What's the Christian meaning to Thanksgiving?

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Since: Sep 08

Anderson, IN

#1 Nov 18, 2012
Is there one?

“SCOTUS will Rule in June for”

Since: Aug 08

MARRIAGE EQUALITY:-)

#3 Nov 18, 2012
Save A Turkey Sock wrote:
Who better than me can speak of Thanksgiving?
Thanksgiving is a secular holiday and not a religious one. As with most holidays it has become commercialized and gluttonous. The up side is the gathering of families and friends and sharing in love. The down side is the many that do not get to participate in that bounty and love.
As a Christian, we should give thanks always, and share in loving kindness with others what we have that is more than necessity and they may lack.
This makes me tremble:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/...
\|/~\|/
Should we also not eat turkey anymore on Thanksgiving? I mean what better way to say thanks by having turkey.....and turkey sandwiches are just wonderful to eat the next day........yummy......oh, sorry, how insensitive of me.......<leaves with head down>

“THE HEAT IS ON”

Since: Apr 12

Satan IS in "The Church"

#4 Nov 18, 2012
NorCal Native wrote:
<quoted text>
Should we also not eat turkey anymore on Thanksgiving? I mean what better way to say thanks by having turkey.....and turkey sandwiches are just wonderful to eat the next day........yummy......oh, sorry, how insensitive of me.......<leaves with head down>
LOLOL. Although some people go out and kill wild turkeys, the majority in this country are confinement raised. That means they are going to be slaughtered one way or another unless they are layers or toms kept for reproductive purposes.

Sad but true.~Sniff~ So unless one is a vegetarian, they will be selecting the meat of the day. Turkey's just happen to be top of the list for that day. I believe Ham is rather popular at Christmas, so it's the piggies turn to run and hide.

;o~

“SCOTUS will Rule in June for”

Since: Aug 08

MARRIAGE EQUALITY:-)

#5 Nov 18, 2012
Hell Sucks wrote:
<quoted text>
LOLOL. Although some people go out and kill wild turkeys, the majority in this country are confinement raised. That means they are going to be slaughtered one way or another unless they are layers or toms kept for reproductive purposes.
Sad but true.~Sniff~ So unless one is a vegetarian, they will be selecting the meat of the day. Turkey's just happen to be top of the list for that day. I believe Ham is rather popular at Christmas, so it's the piggies turn to run and hide.
;o~
Oh so true.......and I'm not crazy about wild bird or pig for that matter.......we have wild turkeys that roam the streets freely......some are really big and fat......lol!!!
QUITTNER

Toronto, Canada

#6 Nov 18, 2012
1;31 PM, Sunday, November 18, 2012:
RE: What's the Christian meaning to Thanksgiving?
..... It is quite wrong to give thanks on only one day per year. Many people give thanks for every meal too, and there are many other occasions too. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

“THE HEAT IS ON”

Since: Apr 12

Satan IS in "The Church"

#7 Nov 18, 2012
NorCal Native wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh so true.......and I'm not crazy about wild bird or pig for that matter.......we have wild turkeys that roam the streets freely......some are really big and fat......lol!!!
Do they gobble a lot?? LOLOL

