Blacks Not Welcome in 'Most Tolerant' Arab Country.

Posted in the Islam Forum

george whyte

Market Rasen, UK

#1 Feb 19, 2013
Lebanon prides itself on its image as a melting pot on the Mediterranean: an ancient bastion of civilization boasting a diverse tapestry of cultures and creeds.
But scratch the surface, and it becomes apparent that not everyone fits into the country's cosmopolitan self-image.
Many migrants and mixed-race Lebanese, particularly those of Asian and African origin, say they encounter racism on a regular basis.
Nepalese woman Priya Subeydi told CNN she plans to leave the country soon, as she does not want her nine-month-old son growing up feeling like a second-class citizen.
"Every day we face racism," she said. "I just want to let him to grow in my own country."
Racism in Lebanon
Subeydi came to Lebanon as one of the more than 200,000 migrant domestic workers in the country, lured from mostly African and Asian countries by the promise of higher wages and steady employment in upper-middle class homes where household chores are viewed as beneath the family.
Today, Subeydi works in a migrant center in Beirut, providing assistance and support for domestic workers, some of whom, vulnerable in their new homes, face a grim reality of confinement, abuse, withheld payments and discriminatory treatment.
I never felt Lebanese to be honest. They assume that you are a prostitute, you are a maid, you are someone low class
Renee Abisaad is the daughter of a Lebanese mother and Nigerian father
Lebanon's treatment of migrant domestic workers has been thrust into the international spotlight in recent years.
In 2009 the country witnessed a spate of suicides among foreign maids, and last year a 33-year-old Ethiopian woman killed herself shortly after being filmed being beaten by a Lebanese man on a Beirut street.
The U.N. special rapporteur on slavery urged the Lebanese government to carry out a full investigation into the death. Ethiopia had banned citizens from traveling to Lebanon as domestic workers because of concerns over their lack of legal protection, although the ban was widely circumvented.
Read more: Can Iraq's geeks save the country?
But it's not only domestic workers who face racist treatment. Renee Abisaad is the daughter of a Lebanese mother and Nigerian father, who moved to the country when she was 11.
The engineering student -- a subject of a photo exhibition of mixed-race Lebanese intended to challenge social attitudes about race -- said that dealing with ethnic slurs had become the norm, and she planned to leave the country once she finished her studies.
She said she felt she was not accepted and looked down on because of her ethnicity.
"I never felt Lebanese to be honest," she told CNN. "They assume that you are a prostitute, you are a maid, you are someone low class."
It's a problem that is grounded in each in the way that we have been brought up, the way that we are not taught anything about accepting differences
Anti Racism Movement general coordinator, Farah Salka
The unequal treatment meted out to people of other ethnic backgrounds has prompted a group of activists in Lebanon, in collaboration with migrant community leaders, to form the Anti Racism Movement (ARM), committed to documenting, exposing and challenging racist behaviour and attitudes in the country.
In a recent campaign, the group conducted undercover stings at the country's beach resorts, where it found an Ethiopian women was turned away from going swimming and falsely told a "members only" policy was in place.
george whyte

Market Rasen, UK

#2 Feb 19, 2013
The club's actions contravened a decree issued by the Ministry of Tourism last summer barring resorts from discriminating on the basis of race, nationality or disability.
Lebanon's Minister of Tourism, Fadi Abboud, said the stance on racism made sense for both moral and practical reasons.
"If people think that we are a racial country, I think we can kiss tourism goodbye, so for me this is very serious, and it can only happen once," he said. "We let them know if it happens (another) time, we close them for one week -- if it happens again, we close them for good."
ARM's general coordinator, Farah Salka, said such measures against blatant discrimination were welcome and necessary. But truly tackling racism would require a more profound shift -- for individuals to re-examine and dismiss deeply ingrained personal prejudices.
"It's a problem that is grounded in each in the way that we have been brought up, the way that we are not taught anything about accepting differences," she said. "You can go to school for 15 years, go to college, become a doctor, but you're never ever taught the basics of how to be with other human beings in this country."
Palicide

