arab women and their sexual mutilation

arab women and their sexual mutilation

Posted in the Islam Forum

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Rick

Miami Beach, FL

#1 Nov 24, 2006
As soon as you become an Islamic woman or girl they take you to the local barber shop and they proceed to:
1.- the barber cuts your labia menora
2.- cuts the labia majora
3.- cut all your clitoris
After this the sex of the arab woman if a horrible open hole in which bugs and disease can enter.

This is a custom in all arab and Islamic countries and the woman will not be allowed even to cook if she is not operated. Once she has the operation she is accepted by the muslim community.
This horrible operation is also done in Muslim Detroit Michigan and other muslim enclaves in the US too.
Rick

Miami Beach, FL

#2 Nov 24, 2006
Rick wrote:
As soon as you become an Islamic woman or girl they take you to the local barber shop and they proceed to:
1.- the barber cuts your labia menora
2.- cuts the labia majora
3.- cut all your clitoris
After this the sex of the arab woman if a horrible open hole in which bugs and disease can enter.
This is a custom in all arab and Islamic countries and the woman will not be allowed even to cook if she is not operated. Once she has the operation she is accepted by the muslim community.
This horrible operation is also done in Muslim Detroit Michigan and other muslim enclaves in the US too.
Attention Muslims, is this true or not?
sham uk

UK

#3 Nov 24, 2006
Rick wrote:
As soon as you become an Islamic woman or girl they take you to the local barber shop and they proceed to:
1.- the barber cuts your labia menora
2.- cuts the labia majora
3.- cut all your clitoris
After this the sex of the arab woman if a horrible open hole in which bugs and disease can enter.
This is a custom in all arab and Islamic countries and the woman will not be allowed even to cook if she is not operated. Once she has the operation she is accepted by the muslim community.
This horrible operation is also done in Muslim Detroit Michigan and other muslim enclaves in the US too.
must be happening in your dreams, moron
Rick

Miami Beach, FL

#5 Nov 25, 2006
All women must know what is expected of them once they become muslims.
Of course Islam will try to hide this fact and denigrate anyone that makes an issue of this horrible muslim custom.
mohamedonkey

UK

#6 Nov 25, 2006
sham uk wrote:
<quoted text>must be happening in your dreams, moron
and you deny this happens? why is there at present a conference of muslims to discuss this very matter? If it doesn't happen, why discuss it? what a cretinous returd you are.
sham uk

UK

#7 Nov 25, 2006
mohamedonkey wrote:
<quoted text>
and you deny this happens? why is there at present a conference of muslims to discuss this very matter? If it doesn't happen, why discuss it? what a cretinous returd you are.
YOU CAN SEND ANY ABSURD THING ON THE NET, LIKE SOME OF THE STUPID THINGS PEOPLE SEND ON THIS FORUM THAT DOESN'T MEAN ITS TRUE AND A FOOL LIKE YOU WOULD BELIEVE TOO
ONE MO-hammad TIME

Cape Coral, FL

#8 Nov 25, 2006
sham uk wrote:
<quoted text>YOU CAN SEND ANY ABSURD THING ON THE NET, LIKE SOME OF THE STUPID THINGS PEOPLE SEND ON THIS FORUM THAT DOESN'T MEAN ITS TRUE AND A FOOL LIKE YOU WOULD BELIEVE TOO
Battling the scourge of female genital mutilation in Egypt


© UNICEF Egypt
Awatef Ramadan addressing a public awareness session on FGM/C in Manfalout, upper Egypt.

Awatef Ramadan's first harrowing glimpse of the practice known as female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C) came at the age of six, when she was growing up in the southern Egyptian town of Manfalout.

“My eleven year old elder sister was to be circumcised and I was among the female relatives who witnessed the event. I heard my sister scream out with pain, and then we saw that she was bleeding heavily. My mother started yelling in panic and my sister was rushed to hospital. Her life was saved but only just.”

Those terrible memories were still vivid in Awatef's mind a few years later, when she was told that it was her turn to be circumcised.

“It was the school holidays – the traditional time for girls to be circumcised. The daya (village midwife) came to our home and I realized what was to happen."

Recalling her sister's ordeal, Awatef knew she could never submit to such a fate. As the daya tried to grab hold of her, Awatef kicked out, before fleeing from the house and running to the sanctuary of her aunt's home nearby.

In Upper Egypt, and indeed throughout the country, studies show that the vast majority of girls and women are circumcised. The practice – whose origins date back more than two thousand years -- is widely seen as a necessary step towards womanhood, and as a requirement for a girl to be accepted in marriage. Circumcision is thought to curb a girl's sexual desire, helping to keep her chaste before marriage, and faithful to her husband afterwards. Girls and women who are not circumcised suffer stigmatization. Awatef say she was more fortunate.

