes with Chalcogenophenes-Organic Letters (ACS Publications)
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ol400230y

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#1531 Mar 3, 2013
http://oasys2.confex.com/acs/234nm/techprogra...
developments (mind 2007, still relevant)

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#1532 Mar 3, 2013
http://www.wayoflife.org/database/westcotthor...
Still the basis for textual criticism.

What Hort and Westcott believed (bias okjv)
http://www.scionofzion.com/haw.htm

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#1533 Mar 3, 2013
http://skipmoen.com/tag/isaiah-406/
hebrew and greek word analysis

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#1534 Mar 3, 2013
https://docs.google.com/viewer...
Het denken, theoriën and theologiën van Westcott and Hort.
Dutch translation + statenbijbel citaten. Original website included. Carter.
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_non-int...

canaanite.org
http://www.canaanite.org/language/
QTN- diminish ->cotton
qTn hebrew- belittle

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#1535 Mar 3, 2013

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#1536 Mar 5, 2013
Switch from cuneiform to AaBaCa dary writing ~1600 BC/ Paleo hebrew pre 585 BC.

A lst of seals and ostracons, and again the quation of dates as used being of by centuries.
We only have a few historians who are only as good as their information e.g. Herodotus or Josephus or Manetho.

When it became apparent that the 18th dynasty was contemporaneous with Ahab of Israel, Velikovsky called for carbon dating of the items in King Tutankhamon's tomb.
These tests were done by Fred Mainwaring of the University of Pennsylvania. The tests were consistent with Velikovsky's date for the dynasty, but they were not consistent with the traditional chronology.

A tree can be a hundred years old or more before it is cut down and used as furniture, so a commensurate carbon date is to be expected, and was found, if Velikovsky's chronology is correct.

For the conventional chronology to be correct, the carbon date would imply that the tree used for furniture in the tomb did not sprout from its seed until centuries after the tomb was sealed a temporal impossibility. This means the traditional chronology is wrong.

People at the time could not bring themselves to question the traditional chronology, so they attributed the anomalous results to "contamination" and the British Museum refused to publish the results.

Now, with the discovery of this Jezebel seal, and the discovery of the statue of Queen Tiye found just beneath the 700 BCE layer, we have new grounds for insisting that the earlier tests be repeated, with the results published, and that new physical tests be performed as warranted.

These new finds now make it entirely plausible that a reduced chronology is correct, so contamination in the earlier tests can no longer be ruled out.

Further testing is necessary.

We have an opportunity here to recognize and advocate that it be done.

---
But we have lot's of anomalous finds, or let's rephrase that, conflicting dating.
Socalled older finds overlaying more recently dated or rather attributed finds.
http://www.specialtyinterest.net/seal_impress...

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#1537 Mar 8, 2013

““You must not lose faith ”

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#1538 Mar 8, 2013

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#1541 Mar 20, 2013
waiting for moses.
Song of songs (song comprised of many such songs?) an ancient form of the groom asking the father to marry the daughter.
G-d marrying the land, so El used to mount two cows, a form of intercession in kahanite and mesopotamian culture.
So not elohuym as god but the intermediaairy is enticed by making the golden cows/calfs.

chronology minus 600 years. Ugarit survived till the Assyrian onslaught of 854BC.
http://www.specialtyinterests.net/ugarit.html

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#1542 Mar 20, 2013
http://www.topix.com/forum/news/evolution/TFA...
same links as former page (working this time) on the dead sea level aragonite etc.

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#1543 Mar 21, 2013
Planck and the CMB 380,000 y.o. universe.
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Scien...

Back to the drawingboard.
Enlighten

Drummoyne, Australia

#1544 Sep 15, 2013
And behold said g-d I shall make things new to this world. Those that are meek shall inherit my Kindom, those that have no empathy so shall g-d have no empathy in judgement upon them.

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#1545 Oct 2, 2013
Revisiting Luvite G'ser.
One of the websites suggested it as ancient name for Israel.
Our source for neohittite/luvite is limited zo i have to find a different approach.
G'ser kind of souds like 'gerizim','chatzer' etc.
Smith part 2 of the 9 part dictionary of the kjv from the beginning of the 19th century, would link it with the meaning Heth/Hittite.
Later more specifics on that.

Food for thought:

It’s a safe bet you’ve not traveled to Hadhramaut, never mind heard of the location. Yet it does exist, though it may not feature high on the list of places to visit before you die. Hadhramaut is an ancient region, located somewhere in the hardscrabble deserts of eastern Yemen. Its name, according to many linguistic scholars, stems from the Arabic words for “death has come.” An old fable related to this name would suggest a locale with a morbid fascination with death.