Sulaymaniyah, Iraq

#3 Feb 19, 2013
They are welcome in the USA.
FcukTheNMEz

King Of Prussia, PA

#4 Feb 19, 2013
george whyte wrote:
Lebanon prides itself on its image as a melting pot on the Mediterranean: an ancient bastion of civilization boasting a diverse tapestry of cultures and creeds.
But scratch the surface, and it becomes apparent that not everyone fits into the country's cosmopolitan self-image.
Many migrants and mixed-race Lebanese, particularly those of Asian and African origin, say they encounter racism on a regular basis.
Nepalese woman Priya Subeydi told CNN she plans to leave the country soon, as she does not want her nine-month-old son growing up feeling like a second-class citizen.
"Every day we face racism," she said. "I just want to let him to grow in my own country."
Racism in Lebanon
Subeydi came to Lebanon as one of the more than 200,000 migrant domestic workers in the country, lured from mostly African and Asian countries by the promise of higher wages and steady employment in upper-middle class homes where household chores are viewed as beneath the family.
Today, Subeydi works in a migrant center in Beirut, providing assistance and support for domestic workers, some of whom, vulnerable in their new homes, face a grim reality of confinement, abuse, withheld payments and discriminatory treatment.
I never felt Lebanese to be honest. They assume that you are a prostitute, you are a maid, you are someone low class
Renee Abisaad is the daughter of a Lebanese mother and Nigerian father
Lebanon's treatment of migrant domestic workers has been thrust into the international spotlight in recent years.
In 2009 the country witnessed a spate of suicides among foreign maids, and last year a 33-year-old Ethiopian woman killed herself shortly after being filmed being beaten by a Lebanese man on a Beirut street.
The U.N. special rapporteur on slavery urged the Lebanese government to carry out a full investigation into the death. Ethiopia had banned citizens from traveling to Lebanon as domestic workers because of concerns over their lack of legal protection, although the ban was widely circumvented.
Read more: Can Iraq's geeks save the country?
But it's not only domestic workers who face racist treatment. Renee Abisaad is the daughter of a Lebanese mother and Nigerian father, who moved to the country when she was 11.
The engineering student -- a subject of a photo exhibition of mixed-race Lebanese intended to challenge social attitudes about race -- said that dealing with ethnic slurs had become the norm, and she planned to leave the country once she finished her studies.
She said she felt she was not accepted and looked down on because of her ethnicity.
"I never felt Lebanese to be honest," she told CNN. "They assume that you are a prostitute, you are a maid, you are someone low class."
It's a problem that is grounded in each in the way that we have been brought up, the way that we are not taught anything about accepting differences
Anti Racism Movement general coordinator, Farah Salka
The unequal treatment meted out to people of other ethnic backgrounds has prompted a group of activists in Lebanon, in collaboration with migrant community leaders, to form the Anti Racism Movement (ARM), committed to documenting, exposing and challenging racist behavior and attitudes in the country.
In a recent campaign, the group conducted undercover stings at the country's beach resorts, where it found an Ethiopian women was turned away from going swimming and falsely told a "members only" policy was in place.
Which is why Alla is using the Azkanazi Jews to destroy racist Arabs. God is not happy with Arabs for they have strayed from the Qur'an and Sunnah by practicing racism. One by one racist Arab nations shall be destroyed. Period.
FcukTheNMEz