“Up till now I didn’t face any problem for not undergoing FGM/C, and it meant that in my sexual relations with my husband I have no problems."

With her passionate conviction against FGM/C, Awatef was an ideal candidate to join the FGM Abandonment Programme implemented by the Assiut Childhood and Development Association (ACDA) with the support of UNICEF. Indeed, even before the start of the programme -- which targets eight communities in the governorate of Assiut -- Awatef managed to convince her brothers and sisters not to circumcise her nieces.

The cornerstone of the of the ACDA programme are so-called “positive deviants”, using a strategy developed by another NGO, the Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA). "Positive deviants" are individuals like Awatef, who have strong personal convictions against FGM/C and are prepared to try and persuade others in their community that it is both unnecessary and harmful.

page 1 of 2
ONE MO-hammad TIME

Cape Coral, FL

#9 Nov 25, 2006
Since undergoing training with ACDA, Awatef holds discussions on the FGM/C issue with pupils at the secondary school where she teaches. She also visits private homes to meet family members and attempt to change their views on the practice. Such has been her success that some of her pupils produced a play entitled “No to FGM/C” which was shown before a large audience in Manfalout. The play tells the story of a girl who refuses to be circumcised and tries to convince her parents not to subject her to the ordeal.

Public awareness sessions are another means of battling the practice. Awatef and other campaigners – including Muslim and Christian leaders – use a mixture of passion and reason to persuade their audiences that an ancient practice must end.

"I appeal to future mothers not to subject their children to this operation which is an act of abuse," explains Awatef. "I tell people that if they really love their daughters they should take good care of them and see that they are well educated. This is something much more important to give a girl and her future husband than circumcising her.”

Awatef believes that with the taboo that once prevented open discussion of FGM/C well and truly broken, a change is starting to take place in communities like Manfalout.

“In the old days we used to hear about groups of 10 or 15 girls being taken to a home and being circumcised one after the other. Such things are rare nowadays."


Page 2 of 2
sham uk

UK

#10 Nov 25, 2006
ONE MO-hammad TIME wrote:
<quoted text>
Battling the scourge of female genital mutilation in Egypt
© UNICEF Egypt
Awatef Ramadan addressing a public awareness session on FGM/C in Manfalout, upper Egypt.
Awatef Ramadan's first harrowing glimpse of the practice known as female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C) came at the age of six, when she was growing up in the southern Egyptian town of Manfalout.
“My eleven year old elder sister was to be circumcised and I was among the female relatives who witnessed the event. I heard my sister scream out with pain, and then we saw that she was bleeding heavily. My mother started yelling in panic and my sister was rushed to hospital. Her life was saved but only just.”
Those terrible memories were still vivid in Awatef's mind a few years later, when she was told that it was her turn to be circumcised.
“It was the school holidays – the traditional time for girls to be circumcised. The daya (village midwife) came to our home and I realized what was to happen."
Recalling her sister's ordeal, Awatef knew she could never submit to such a fate. As the daya tried to grab hold of her, Awatef kicked out, before fleeing from the house and running to the sanctuary of her aunt's home nearby.
In Upper Egypt, and indeed throughout the country, studies show that the vast majority of girls and women are circumcised. The practice – whose origins date back more than two thousand years -- is widely seen as a necessary step towards womanhood, and as a requirement for a girl to be accepted in marriage. Circumcision is thought to curb a girl's sexual desire, helping to keep her chaste before marriage, and faithful to her husband afterwards. Girls and women who are not circumcised suffer stigmatization. Awatef say she was more fortunate.
“Up till now I didn’t face any problem for not undergoing FGM/C, and it meant that in my sexual relations with my husband I have no problems."
With her passionate conviction against FGM/C, Awatef was an ideal candidate to join the FGM Abandonment Programme implemented by the Assiut Childhood and Development Association (ACDA) with the support of UNICEF. Indeed, even before the start of the programme -- which targets eight communities in the governorate of Assiut -- Awatef managed to convince her brothers and sisters not to circumcise her nieces.
The cornerstone of the of the ACDA programme are so-called “positive deviants”, using a strategy developed by another NGO, the Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA). "Positive deviants" are individuals like Awatef, who have strong personal convictions against FGM/C and are prepared to try and persuade others in their community that it is both unnecessary and harmful.
page 1 of 2
if some one is practicing such things it doesnt mean the religion is at fault. no where in the quran or the hadith does it say anything about female mutilationso dont blame the religion blame the humans that are practicing such acts
LAUGHING PIG

