Muslims don't want Sharia Law, Muslim...

Muslims don't want Sharia Law, Muslims want democracy like the western countries

Posted in the Islam Forum

Seriously

Wolverhampton, UK

#1 Sep 29, 2013
Muslims don't want Sharia Law, Muslims want democracy like the western countries.
Onelawforall

London, UK

#2 Sep 30, 2013
No devout muslim wants democracy. A devout muslim believes the Quran is the word of god and would want sharia law.
If a muslim wants democracy they cannot be a devout muslim. As islam does not separate the state from the religion. Islam is a political organisation.

Since: Sep 09

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#3 Sep 30, 2013
Sharia law is units lambic....Sharia law is based on Tribal Patrichal customs not the Koran...a REAL true Muslim...not Al Queda , Hamas , Al Shabab....but a real Muslim ...would want DEMOCRACY.....but that terrifies Muslims like the illiterate bastards in Pakistan and followers of the Muslim brotherhood and Taliban because they would not be able to abuse women and rape little girls anymore, and children would be able to go to schools and learn....education and Democracy is the enemy of people like the Taliban.

Since: Sep 09

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#4 Sep 30, 2013
Damn Ipad.......meant to say...sharia law is un Islamic

Since: Sep 09

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#5 Sep 30, 2013
Development of the Sharia

Before Islam, the nomadic tribes inhabiting the Arabian peninsula worshiped idols. These tribes frequently fought with one another. Each tribe had its own customs governing marriage, hospitality, and revenge. Crimes against persons were answered with personal retribution or were sometimes resolved by an arbitrator. Muhammad introduced a new religion into this chaotic Arab world. Islam affirmed only one true God. It demanded that believers obey God's will and laws.

The Koran sets down basic standards of human conduct, but does not provide a detailed law code. Only a few verses deal with legal matters. During his lifetime, Muhammad helped clarify the law by interpreting provisions in the Koran and acting as a judge in legal cases. Thus, Islamic law, the Sharia, became an integral part of the Muslim religion.

Following Muhammad's death in A.D. 632, companions of Muhammad ruled Arabia for about 30 years. These political-religious rulers, called caliphs, continued to develop Islamic law with their own pronouncements and decisions. The first caliphs also conquered territories outside Arabia including Iraq, Syria, Palestine, Persia, and Egypt. As a result, elements of Jewish, Greek, Roman, Persian, and Christian church law also influenced the development of the Sharia.

Islamic law grew along with the expanding Muslim Empire. The Umayyad dynasty caliphs, who took control of the empire in 661, extended Islam into India, Northwest Africa, and Spain. The Umayyads appointed Islamic judges, kadis, to decide cases involving Muslims.(Non-Muslims kept their own legal system.) Knowledgeable about the Koran and the teachings of Muhammad, kadis decided cases in all areas of the law.

Following a period of revolts and civil war, the Umayyads were overthrown in 750 and replaced by the Abbasid dynasty. During the 500-year rule of the Abbasids, the Sharia reached its full development.

Under their absolute rule, the Abbasids transferred substantial areas of criminal law from the kadis to the government. The kadis continued to handle cases involving religious, family, property, and commercial law.

The Abbasids encouraged legal scholars to debate the Sharia vigorously. One group held that only the divinely inspired Koran and teachings of the Prophet Muhammad should make up the Sharia. A rival group, however, argued that the Sharia should also include the reasoned opinions of qualified legal scholars. Different legal systems began to develop in different provinces.

In an attempt to reconcile the rival groups, a brilliant legal scholar named Shafii systematized and developed what were called the "roots of the law." Shafii argued that in solving a legal question, the kadi or government judge should first consult the Koran. If the answer were not clear there, the judge should refer to the authentic sayings and decisions of Muhammad. If the answer continued to elude the judge, he should then look to the consensus of Muslim legal scholars on the matter. Still failing to find a solution, the judge could form his own answer by analogy from "the precedent nearest in resemblance and most appropriate" to the case at hand.

Shafii provoked controversy. He constantly criticized what he called "people of reason" and "people of tradition." While speaking in Egypt in 820, he was physically attacked by enraged opponents and died a few days later. Nevertheless, Shafii's approach was later widely adopted throughout the Islamic world.

By around the year 900, the classic Sharia had taken shape. Islamic specialists in the law assembled handbooks for judges to use in making their decisions.

The classic Sharia was not a code of laws, but a body of religious and legal scholarship that continued to develop for the next 1,000 years.
So you see, sharia was invented by men that had an agenda.....

Since: Sep 09

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#6 Sep 30, 2013
Development of the Sharia

Before Islam, the nomadic tribes inhabiting the Arabian peninsula worshiped idols. These tribes frequently fought with one another. Each tribe had its own customs governing marriage, hospitality, and revenge. Crimes against persons were answered with personal retribution or were sometimes resolved by an arbitrator. Muhammad introduced a new religion into this chaotic Arab world. Islam affirmed only one true God. It demanded that believers obey God's will and laws.

