Science vs. Religion
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Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#1 Aug 1, 2013
Which is the more important invention of humankind, science or religion?

Religious belief is unquestioning - you must suspend logic and reason, and put your "faith" in an unseen and unknowable being.

Science, on the other hand, asks us to thoroughly test our assumptions, to gather evidence and analyze the results. And then it demands that other people question our conclusions and try to prove us wrong. If they cannot, then we have the makings of a valid scientific theory or even a new law of science.

The scientific process has propelled advances in basic research and practical applications for everything from extending our lives to expanding our physical and mental horizons.

Are science and religion compatible? Around the third century B.C. Aristotle and other Greek philosophers put us on the right track, employing measurement to help us learn about the world. Aristotle believed that the gods existed, and in fact his scholastic view of the gods influenced Christian and Muslim philosophy. It was Muslim scholars who pioneered the basics of testing and observation, the foundations of the scientific method, more than 1,000 years ago.

Among the other theists who helped to refine the process were Roger Bacon, the Franciscan friar who fostered the use of inductive reasoning in the 1200s; Galileo, the pious Roman Catholic physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who put Bacon's ideas into practice in the late 1500s and early 1600s; and Rene Descartes, Francis Bacon and Isaac Newton, three Christians who built on the method shortly before and during the Enlightenment of the 1700s - to name a mere handful.

The point I'd like to emphasize here is that the men and women who advanced our scientific knowledge, though primarily believers, were unafraid to inquire. They could appreciate what they believed god or the gods had created while simultaneously wanting to learn how, and why, things happened.

The antagonism between science and religion is manifest in the orthodox, fundamentalist religious schools of thought. In those circles questioning is forbidden, and inquiry can lead to imprisonment, torture, and even execution.

While we in the United States decry the atrocities committed by fundamentalist Muslims and the treatment of women in countries where Muslim clerics have real political power, we're nearly blind to the fact that the same thing is taking place in the United States.

The ultra-conservative Christian fundamentalist wing of the Republican party has achieved considerable political power, and its stated goals are to overturn Roe v. Wade, to replace the teaching of evolution in our public schools with the teaching of creationism, the denial of full civil rights to gays, and to appoint the Judeo-Christian God as the supreme and final authority in American civil and criminal law.

I fully believe that fear is the motivating force, specifically the fear that science may ultimately disprove any of the basic beliefs of the Judeo-Christian theology.

What do YOU think?
little lamb

South Yarra, Australia

#4 Aug 1, 2013
Many scientists are Christians...it was their faith in Gods works that got them interested in examining things in the first place.

But the evolution religionists, just want us to take their theory on FAITH.

You have to make a distinction between men of Faith who investigate

and men of 'theories' who try their ideas to propagate.

“Vader2016!”

Since: Sep 10

The Deathstar

#5 Aug 1, 2013
HighlyEvolved wrote:
Which is the more important invention of humankind, science or religion?
Religious belief is unquestioning - you must suspend logic and reason, and put your "faith" in an unseen and unknowable being.
Science, on the other hand, asks us to thoroughly test our assumptions, to gather evidence and analyze the results. And then it demands that other people question our conclusions and try to prove us wrong. If they cannot, then we have the makings of a valid scientific theory or even a new law of science.
The scientific process has propelled advances in basic research and practical applications for everything from extending our lives to expanding our physical and mental horizons.
Are science and religion compatible? Around the third century B.C. Aristotle and other Greek philosophers put us on the right track, employing measurement to help us learn about the world. Aristotle believed that the gods existed, and in fact his scholastic view of the gods influenced Christian and Muslim philosophy. It was Muslim scholars who pioneered the basics of testing and observation, the foundations of the scientific method, more than 1,000 years ago.
Among the other theists who helped to refine the process were Roger Bacon, the Franciscan friar who fostered the use of inductive reasoning in the 1200s; Galileo, the pious Roman Catholic physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who put Bacon's ideas into practice in the late 1500s and early 1600s; and Rene Descartes, Francis Bacon and Isaac Newton, three Christians who built on the method shortly before and during the Enlightenment of the 1700s - to name a mere handful.
The point I'd like to emphasize here is that the men and women who advanced our scientific knowledge, though primarily believers, were unafraid to inquire. They could appreciate what they believed god or the gods had created while simultaneously wanting to learn how, and why, things happened.
The antagonism between science and religion is manifest in the orthodox, fundamentalist religious schools of thought. In those circles questioning is forbidden, and inquiry can lead to imprisonment, torture, and even execution.
While we in the United States decry the atrocities committed by fundamentalist Muslims and the treatment of women in countries where Muslim clerics have real political power, we're nearly blind to the fact that the same thing is taking place in the United States.
The ultra-conservative Christian fundamentalist wing of the Republican party has achieved considerable political power, and its stated goals are to overturn Roe v. Wade, to replace the teaching of evolution in our public schools with the teaching of creationism, the denial of full civil rights to gays, and to appoint the Judeo-Christian God as the supreme and final authority in American civil and criminal law.
I fully believe that fear is the motivating force, specifically the fear that science may ultimately disprove any of the basic beliefs of the Judeo-Christian theology.
What do YOU think?
LOL @ you on the thread name! Kudos on the post.