UK

#11 Nov 25, 2006
sham uk wrote:
<quoted text>if some one is practicing such things it doesnt mean the religion is at fault. no where in the quran or the hadith does it say anything about female mutilationso dont blame the religion blame the humans that are practicing such acts
it is the religion, only muslims do it. This sort of thing has NEVER been done in the west, even 2 thousand years back. It is up to you muslims to put your house in order.
sham uk

UK

#12 Nov 25, 2006
LAUGHING PIG wrote:
<quoted text> it is the religion, only muslims do it. This sort of thing has NEVER been done in the west, even 2 thousand years back. It is up to you muslims to put your house in order.
there was a time when britain beheaded people and today gays get married in which religion does it say that????
Take that

Frenchville, PA

#13 Nov 25, 2006
And way back it was the "Indians", then the Communist, blacks, Cubans, Arabs, then it will be the Koreans, then it will be "them", then "them".......America s hate for themselfs and others is obvious.

They can't comtroll there own lifes, so w2hy not screw up others. Loser's.
fred

Pearl City, HI

#14 Nov 25, 2006
Take that wrote:
And way back it was the "Indians", then the Communist, blacks, Cubans, Arabs, then it will be the Koreans, then it will be "them", then "them".......America s hate for themselfs and others is obvious.
They can't comtroll there own lifes, so w2hy not screw up others. Loser's.
u are right about one, it was the communists now its the muslims. for the rest are ethnicities and not ideologies and such are stupid and useless in ur analogy.

opposing communism was important and opposing islam is important. both spread hatred and tyranny.
Take that

Frenchville, PA

#15 Nov 25, 2006
fred wrote:
<quoted text>
u are right about one, it was the communists now its the muslims. for the rest are ethnicities and not ideologies and such are stupid and useless in ur analogy.
opposing communism was important and opposing islam is important. both spread hatred and tyranny.

America is the global leader of hate and tyranny. Sadly you will only realise this when it is too late to correct it.
fred

Ewa Beach, HI

#16 Nov 25, 2006
Take that wrote:
<quoted text>
America is the global leader of hate and tyranny. Sadly you will only realise this when it is too late to correct it.
best leave the US now! quick! go! goto the superior islamic countries!

america has been the greatest force of good in the last 50 years.
Take that

Frenchville, PA

#17 Nov 26, 2006
fred wrote:
<quoted text>
best leave the US now! quick! go! goto the superior islamic countries!
america has been the greatest force of good in the last 50 years.


' Force of good". Only America sets ones house on fire then offers to "help" put it out.

' Force of good". Ask the aboriginals there in Hawaii about that, "howie".
fred

Ewa Beach, HI

#18 Nov 26, 2006
Take that wrote:
<quoted text>
' Force of good". Only America sets ones house on fire then offers to "help" put it out.
' Force of good". Ask the aboriginals there in Hawaii about that, "howie".
they aren't called aboriginals, and their standard of living is massively higher because of america. their access to health care, education level, economic opportunity. w/o america hawaii would look like haiti. hawaiians have one of the richest schools on the planet. kamehameha schools whose endowment is in the billions(I think 2-4). now they misuse it, but thats their own damn fault.

and if u want a contrast of what america can do, compared to what happens if america loses just look at our wars:

japan, germany, south korea were all american.

north korea, vietnam were not.

the 3 former are the top economies on the planet, industrial super powers, w/ high standards of living. the latter two are about as bad as it gets, horrid crapholes of tyranny.

so, looking objectively we can see the power of america.
LAUGHING PIG

India

#19 Nov 26, 2006
sham uk wrote:
<quoted text>there was a time when britain beheaded people and today gays get married in which religion does it say that????
none at all. our laws are made by parliament.we are a democracy. If you live here, why don't you know that? you call yourself British, and you didn't even know how our laws are made?
LAUGHING PIG

India

#20 Nov 26, 2006
Take that wrote:
<quoted text>
' Force of good". Only America sets ones house on fire then offers to "help" put it out.
' Force of good". Ask the aboriginals there in Hawaii about that, "howie".
why not go away from yje USA then? go to some Islamic turdhole.
sham uk

UK

#21 Nov 26, 2006
LAUGHING PIG wrote:
<quoted text> none at all. our laws are made by parliament.we are a democracy. If you live here, why don't you know that? you call yourself British, and you didn't even know how our laws are made?
yeah that parliament,that allows 24 hour drinking and which now is proposing to legalise hard drugs..... regardless of the impact it may have on society

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