The Koran sets down basic standards of human conduct, but does not provide a detailed law code. Only a few verses deal with legal matters. During his lifetime, Muhammad helped clarify the law by interpreting provisions in the Koran and acting as a judge in legal cases. Thus, Islamic law, the Sharia, became an integral part of the Muslim religion.

Following Muhammad's death in A.D. 632, companions of Muhammad ruled Arabia for about 30 years. These political-religious rulers, called caliphs, continued to develop Islamic law with their own pronouncements and decisions. The first caliphs also conquered territories outside Arabia including Iraq, Syria, Palestine, Persia, and Egypt. As a result, elements of Jewish, Greek, Roman, Persian, and Christian church law also influenced the development of the Sharia.

Islamic law grew along with the expanding Muslim Empire. The Umayyad dynasty caliphs, who took control of the empire in 661, extended Islam into India, Northwest Africa, and Spain. The Umayyads appointed Islamic judges, kadis, to decide cases involving Muslims.(Non-Muslims kept their own legal system.) Knowledgeable about the Koran and the teachings of Muhammad, kadis decided cases in all areas of the law.

Following a period of revolts and civil war, the Umayyads were overthrown in 750 and replaced by the Abbasid dynasty. During the 500-year rule of the Abbasids, the Sharia reached its full development.

Under their absolute rule, the Abbasids transferred substantial areas of criminal law from the kadis to the government. The kadis continued to handle cases involving religious, family, property, and commercial law.

The Abbasids encouraged legal scholars to debate the Sharia vigorously. One group held that only the divinely inspired Koran and teachings of the Prophet Muhammad should make up the Sharia. A rival group, however, argued that the Sharia should also include the reasoned opinions of qualified legal scholars. Different legal systems began to develop in different provinces.

In an attempt to reconcile the rival groups, a brilliant legal scholar named Shafii systematized and developed what were called the "roots of the law." Shafii argued that in solving a legal question, the kadi or government judge should first consult the Koran. If the answer were not clear there, the judge should refer to the authentic sayings and decisions of Muhammad. If the answer continued to elude the judge, he should then look to the consensus of Muslim legal scholars on the matter. Still failing to find a solution, the judge could form his own answer by analogy from "the precedent nearest in resemblance and most appropriate" to the case at hand.

Shafii provoked controversy. He constantly criticized what he called "people of reason" and "people of tradition." While speaking in Egypt in 820, he was physically attacked by enraged opponents and died a few days later. Nevertheless, Shafii's approach was later widely adopted throughout the Islamic world.

By around the year 900, the classic Sharia had taken shape. Islamic specialists in the law assembled handbooks for judges to use in making their decisions.

The classic Sharia was not a code of laws, but a body of religious and legal scholarship that continued to develop for the next 1,000 years.
So you see, Sharia was written not by God but by men with a cultural agenda.
Onelawforall

London, UK

#7 Sep 30, 2013
For those unaware of what Sharia Law is here is a definition from Wikipedia.

Sharia is the moral code and religious law of Islam. Sharia deals with many topics addressed by secular law, including crime, politics, and economics, as well as personal matters such as sexual intercourse, hygiene, diet, prayer, and fasting. Though interpretations of sharia vary between cultures, in its strictest definition it is considered the infallible law of God—as opposed to the human interpretation of the laws.

The infallible law of god. Therefore a devout muslim would follow the infallible word of his god or he is not a devout muslim.
Islam and democracy are incompatible.

Since: Sep 09

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#8 Sep 30, 2013
Onelawforall wrote:
For those unaware of what Sharia Law is here is a definition from Wikipedia.
Sharia is the moral code and religious law of Islam. Sharia deals with many topics addressed by secular law, including crime, politics, and economics, as well as personal matters such as sexual intercourse, hygiene, diet, prayer, and fasting. Though interpretations of sharia vary between cultures, in its strictest definition it is considered the infallible law of God—as opposed to the human interpretation of the laws.
The infallible law of god. Therefore a devout muslim would follow the infallible word of his god or he is not a devout muslim.
Islam and democracy are incompatible.
But as you can see in my posts above Sharia is NOT the law of God...but rather laws made by men based on their own interpretation of the Koran and their own cultural lives....it is a man made law that was made by men with an agenda to control people. NOT by any GOD
Onelawforall

London, UK

#9 Oct 1, 2013
Mi_nina wrote:
<quoted text>
But as you can see in my posts above Sharia is NOT the law of God...but rather laws made by men based on their own interpretation of the Koran and their own cultural lives....it is a man made law that was made by men with an agenda to control people. NOT by any GOD
The Quran is supposed to be the literal word of Allah. All devout muslims believe this to be so. Therefore it follows that muslims believe in chopping off the hands of thieves, flogging/stoning adulterers, killing pagans and opposing democracy. You cannot believe in the literal word of god and be democratic. Most Islamic schools agree on this. If you don't then you cannot believe the Quran to be the word of god and therefore are not a muslim.

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