“Vader2016!”

Since: Sep 10

The Deathstar

#6 Aug 1, 2013
Hardie-Har-Har wrote:
Like 'Science', which couldn't dump 'Religion', and which had to carry it forward like

a useless back-hump, our Modernized Cerebellum still has to carry the primitive blobs
I literally spit milk out of my nose.

Jerk.

“Vader2016!”

Since: Sep 10

The Deathstar

#7 Aug 1, 2013
little lamb wrote:
Many scientists are Christians...it was their faith in Gods works that got them interested in examining things in the first place.
But the evolution religionists, just want us to take their theory on FAITH.
You have to make a distinction between men of Faith who investigate
and men of 'theories' who try their ideas to propagate.
Evolution is not a religion. It is no more a religion than gravity.

You need to go here...

http://www.talkorigins.org/

...before you make another post about evolution.

Maybe try finding out about science and how it works rather than snub your nose and look ignorant.

Learn about science from science not what your Sunday sermon says it means.

“No Allah: know peace”

Since: Jun 07

A sacred grove in Tujunga, CA

#8 Aug 1, 2013
Science and religion are non-overlapping schools of teaching. Science teaches us how the world operates (like the fact that we got here through evolution &c) while religions tell us what we are supposed to be doing while we are here (what constitutes "good morals" &c). To borrow from Stepeh J. Gould, science teaches us how to get to the Moon, religion teaches us how to get to Heaven.
little lamb

South Yarra, Australia

#9 Aug 1, 2013
10uhsee wrote:
<quoted text>
Evolution is not a religion. It is no more a religion than gravity.
You need to go here...
http://www.talkorigins.org/
...before you make another post about evolution.
Maybe try finding out about science and how it works rather than snub your nose and look ignorant.
Learn about science from science not what your Sunday sermon says it means.
Evolution is not science.

Evolution is a religion..you have to take it on BLIND FAITH

Because most of it is 'assumption'

Whereas science is knowledge based on observable fact.

People often confuse the religion of evolution with science ..but that is due to ignorance.

“Wear white at night.”

Since: Jun 09

Albuquerque

#10 Aug 1, 2013
little lamb wrote:
<quoted text>
Evolution is not science.
Evolution is a religion..you have to take it on BLIND FAITH
Because most of it is 'assumption'
Whereas science is knowledge based on observable fact.
People often confuse the religion of evolution with science ..but that is due to ignorance.
I assume the fact you don't know squat about science somewhat biases your opinion.

God bless you.

“God Loves Ilks!”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#12 Aug 1, 2013
Well, I figure God used a lot of science in His Creating, so they might be equal in a lot of ways.
:)
For all I know God might be science.

“Wear white at night.”

Since: Jun 09

Albuquerque

#13 Aug 1, 2013
Nettiebelle wrote:
Well, I figure God used a lot of science in His Creating, so they might be equal in a lot of ways.
:)
For all I know God might be science.
Catechism of the Catholic Church:

159)(excerpt) Since the same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself, nor can truth ever contradict truth. Consequently, methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things of faith derive from the same God.

