R.E. in U.K. Schools
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“so tell me......”

Since: Aug 08

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#1 Oct 6, 2013
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-24399813
More than half of England's schools are failing pupils on religious education, the schools watchdog Ofsted has said.

Its report accuses schools and the government of failing to focus effectively on the subject.

It adds that six in 10 schools are not "realising the subject's full potential" in an increasingly globalised and multicultural century.

The Religious Education Council for England and Wales called the findings disappointing but not surprising.

The report highlights low standards, weak teaching, weak examination provision and confusion about the purpose of RE.
In particular, it says the recent introduction of the English Baccalaureate measure for pupils who achieve grade C or above in English, mathematics, science, a language and either history or geography, ignores RE and has further marginalised the subject.

The report echoes comments by the Education Secretary Michael Gove. In July he told religious leaders RE had "suffered" because of government changes.

He said he had thought that because schools have a statutory duty to provide RE lessons the subject was protected.
Ofsted's report, Religious Education: realising the potential, says the subject "plays a key role in promoting social cohesion and the virtues of respect and empathy, which are important in our diverse society" but it finds "many pupils leave school with scant subject knowledge and understanding".

It adds: "Moreover RE teaching often fails to challenge and extend pupils' ability to explore fundamental questions about human life, religion and belief."

Inspectors visited a sample of 185 schools, both primary and secondary, between September 2009 and July 2012.

They found achievement and teaching in RE was less than good in six out of 10 primary schools, and in fewer than half of secondary schools and that not enough had been done to improve provision since a previous report in 2010.
Teaching in primary schools was "not good enough because of weaknesses in teachers understanding of the subject", they found.

Standards were higher for GCSE and sixth form students but even at GCSE level teaching often "failed to secure the core aim of the examination specifications, that is to enable pupils to adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion."

The authors urge the Department for Education (DfE) to consider whether the quality and quantity of statutory RE provision should be left to schools to decide - or specified by central government.
They want the DfE to work with professional RE teaching associations to "clarify the aims and purposes of RE" and to improve teacher training.

Schools should ensure that teaching deepens "pupils' understanding of the nature, diversity and impact of religion and belief in the contemporary world," they urge.
John Keast, chairman of the Religious Education Council for England and Wales said they had been warning "for some time about the poor state of religious education in many schools".

He said they would publish their own report and RE curriculum later in October.

"It is now vital that the DfE works with the Religious Education Council on putting things right. We can do better than this."

Stephen Evans of the National Secular Society said the recommendations did not go far enough.

"With the freedom to determine their own syllabus for RE, many schools with a religious character abuse the subject and use it for missionising.

"Young people would be better served by a new national curriculum subject for all pupils that covers a variety of religious, non-religious and secular philosophies and world views."

“so tell me......”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#3 Oct 7, 2013
Thinking wrote:
There's an easy solution to this: revising the 1944 requirement to teach religion in school. School is for learning. For other stuff, there are mosques, synagogues, temples and the odd church or three.
http://www.secularism.org.uk/religious-educat...
<quoted text>
Was having a bit of a clear out yesterday and found an old school report of my youngest from 1999.
All subjects were good except R.E. in which she only got a C and was noted by the teacher as "must try harder".

According to my eldest they both did not too well in R.E. because they used to challenge the teachers views.

Since: Oct 07

Aberdeen, UK

#5 Oct 7, 2013
one of my lot started Secondary School this year ..there was an open night prior to her starting and we got the chance to see some of the classes in action ..big difference from my days at school but the one that impressed me most was R.E ..boy I would love R.E as taught now ..an exploration and examination of all different faiths and religions with moral discussions on things like euthanasia and abortion ..I could have sat in that class all day ..I told the kids as I left how lucky they were as back in my day we were told what to believe and that was that ..the kids were amazing and most of their points and views were very well thought out and mature

Since: Oct 07

Edinburgh, UK

#7 Oct 8, 2013
Thinking wrote:
People say a lot of horrible things about "yoof" today but most of the teenagers in our neighbourhood are totally decent if you give them a chance.
<quoted text>
Ive found that to be the case here also ..when I had my five youngest in the space of seven years it was more often than not the scariest looking "hoodies" who helped me up down stairs with my pram ,opened doors ,gave up their seats on buses ect for me ..the older generation more often than not didn't...it fair opened my eyes

“so tell me......”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#8 Oct 8, 2013
loveismygoal wrote:
<quoted text>Ive found that to be the case here also ..when I had my five youngest in the space of seven years it was more often than not the scariest looking "hoodies" who helped me up down stairs with my pram ,opened doors ,gave up their seats on buses ect for me ..the older generation more often than not didn't...it fair opened my eyes
Five in 7 years? Gosh you have my admiration. Twice was enough for me.
QUITTNER

Port Perry, Canada

#9 Oct 8, 2013
9:37 am, Tuesday, October 8, 2013:
RE: R.E. in U.K. Schools
..... Given that there are very many religions on this planet, the requirements of which should be taught and enforced in schools and which not?