;o~
MRSMURPHY

Chicago, IL

#8 Nov 18, 2012
THE NATIONAL DAY OF MOURNING
On Thanksgiving Day, many Native Americans and their supporters gather at the top of Coles Hill, overlooking Plymouth Rock, for the "National Day of Mourning."
The first National Day of Mourning was held in 1970. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts invited Wampanoag leader Frank James to deliver a speech. When the text of Mr. Jamesí speech, a powerful statement of anger at the history of oppression of the Native people of America, became known before the event, the Commonwealth "disinvited" him. That silencing of a strong and honest Native voice led to the convening of the National Day of Mourning.
The historical event we know today as the "First Thanksgiving" was a harvest festival held in 1621 by the Pilgrims and their Native American neighbors and allies. It has acquired significance beyond the bare historical facts. Thanksgiving has become a much broader symbol of the entirety of the American experience. Many find this a cause for rejoicing. The dissenting view of Native Americans, who have suffered the theft of their lands and the destruction of their traditional way of life at the hands of the American nation, is equally valid.
To some, the "First Thanksgiving" presents a distorted picture of the history of relations between the European colonists and their descendants and the Native People. The total emphasis is placed on the respect that existed between the Wampanoags led by the sachem Massasoit and the first generation of Pilgrims in Plymouth, while the long history of subsequent violence and discrimination suffered by Native People across America is nowhere represented.
To others, the event shines forth as an example of the respect that was possible once, if only for the brief span of a single generation in a single place, between two different cultures and as a vision of what may again be possible someday among people of goodwill.
History is not a set of "truths" to be memorized, history is an ongoing process of interpretation and learning. The true richness and depth of history come from multiplicity and complexity, from debate and disagreement and dialogue. There is room for more than one history; there is room for many voices.
COMMENTS ON THE DAY OF MOURNING
BY RUSSELL M. PETERS
Russell Peters is Wampanoag, born and raised in Mashpee, less than twenty miles from Plymouth Rock. Mashpee was considered an Indian community and was, in fact, an Indian District within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, until it was illegally dissolved in 1870.
Mr. Peters has been involved in Native American issues at a state, local and national level. He is the President of the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribal Council, a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from 1976 to 1984, a member of the Harvard Peabody Museum Native American Repatriation Committee, a member of the White House Conference on Federal Recognition in 1995 and 1996, a board member of the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, a board member of the Pilgrim Society, and the author of Wampanoags of Mashpee (Nimrod Press), Clambake (Lerner Publications), and Regalia (Sundance Press).
Mr. Petersí notes that the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribal Council is constantly working to improve the spiritual and material lives of their people. They are not opposed to demonstrations but are opposed to needless confrontations that serve no purpose for the Native American people they purport to serve.

.http://www.pilgrimhall.org/da ymourn.htm

Since: Sep 08

Anderson, IN

#9 Nov 18, 2012
MRSMURPHY wrote:
THE NATIONAL DAY OF MOURNING
On Thanksgiving Day, many Native Americans and their supporters gather at the top of Coles Hill, overlooking Plymouth Rock, for the "National Day of Mourning."
The first National Day of Mourning was held in 1970. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts invited Wampanoag leader Frank James to deliver a speech. When the text of Mr. Jamesí speech, a powerful statement of anger at the history of oppression of the Native people of America, became known before the event, the Commonwealth "disinvited" him. That silencing of a strong and honest Native voice led to the convening of the National Day of Mourning.
The historical event we know today as the "First Thanksgiving" was a harvest festival held in 1621 by the Pilgrims and their Native American neighbors and allies. It has acquired significance beyond the bare historical facts. Thanksgiving has become a much broader symbol of the entirety of the American experience. Many find this a cause for rejoicing. The dissenting view of Native Americans, who have suffered the theft of their lands and the destruction of their traditional way of life at the hands of the American nation, is equally valid.
To some, the "First Thanksgiving" presents a distorted picture of the history of relations between the European colonists and their descendants and the Native People. The total emphasis is placed on the respect that existed between the Wampanoags led by the sachem Massasoit and the first generation of Pilgrims in Plymouth, while the long history of subsequent violence and discrimination suffered by Native People across America is nowhere represented.
To others, the event shines forth as an example of the respect that was possible once, if only for the brief span of a single generation in a single place, between two different cultures and as a vision of what may again be possible someday among people of goodwill.
History is not a set of "truths" to be memorized, history is an ongoing process of interpretation and learning. The true richness and depth of history come from multiplicity and complexity, from debate and disagreement and dialogue. There is room for more than one history; there is room for many voices.
COMMENTS ON THE DAY OF MOURNING
BY RUSSELL M. PETERS
Russell Peters is Wampanoag, born and raised in Mashpee, less than twenty miles from Plymouth Rock. Mashpee was considered an Indian community and was, in fact, an Indian District within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, until it was illegally dissolved in 1870.
Mr. Peters has been involved in Native American issues at a state, local and national level. He is the President of the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribal Council, a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from 1976 to 1984, a member of the Harvard Peabody Museum Native American Repatriation Committee, a member of the White House Conference on Federal Recognition in 1995 and 1996, a board member of the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, a board member of the Pilgrim Society, and the author of Wampanoags of Mashpee (Nimrod Press), Clambake (Lerner Publications), and Regalia (Sundance Press).
Mr. Petersí notes that the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribal Council is constantly working to improve the spiritual and material lives of their people. They are not opposed to demonstrations but are opposed to needless confrontations that serve no purpose for the Native American people they purport to serve.
.http://www.pilgrimhall.org/da ymourn.htm
This is really good, MRS MURPHY and something worth contemplating, as well.
Thinking

Andover, UK

#11 Nov 19, 2012
Looking at how things turned out for the existing population, it's clearly a time to take food from someone else and then require them to live by your rules.