----------

It seems God has not 'bestowed the light of reason' in equal measure.

God bless you.

“God Loves Ilks!”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#14 Aug 1, 2013
15th Dalai Lama wrote:
<quoted text>
Catechism of the Catholic Church:
159)(excerpt) Since the same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself, nor can truth ever contradict truth. Consequently, methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things of faith derive from the same God.
----------
It seems God has not 'bestowed the light of reason' in equal measure.
God bless you.
:)
It appears so.
Scnc1Rlgn0

Union City, TN

#16 Aug 2, 2013
little lamb wrote:
<quoted text>
Evolution is not science.
Evolution is a religion..you have to take it on BLIND FAITH
Because most of it is 'assumption'
Whereas science is knowledge based on observable fact.
People often confuse the religion of evolution with science ..but that is due to ignorance.
Evolution doesn't require "blind faith." There is overwhelming evidence supporting evolution. The details may not be agreed upon, but the fact that evolution is a very real and occurring event is.

Try taking the other pill next time and join us in reality.
Job

Santa Clara, CA

#17 Aug 2, 2013
HighlyEvolved wrote:
Which is the more important invention of humankind, science or religion?
Religious belief is unquestioning - you must suspend logic and reason, and put your "faith" in an unseen and unknowable being.
Science, on the other hand, asks us to thoroughly test our assumptions, to gather evidence and analyze the results. And then it demands that other people question our conclusions and try to prove us wrong. If they cannot, then we have the makings of a valid scientific theory or even a new law of science.
The scientific process has propelled advances in basic research and practical applications for everything from extending our lives to expanding our physical and mental horizons.
Are science and religion compatible? Around the third century B.C. Aristotle and other Greek philosophers put us on the right track, employing measurement to help us learn about the world. Aristotle believed that the gods existed, and in fact his scholastic view of the gods influenced Christian and Muslim philosophy. It was Muslim scholars who pioneered the basics of testing and observation, the foundations of the scientific method, more than 1,000 years ago.
Among the other theists who helped to refine the process were Roger Bacon, the Franciscan friar who fostered the use of inductive reasoning in the 1200s; Galileo, the pious Roman Catholic physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who put Bacon's ideas into practice in the late 1500s and early 1600s; and Rene Descartes, Francis Bacon and Isaac Newton, three Christians who built on the method shortly before and during the Enlightenment of the 1700s - to name a mere handful.
The point I'd like to emphasize here is that the men and women who advanced our scientific knowledge, though primarily believers, were unafraid to inquire. They could appreciate what they believed god or the gods had created while simultaneously wanting to learn how, and why, things happened.
There are some distinct similarities between what is going on today, and what went on during the time of Galileo. Back in the days of Galileo, there was a dominating system that controlled science which was the church. Today, the controlling system is evolution/evolutionists. Back then, the "heliocentric theory" was 'blasphemy'. Now,'Creationism' is the new "blasphemy". It's worded a bit different to (perhaps unconsciously) avoid any correlation 'with' religious control, but the same principle. Instead of words like "blasphemer", "heathen"; words like "anti-science" (the equivalent of suggesting a professed believer is anti-God due to doctrinal differences), "moron", "hillbilly", etc.
Job

Santa Clara, CA

#18 Aug 2, 2013
HighlyEvolved wrote:
1. The point I'd like to emphasize here is that the men and women who advanced our scientific knowledge, though primarily believers, were unafraid to inquire. They could appreciate what they believed god or the gods had created while simultaneously wanting to learn how, and why, things happened.
The antagonism between science and religion is manifest in the orthodox, fundamentalist religious schools of thought. In those circles questioning is forbidden, and inquiry can lead to imprisonment, torture, and even execution.

2. While we in the United States decry the atrocities committed by fundamentalist Muslims and the treatment of women in countries where Muslim clerics have real political power, we're nearly blind to the fact that the same thing is taking place in the United States.