Since: Oct 07

Sheffield, UK

#11 Oct 8, 2013
angelinaUK wrote:
<quoted text>Five in 7 years? Gosh you have my admiration. Twice was enough for me.
I only asked the Lord for one as well ..Please Lord can I have A baby ..went from having two children to having seven children and two grandchildren in seven years..whoa Lord ..love your sense of humour but gives a break at least I eventually said ..my motto now be careful what you pray for

Since: Oct 07

Sheffield, UK

#12 Oct 8, 2013
one of the kids corrected me ..it is now know here as R.M.P studies ..religous ,moral and philosophical studies .I loved on the night I sat in on a class how they had the freedom to explore and examine and express their individual viewpoints each putting forward their own perspective in a mature way ..they put Topix Christian forum to shame

Since: Oct 07

Sheffield, UK

#13 Oct 8, 2013
little lamb

South Yarra, Australia

#14 Oct 8, 2013
God has always placed responsibility on FATHERS, to bring their children up in the mental regulation of Jehovah.

Christians have just presumed that 'strangers' to the covenant, can teach their children better.

Jesus warned 'friendship with the world means enmity with God.'

fancy even expecting a government run school to teach in opposition to themselves..

“so tell me......”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#15 Oct 9, 2013
little lamb wrote:
God has always placed responsibility on FATHERS, to bring their children up in the mental regulation of Jehovah.
Christians have just presumed that 'strangers' to the covenant, can teach their children better.
Jesus warned 'friendship with the world means enmity with God.'
fancy even expecting a government run school to teach in opposition to themselves..
A lot of children don't know who their fathers are now days.
Thinking

Royston, UK

#16 Oct 9, 2013
Yet your bible says jesus would undermine families.
little lamb wrote:
God has always placed responsibility on FATHERS, to bring their children up in the mental regulation of Jehovah.
Christians have just presumed that 'strangers' to the covenant, can teach their children better.
Jesus warned 'friendship with the world means enmity with God.'
fancy even expecting a government run school to teach in opposition to themselves..

“so tell me......”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#17 Oct 9, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Yet your bible says jesus would undermine families.
<quoted text>
Not quite. It is belief in Jesus that can split a family when not all family members agree in their beliefs and faith.
Thinking

Royston, UK

#18 Oct 9, 2013
Cult speak.
Same sh!t, different bucket.
angelinaUK wrote:
<quoted text>Not quite. It is belief in Jesus that can split a family when not all family members agree in their beliefs and faith.
little lamb

South Yarra, Australia

#19 Oct 9, 2013
angelinaUK wrote:
<quoted text>Not quite. It is belief in Jesus that can split a family when not all family members agree in their beliefs and faith.
Good post...some are for truth and others not..it is usually the ones not for truth who persecute the ones for truth.
little lamb

South Yarra, Australia

#20 Oct 9, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Yet your bible says jesus would undermine families.
<quoted text>
That is why Christians are under command ' to marry in the Lord'

Strong Christian families are the result.
little lamb

South Yarra, Australia

#21 Oct 9, 2013
angelinaUK wrote:
<quoted text>A lot of children don't know who their fathers are now days.
That is the beauty of a unified faith in Christ..because true religion is to care for the widows and orphans in their tribulation.

So mothers who come to Christ , with fatherless children...have to take on some of the responsibility of teaching their sons, just as Timothy's had the faith of his mother Eunice, and Grandmother Lois.

Christian mothers have to take God on his promise , that the Holy Spirit is promised to them and their children...God will help them, they have a helper..the Holy Spirit.

But the commandment 'to bring up a child in the mental regulation of Jehovah' is for Fathers, that are Christian , not their wives.

but mothers can do it..if no father..for 'in the Lord there is neither male nor female , for you are all one person in Christ Jesus'
Thinking

Royston, UK

#22 Oct 10, 2013
Plenty of other religions are equally oppressive.
Most or all of you must be wrong.
little lamb wrote:
<quoted text>
That is why Christians are under command ' to marry in the Lord'
Strong Christian families are the result.

“so tell me......”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#23 Oct 10, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Cult speak.
Same sh!t, different bucket.
<quoted text>
As the saying goes;
The devil is in the details.

The judge it icons aren't mine by the way.
Thinking

Royston, UK

#24 Oct 10, 2013
I don't negatively judge you - or anyone else that behaves, either.
angelinaUK wrote:
<quoted text>As the saying goes;
The devil is in the details.
The judge it icons aren't mine by the way.

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