I've got an American catholic friend hosting us on Thursday. I fully intend to eat his food and then make him an unbeliever.

“Invisible Pink Unicorn”

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#12 Nov 19, 2012
Hell Sucks wrote:
<quoted text>
LOLOL. Although some people go out and kill wild turkeys, the majority in this country are confinement raised. That means they are going to be slaughtered one way or another unless they are layers or toms kept for reproductive purposes.
Sad but true.~Sniff~ So unless one is a vegetarian, they will be selecting the meat of the day. Turkey's just happen to be top of the list for that day. I believe Ham is rather popular at Christmas, so it's the piggies turn to run and hide.
;o~
Wild turkeys all dark meat yummy yummy.

Since: Sep 08

Anderson, IN

#13 Nov 19, 2012
Philippians 4:11 Translations
King James Version (KJV)
Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.

----------

Content with whatever state you are in. Not that you may not want to upgrade your state if you are suffering, but to be content in that state while you are there. In all and any state.

“so tell me......”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#14 Nov 19, 2012
An American friend posted a little cartton on facebook yesterday.
It said something like only in America could you have the black Friday sales scramble the day after being thankful for what you have.

As for the Christian meaning, why does there have to be a Christian meaning behind it? Everyone is capable of being thankful.

“THE HEAT IS ON”

Since: Apr 12

Satan IS in "The Church"

#15 Nov 19, 2012
Cookie_Parker wrote:
Philippians 4:11 Translations
King James Version (KJV)
Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.
----------
Content with whatever state you are in. Not that you may not want to upgrade your state if you are suffering, but to be content in that state while you are there. In all and any state.
Alas, my state is not in the Union. Being content with chronic suffering is asking a lot of any human. NO ONE should be "content" with a life of misery. Wouldn't death be a far greater reward??

Since: Sep 08

Anderson, IN

#17 Nov 19, 2012
Hell Sucks wrote:
<quoted text>
Alas, my state is not in the Union. Being content with chronic suffering is asking a lot of any human. NO ONE should be "content" with a life of misery. Wouldn't death be a far greater reward??
You need to improve your lot...and improve your situation...being content that you are moving forward and seeking to do everything you can do should bring contentment....?

“Wear white at night.”

Since: Jun 09

Albuquerque

#18 Nov 19, 2012
Cookie_Parker wrote:
<quoted text>
This is really good, MRS MURPHY and something worth contemplating, as well.
Indians don't have much to celebrate, do they. I do try to do something special, however, on Iroquois Strawberry Day and the anniversary of Custer's Last Stand.

“Wear white at night.”

Since: Jun 09

Albuquerque

#19 Nov 19, 2012
angelinaUK wrote:
An American friend posted a little cartton on facebook yesterday.
It said something like only in America could you have the black Friday sales scramble the day after being thankful for what you have.
As for the Christian meaning, why does there have to be a Christian meaning behind it? Everyone is capable of being thankful.
Thanksgiving is a US holiday, not a Christian holiday. Still, my little Mexican mission church will have a special service at 11:00 rather than the usual 7:00 AM service because we should all be thankful. Some of us are thankful to still be breathing, some are thankful for other stuff. I'm thankful I found that little mission church.

It looked like it was just going to be me and Deacon H this morning but a family of four showed up at the last minute. The reading fell to me, from Revelation. It makes sense, as the liturgical year comes to an end we focus on John the Revelator's drug crazed speculation regarding the Second Coming of Christ and after the feast of Christ the King this coming Sunday we get back to focusing on the First Coming of Christ.

Seems a bit odd, doing the same thing day after day and week after week and year after year for maybe two thousand years, all in anticipation of the Second Coming of Christ. Wouldn't it just be poetic, not to mention Biblical, justice for Christ to finally get around to coming back, only to find the human race as already long gone extinct?

“THE HEAT IS ON”

Since: Apr 12

Satan IS in "The Church"

#21 Nov 19, 2012
Cookie_Parker wrote:
<quoted text>
You need to improve your lot...and improve your situation...being content that you are moving forward and seeking to do everything you can do should bring contentment....?
O.K.