3. The ultra-conservative Christian fundamentalist wing of the Republican party has achieved considerable political power, and its stated goals are to overturn Roe v. Wade, to replace the teaching of evolution in our public schools with the teaching of creationism, the denial of full civil rights to gays, and to appoint the Judeo-Christian God as the supreme and final authority in American civil and criminal law.

4. I fully believe that fear is the motivating force, specifically the fear that science may ultimately disprove any of the basic beliefs of the Judeo-Christian theology.
What do YOU think?
1. Can you provide an example?

2. Like what? What 'atrocities' are fundamentalist Christians committing? How are 'we' abusing women?

3. What would be the difference between the ultra-conservative Christian fundamentalist wing of the Republican party gaining power, and the ultra-leftist wing of the Democratic party gaining power? Is it "gaining power" in general (any one group gaining power) you have a problem with? Or only specific groups gaining power?

4. First off, it's not 'evolution' that's being suppressed. It's Creationism that is being suppressed. Secondly, while there are certainly those who wish to see evolution replaced with creationism in the classroom, there are Creationists who do 'not' want it replaced/removed. Basically, the scientists 'themselves' who embrace Creationism. They would rather 'both' be presented so that all can decide for themselves which one to embrace. They are 'confident' enough with their views to challenge evolutionism 'openly'.

Could there be fear among those within the evolution camp?

“No Allah: know peace”

Since: Jun 07

A sacred grove in Tujunga, CA

#19 Aug 2, 2013
Job wrote:
<quoted text>
There are some distinct similarities between what is going on today, and what went on during the time of Galileo. Back in the days of Galileo, there was a dominating system that controlled science which was the church. Today, the controlling system is evolution/evolutionists. Back then, the "heliocentric theory" was 'blasphemy'. Now,'Creationism' is the new "blasphemy". It's worded a bit different to (perhaps unconsciously) avoid any correlation 'with' religious control, but the same principle. Instead of words like "blasphemer", "heathen"; words like "anti-science" (the equivalent of suggesting a professed believer is anti-God due to doctrinal differences), "moron", "hillbilly", etc.
Oh, there are other differences as well. Like the fact that the evolutionists are accurate when they discribe the creotards as profoundly ignorant of the nature of reality.

The simple fact is that the scientific evidence is undeniable. In a century and a half, there has never been ANY valid evidence denying evolution while EVERY piece of evidence so far discovered has supported evolution
susanblange

Norfolk, VA

#20 Aug 2, 2013
Science and religion are perfectly compatible. God conforms to the rules of mathematics and science and these rules proclaim the glory of God. The prophets understood science. Daniel 1:4.
Big Al

Hibbing, MN

#21 Aug 2, 2013
Job wrote:
<quoted text>
There are some distinct similarities between what is going on today, and what went on during the time of Galileo. Back in the days of Galileo, there was a dominating system that controlled science which was the church. Today, the controlling system is evolution/evolutionists. Back then, the "heliocentric theory" was 'blasphemy'. Now,'Creationism' is the new "blasphemy". It's worded a bit different to (perhaps unconsciously) avoid any correlation 'with' religious control, but the same principle. Instead of words like "blasphemer", "heathen"; words like "anti-science" (the equivalent of suggesting a professed believer is anti-God due to doctrinal differences), "moron", "hillbilly", etc.
In the day of Galileo geocentrism was based on faith and heliocentrism was based on real world evidence, just as in this day and age Creationism is based on faith and Evolution theory is based on real world evidence. Science is about real world evidence and faith is about accepting things as true without real world evidence.

dollarsbill

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#26 Aug 2, 2013
10uhsee wrote:
Evolution is not a religion.
Evolution like Atheism faith.

dollarsbill

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#27 Aug 2, 2013
15th Dalai Lama wrote:
<quoted text>
I assume the fact you don't know squat about science somewhat biases your opinion.
God bless you.
Should we assume you are 'biased' because you're a Bible hater?

“God Loves Ilks!”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#28 Aug 2, 2013
dollarsbill wrote:
<quoted text>
Evolution like Atheism faith.
Evolution is a part of science.

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