I learned of all this, and a lot more, from a book I recently read. A book dedicated to tracing the origins of a well-known family that hails from this region: the Bin Ladens. A seemingly well-suited name for the native land of a person who has wreaked havoc and destruction, and caused an untold number of deaths.

Interestingly, the Torah mentions a locale with a similar name, which may very well have been the inspiration for the name of this region, or may even be the region’s original name.

In describing Noah’s offspring born after the flood, the Torah (Genesis 10:26) speaks of an individual named Chatzarmavet—or “Courtyard of Death.”

It would seem to be very poor judgment on the part of parents to name their child “Courtyard of Death.” Imagine the psychological effects on a child in a playground setting saddled with a name like this! What is even more curious about this narrative is that according to our tradition, the father of this child, Joktan, was a fine fellow, not to mention a humble and upstanding citizen!

Our sages address this question by teaching that Chatzarmavet was not the given name of Joktan’s son, but the name of the location where he settled. And it is a testament to the profound effect this person had upon his community that he earned the accolade of having an entire region named for him.

The citizens of Chatzarmavet were known for their inclination to forgo the instant gratification of transitory consumerism that plagued the milieu they lived in—favoring instead a life of enduring value and infinite existence. These were a good, simple folk, unfazed by credit crunches, toxic debt, or loss of equity and monetary value. These people lived a simple and austere lifestyle, eschewing a life of glitz and glamour in favor of a thrifty but happy existence.

They personified the teaching of our sages (Talmud, Shabbat 153a),“Repent one day before you die.” Since we never know when that day will come, we must always be repenting ... They always contemplated death—i.e., that since life is so fragile and temporary, it is foolish to waste time on acquiring, or worrying about, possessions that are of fleeting value. Instead they chose to focus on permanent and lasting ideals, those that will be of enduring value long after the soul departs the body.

Thus they were named “Courtyard of Death.” They eschewed the temporal “life” that so many pursue.

But from Hadhramaut comes one who chose to be defined by the literal meaning of the name of his ancestral home(...).

From Chatzarmavet, however, comes an idea of personal responsibility, of an ethos that ensures the perpetuation of a people focused on values that reject temporal materialism and the flavored soundbites of mass consumerism—in favor of a more difficult, yet ultimately more rewarding task of spiritual and moral growth, ensuring that we will overcome Hadhramaut with Chatzarmavet.

By Sholom Lew

Rabbi Sholom Lew is the director of Chabad of the West Valley in Glendale, Arizona.

More articles by Sholom Lew | RSS

Joktan get's us also to one of it's sons Adom.(spelling aside for now)

““You must not lose faith ”

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#1546 Oct 2, 2013
On with luvite/neo hittite G'ser.

It’s a safe bet you’ve not traveled to Hadhramaut, never mind heard of the location. Yet it does exist, though it may not feature high on the list of places to visit before you die. Hadhramaut is an ancient region, located somewhere in the hardscrabble deserts of eastern Yemen. Its name, according to many linguistic scholars, stems from the Arabic words for “death has come.” An old fable related to this name would suggest a locale with a morbid fascination with death.

I learned of all this, and a lot more, from a book I recently read. A book dedicated to tracing the origins of a well-known family that hails from this region: the Bin Ladens. A seemingly well-suited name for the native land of a person who has wreaked havoc and destruction, and caused an untold number of deaths.

Interestingly, the Torah mentions a locale with a similar name, which may very well have been the inspiration for the name of this region, or may even be the region’s original name.

In describing Noah’s offspring born after the flood, the Torah (Genesis 10:26) speaks of an individual named Chatzarmavet—or “Courtyard of Death.”

It would seem to be very poor judgment on the part of parents to name their child “Courtyard of Death.” Imagine the psychological effects on a child in a playground setting saddled with a name like this! What is even more curious about this narrative is that according to our tradition, the father of this child, Joktan, was a fine fellow, not to mention a humble and upstanding citizen!

Our sages address this question by teaching that Chatzarmavet was not the given name of Joktan’s son, but the name of the location where he settled. And it is a testament to the profound effect this person had upon his community that he earned the accolade of having an entire region named for him.

The citizens of Chatzarmavet were known for their inclination to forgo the instant gratification of transitory consumerism that plagued the milieu they lived in—favoring instead a life of enduring value and infinite existence. These were a good, simple folk, unfazed by credit crunches, toxic debt, or loss of equity and monetary value. These people lived a simple and austere lifestyle, eschewing a life of glitz and glamour in favor of a thrifty but happy existence.