What Faith Can Do lyrics
Songwriters: Davis, Scott; Krippayne, Scott;

Everybody falls sometimes
Gotta find the strength to rise
From the ashes
And make a new beginning

Anyone can feel the ache
You think it's more than you can take
But you're stronger
Stronger than you know

Don't you give up now
The sun will soon be shining
You gotta face the clouds
To find the silver lining

I've seen dreams that move the mountains
Hope that doesn't ever end
Even when the sky is falling
I've seen miracles just happen
Silent prayers get answered
Broken hearts become brand new
That's what faith can do

It doesn't matter what you've heard
Impossible is not a word
It's just a reason
For someone not to try

Everybody's scared to death
When they decide to take that step
Out on the water
It'll be alright

Life is so much more
Than what your eyes are seeing
You will find your way
If you keep believing

I've seen dreams that move the mountains
Hope that doesn't ever end
Even when the sky is falling
I've seen miracles just happen
Silent prayers get answered
Broken hearts become brand new
That's what faith can do

Overcome the odds
You don't have a chance
(That's what faith can do)
When the world says you can't
It'll tell you that you can

I've seen dreams that move the mountains
Hope that doesn't ever end
Even when the sky is falling
And I've seen miracles just happen
Silent prayers get answered
Broken hearts become brand new
That's what faith can do
That's what faith can do

Even if you fall sometimes
You will have the strength to rise
~~~~~~~~~~

Like that??

Since: Sep 08

Anderson, IN

#23 Nov 20, 2012
15th Dalai Lama wrote:
<quoted text>
Thanksgiving is a US holiday, not a Christian holiday. Still, my little Mexican mission church will have a special service at 11:00 rather than the usual 7:00 AM service because we should all be thankful. Some of us are thankful to still be breathing, some are thankful for other stuff. I'm thankful I found that little mission church.
It looked like it was just going to be me and Deacon H this morning but a family of four showed up at the last minute. The reading fell to me, from Revelation. It makes sense, as the liturgical year comes to an end we focus on John the Revelator's drug crazed speculation regarding the Second Coming of Christ and after the feast of Christ the King this coming Sunday we get back to focusing on the First Coming of Christ.
Seems a bit odd, doing the same thing day after day and week after week and year after year for maybe two thousand years, all in anticipation of the Second Coming of Christ. Wouldn't it just be poetic, not to mention Biblical, justice for Christ to finally get around to coming back, only to find the human race as already long gone extinct?
Whoa....that would be something. We keep up clamoring for wars and that could very well be what happens.

Since: Sep 08

Anderson, IN

#24 Nov 20, 2012
Hell Sucks wrote:
<quoted text>
O.K.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =kQp75TsnpSAXX
What Faith Can Do lyrics
Songwriters: Davis, Scott; Krippayne, Scott;
Everybody falls sometimes
Gotta find the strength to rise
From the ashes
And make a new beginning
Anyone can feel the ache
You think it's more than you can take
But you're stronger
Stronger than you know
Don't you give up now
The sun will soon be shining
You gotta face the clouds
To find the silver lining
I've seen dreams that move the mountains
Hope that doesn't ever end
Even when the sky is falling
I've seen miracles just happen
Silent prayers get answered
Broken hearts become brand new
That's what faith can do
It doesn't matter what you've heard
Impossible is not a word
It's just a reason
For someone not to try
Everybody's scared to death
When they decide to take that step
Out on the water
It'll be alright
Life is so much more
Than what your eyes are seeing
You will find your way
If you keep believing
I've seen dreams that move the mountains
Hope that doesn't ever end
Even when the sky is falling
I've seen miracles just happen
Silent prayers get answered
Broken hearts become brand new
That's what faith can do
Overcome the odds
You don't have a chance
(That's what faith can do)
When the world says you can't
It'll tell you that you can
I've seen dreams that move the mountains
Hope that doesn't ever end
Even when the sky is falling
And I've seen miracles just happen
Silent prayers get answered
Broken hearts become brand new
That's what faith can do
That's what faith can do
Even if you fall sometimes
You will have the strength to rise
~~~~~~~~~~
Like that??
Good one...now find the reason to rise.

Since: Sep 08

Anderson, IN

#25 Nov 20, 2012
15th Dalai Lama wrote:
<quoted text>
Indians don't have much to celebrate, do they. I do try to do something special, however, on Iroquois Strawberry Day and the anniversary of Custer's Last Stand.
No, indeed, they do not. It's our karma...and look around...it's coming.

I DO love the native american tribes who have embraced gambling and taken money from the white gamblers, though.

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