Dallas, TX

#5 Feb 19, 2013
Racism is haram
FcukTheNMEz

Camp Verde, AZ

#6 Feb 19, 2013
george whyte wrote:
Lebanon prides itself on its image as a melting pot on the Mediterranean: an ancient bastion of civilization boasting a diverse tapestry of cultures and creeds.
But scratch the surface, and it becomes apparent that not everyone fits into the country's cosmopolitan self-image.
Many migrants and mixed-race Lebanese, particularly those of Asian and African origin, say they encounter racism on a regular basis.
Nepalese woman Priya Subeydi told CNN she plans to leave the country soon, as she does not want her nine-month-old son growing up feeling like a second-class citizen.
"Every day we face racism," she said. "I just want to let him to grow in my own country."
Racism in Lebanon
Subeydi came to Lebanon as one of the more than 200,000 migrant domestic workers in the country, lured from mostly African and Asian countries by the promise of higher wages and steady employment in upper-middle class homes where household chores are viewed as beneath the family.
Today, Subeydi works in a migrant center in Beirut, providing assistance and support for domestic workers, some of whom, vulnerable in their new homes, face a grim reality of confinement, abuse, withheld payments and discriminatory treatment.
I never felt Lebanese to be honest. They assume that you are a prostitute, you are a maid, you are someone low class
Renee Abisaad is the daughter of a Lebanese mother and Nigerian father
Lebanon's treatment of migrant domestic workers has been thrust into the international spotlight in recent years.
In 2009 the country witnessed a spate of suicides among foreign maids, and last year a 33-year-old Ethiopian woman killed herself shortly after being filmed being beaten by a Lebanese man on a Beirut street.
The U.N. special rapporteur on slavery urged the Lebanese government to carry out a full investigation into the death. Ethiopia had banned citizens from traveling to Lebanon as domestic workers because of concerns over their lack of legal protection, although the ban was widely circumvented.
Read more: Can Iraq's geeks save the country?
But it's not only domestic workers who face racist treatment. Renee Abisaad is the daughter of a Lebanese mother and Nigerian father, who moved to the country when she was 11.
The engineering student -- a subject of a photo exhibition of mixed-race Lebanese intended to challenge social attitudes about race -- said that dealing with ethnic slurs had become the norm, and she planned to leave the country once she finished her studies.
She said she felt she was not accepted and looked down on because of her ethnicity.
"I never felt Lebanese to be honest," she told CNN. "They assume that you are a prostitute, you are a maid, you are someone low class."
It's a problem that is grounded in each in the way that we have been brought up, the way that we are not taught anything about accepting differences
Anti Racism Movement general coordinator, Farah Salka
The unequal treatment meted out to people of other ethnic backgrounds has prompted a group of activists in Lebanon, in collaboration with migrant community leaders, to form the Anti Racism Movement (ARM), committed to documenting, exposing and challenging racist behaviour and attitudes in the country.
In a recent campaign, the group conducted undercover stings at the country's beach resorts, where it found an Ethiopian women was turned away from going swimming and falsely told a "members only" policy was in place.
This is why GOD is destroying the Arabs 1 by 1. They have made him angry by practicing Racism. Therefore God is using Jews to destroy Arab lands which were stolen from blacks.
Frank

Aurora, Canada

#7 Feb 19, 2013
FcukTheNMEz wrote:
Racism is haram
"Believers- do not be friends with Jews and Christians"-is it not racism in it's vulgar form?
george whyte

Market Rasen, UK

#8 Feb 21, 2013
Places like Mecca which is the holiest city in the Muslim world hosts more than 80,000 blacks of African origin who were mainly brought to the Arabian Peninsula by the slave traders. Other cities like Riyadh , Jubail , Jeddha and Jizan have also huge numbers of black slaves from Africa dispersed throughout the Arabian house holds.
Till this date blacks are owned in places like Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, mainly by the Saudi Royal Family.
The current estimated number of the Saudi Royal family is around 10,000 and almost all of these princes or princesses own one or more slaves in their palaces.
These captives have for a long time known nothing but serving their Arab masters and seem to have accepted their current status because of the consequences of any uprising or demand for their freedom.Hilatul Al Abiid (or the slave quarters) is a huge district in Riyadh which was characterised by the sale of slaves throughout the Arabian Peninsula during the 19th century slave trade .
The main ports of arrival for these slaves from Africa were Jubail where you can still see the remnants of the slave trade and Jeddah in the Red sea.Again till this date Saudi Arabian government turns a blind eye to the plight of these Africans and therefore abuse and maltreatment of these people has become common as well as rampant. An example of how these Africans are treated is that those blacks who work in the Holy Haram are often castrated to eliminate any sexual desire and to make them devoted to the work in the Holy mosque.
Another example of castration is also among those who are owned by the Royal Family. Slaves who work in the Royal palaces are mainly castrated in order to prevent their sexual contact with the Arab women who live in / or within the vicinity of the palaces.Saudi Arabia is a wealthy nation and often avoids any action by the international community against its human rights abuses. But no one knows what will happen when the oil runs out.

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