They personified the teaching of our sages (Talmud, Shabbat 153a),“Repent one day before you die.” Since we never know when that day will come, we must always be repenting ... They always contemplated death—i.e., that since life is so fragile and temporary, it is foolish to waste time on acquiring, or worrying about, possessions that are of fleeting value. Instead they chose to focus on permanent and lasting ideals, those that will be of enduring value long after the soul departs the body.

Thus they were named “Courtyard of Death.” They eschewed the temporal “life” that so many pursue.

But from Hadhramaut comes one who chose to be defined by the literal meaning of the name of his ancestral home; hence a 9/11 atrocity is conceived and executed, resulting in the wanton murder of thousands of innocent people.

From Chatzarmavet, however, comes an idea of personal responsibility, of an ethos that ensures the perpetuation of a people focused on values that reject temporal materialism and the flavored soundbites of mass consumerism—in favor of a more difficult, yet ultimately more rewarding task of spiritual and moral growth, ensuring that we will overcome Hadhramaut with Chatzarmavet.

By Sholom Lew

Rabbi Sholom Lew is the director of Chabad of the West Valley in Glendale, Arizona.

More articles by Sholom Lew | RSS

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#1548 Oct 2, 2013
ABBREVIATIONS.
Aid. The Aldine edition of the Septuagint, 1518.
Alex. The Codex Alexandrinus (5th cent.), edited by Baber, 1816-28.
A. V. The authorized (common) English version of the Bible.
Comp. The Septuagint as printed in the Complutensian Polyglott, 1514-17, published
1522.
FA. The Codex Friderico-Augustanus (4th cent.), published by Tlschendorf in
1846.
Rom. The Roman edition of the Septuagint, 1587. The readings of the Septuagin
for which no authority is specified are also from this source.
Sin. The Codex Slnaiticus (4th cent), published by Tlschendorf In 1862. Th/S
and FA. are parts of the same manuscript.
Vat. The Codex Vaticanus 1209 (4th cent.), according to Mai's edition, published
by Vercellone in 1857. " Vat. H." denotes readings of the MS.(difierlng
from Mai), given in Holmes and Parsons's edition of the Septuagint, 1798-
1827. " Vat.^ " distinguishes the primary reading of the MS. from « Vat.*'*
or " 2. m.," the alteration of a later reviser.

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#1549 Oct 2, 2013
pg 889
GE'RA (W;^2 [grain, lilile ioei(/ht, Ges.]
:
rrjpd ; [in 1 Chr. viii. 5, Rom. Vat. Tepd • Gera]),
one of the " sons," i. e. desceidants, of Benjamin,
enumerated in Gen. xlvi. 21, as already living at
I he time of Jacob's migration into Egypt. He
was son of Bela (1 Chr. viii. 3).[Bela.] The
text of tliis last passage is very corrupt; and the
diflw.'ent Geras there named seem to reduce them-
Belvcss into one— the same as the son of Bela.
Gera, who is named Judg. iii. 15 as the ancestor
of Ehud, and in 2 Sam. xvi. 5 as the ancestor
of Shiniei who cursed David [Bkchku], is prob-
»My also the same person. Gera is not mentioned
in the list of Benjamite families in Num.
xxvi. 38-40 ; of which a very obvious explanation
is that at that time he was not the head of a separate
family, but was included among the Belaites
;
it being a matter of necessity that some of Bela's
sons should be so included, otherwise there could
be no family of Belaites at all. Dr. Kalisch has
uome long and rather perplexed observations on the
discrepancies in the lists in Gen. xlvi. and Num.
xxvi., and specially as regards the sons of Benjamin.
But the truth is that the two lists agree very well
as far as Benjamin is concerned. For the only discrepance
that remains, when the absence of Becher
and Gera from the list in Num. is thus explained,
is that for the two names "^HS and ti?Sn (Ehi
and Rosh) in Gen., we have the one name Dn"^nM
(Ahiram) in Num. If this last were written DM"),
as it might be, the two texts would be almost
identical, especially if written in the Samaritan
character, in which the sliin closely resembles the
mem. That Ahiram is right we are quite sure,
from the family of the Ahiramites, and from the
non-mention elsewhere of Rosh, which in fact is
not a proper name.[Rosh.] The conclusion
therefore seems certain that ti7Mm"^nS in Gen.
is a mere clerical error, and that there is perfect
agreement between the two lists. This view is
strengthened by the further fact that in the word
which follows Rosh, namely, INIuppim, the initial
m is an error for sh. It should be Shuppim, as in
Num. xxvi. 39; 1 Chr. vii. 12. The final in of
Ahh-am, and the initial sh of Shuppim, have thus
been transposed. To the remarks made under
Bechek should be added that the great destruction
of the Benjamites recorded in Judg. xx. may acoonnt
for the introduction of so many new names
b the later Benjamite lists of 1 Chr. vii. and viii.,
i£ which several seem to be women's names.
A. C. H.
GERAH.[Measures.]
GE'RAR (n;p2 [circle, district, Fiirst; abode,
residence, Sim., Ges.]: Tepapct [oi- Tcpapa; in 2
a The well where Isaac and Abimelech covenanted
ts distinguished by the LXX. from the Beer-sheba
whero Abraham did so. the former being called ^pe'ap
*pKQv, the latter ^pg'ap bpiciafjiov.
h The stopping wells is a device still resorted to. by
Jhe Bedouins, to make a country untenable by a neighcor
of whom they wish to be rid.
* lu his Phys. Geoi;r.(p. 123) Robinson says

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#1550 Oct 2, 2013
The greek and hebrew come out rather garbled, but the gist is uderstandable.
Chr., TeScip : Gerura ;] Joseph. Ant. 1. 12,§ 1 /
a very ancient city south of Gaza. It occurs chiert>
hi Genesis (x. 19, xx. 1, xxvi. 1, 6,[17, 20, 26])
also incidentally in 2 Chr. xiv. 13, 14. In GenesL
the people are spoken of as Philistines ; but theii
habits appear, in that early stage, more pastora,
than they subsequently were. Yet they are even
then warlike, since Abimelech was " a captain of the
host," who appears from his fixed title, " Phichol,"
like that of the king, " Abimelech," to be a permanent
officer (comp. Gen. xxi. 32, xxvi. 20, and
Ps. xxxiv., title). The local description, xx. 1,
"between Kadesh and Shur," is probably meant
to indicate the limits within which these pastoral
Philistines, whose chief seat was then Gerar, ranged,
although it would by no means follow that their territory
embraced all the interval between those cities.
It must have trenched on the " south" or "south
country " of later Palestine. From a comparison
of xxi. 32 with xxvi. 23, 2G,« I^r-sheba would
seem to be just on the verge of this territory, and
perhaps to be its limit towards the N. E. For its
southern boundary, though very uncertain, none is
more probable than the wadies ei-Arish (" River
ofF^gypt" [torrent,^R^]) and cI-Aiti; south
of which the neighboring " wilderness of Paran "
(xx. 1^, xxi. 22, 34) may be probably reckoned to
begui. Isaac was most probably born in Gerar.
The great crops which he subsequently raised attest
the fertility of the soil, which, lying in the maritime
plain, still contains some of the best ground in
Palestine (xxvi. 12). It is possible that the wells
mentioned by Robinson (i. 190) may represent
those digged by Abraham and reopened by Isaac
(xxvi. 18-22).'' Williams (Fluly City, i. 46) speaks
of a Joorf el-Gerar as now existing, three hours
S. S. E. of Gaza, and this may probably indicate
the northern limit of the territory, if not the site
of the town ; but the range of that territory need
not be so far narrowed as to make the Wady
liuhaibeh an impossible site, as Fiobinson thinks it
(see his map at end of vol. i. and i. 197), for
Rehoboth. There is also a Wady el-Jerur laid
down S. of the wadies above-named, and running
into one of them; but this is too far south (Robin
son, i. 189, note) to be accepted as a possible site
The valley of Gerar may be almost any important
wady within the limits indicated ; but if the abovementioned
situation for the wells be not rejected, it
would tend to designate the Wady et-'Ain. Robinson
(ii. 44) appears to prefer the Wady es-SherT<ih^
running to the sea south of Gaza.c Eusebius {de
Sit. if Nom. Loc. Ileb. s. v.) makes Gerar 25 miles
S. from Eleutheropolis, which would be about the
latitude of Beer-sheba ; but see Jerome, Lib. Qucest.
Heb. Gen. xxii. 3. Bered (xvi. 14) may perhaps
have lain in this territory. In 1 Chr. iv. 39, the
LXX. read Gerar,^1$ tV Tepapa, for Gedor; a
substitution which is not without some claims tc
support.[Beued; Beek-siieba; Gedou.]
H. H.
* GERAR, VALLEY OF.[Gerar.]
b'-anch of these valleys south and southeast of Gaza."
Van de Velde (ii. 183) heard of " a site called U7?i el-
Gerar, about 3 hours from Gaza, and about the samt
distance from the sea," though without any ruins to
indicate its antiquity. Thomson says {Land and Boot,
ii. 348) that Gerar has not yet been discovered, bu
can hardly fiiil to be brought to light, " jius t as sooc M
it is safe to travel in that region." H

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