The Religious Right are hypocrites: P...

The Religious Right are hypocrites: PROOF!

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Since: Feb 10

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#1 Jun 10, 2013
The religious right in America are the most politically conservative people. Their mantra, shared by all far-right conservatives, is that the federal government should have limited power. They preach smaller federal government, less (or no) federal government intervention, etc.

To bolster their argument they cite example after example of how the federal government intrudes into people's lives, and how it cannot run anything 9except, of course, for the military.)

At the same time, the religious right constantly clamor to "Put God back in Government." They want public schools to start the day with the Lord's Prayer. They want the Genesis account of creation taught in science classes. And they want the Ten Commandments posted in every classroom, to remind all children that God is watching them.

Do you see the disconnect? Have you figured out why they are hypocrites? If you can, then you're not one of them.

And if you can't, it's simple: they want the very same inefficient and intrusive federal government they claim should be weakened and made smaller to become larger and more intrusive.

This is their argument: "The federal government can't do anything right and should stay out of people's lives, except when it comes to forcing people to adopt Christian ethics and principles."

They don't want the government out of people's lives at all. they actually want the federal government to intrude into the lives of people whom the religious right labels non-Christian, or not-Christian enough.

It is the duty of every secular humanist, every religious humanist, and every patriotic American to stand up and call these people out for what they are: hypocrites.

Power-hungry, deceitful, dangerous hypocrites.
Job

Santa Clara, CA

#2 Jun 11, 2013
Some things to consider:

Very early American history. The founding fathers who we praise, and rightly so, for our freedoms that are unlike any other (whether or not that is changing is another issue), did not want a European type 'theocracy'(which was never really a theocracy in the true sense). Thus, their "religious tolerance" has lead to the freedom of speech, belief, right to pursue happiness, etc that we benefit from today.

However, as tolerant as they were, are they more tolerant than today's American Christians? It could easily be argued 'no'.

Apparently, the majority who were Christians were not to fond of deists...at first. But we can see that even the still existing laws in some States that require a belief in a Creator to run for office caters to deists, not just Christians. However, there's no visible evidence for tolerance of 'atheists'. They didn't like atheist for some reason back then. They seemed to be more tolerant of Muslims than atheists.'Today', Christians by comparison,'tolerate' atheists. This was a progressive change towards this 'tolerance'.

What atheists are generally upset about is Christians who use their freedom of speech to express their view that America's withdrawal from God is not a good thing. We Christians understand full well that because we live in a freedom of choice society, everyone has a right to choose what they wish to believe. The vast majority of Christians are not politicians. They don't want to intrude on anyone's rights. Every Christian I know minds their own business. They do 'not' want a European-like historical empire where people are 'forced' to confess Christianity.

What upsets atheists is when Christians gather together for things like prayer meetings that do not hurt anyone. Hold bible studies in their homes where there's about 50 or so people (there are house parties that have more than that).

Think about it, as many Christians as there have been throughout American history; atheism, agnosticism, Buddhism, hinduism, Islam, could easily have been outlawed.

“Diana Sieglerhoffen ”

Since: Oct 09

Leiden, Netherlands

#3 Jun 11, 2013
HighlyEvolved wrote:
The religious right in America are the most politically conservative people. Their mantra, shared by all far-right conservatives, is that the federal government should have limited power. They preach smaller federal government, less (or no) federal government intervention, etc.
To bolster their argument they cite example after example of how the federal government intrudes into people's lives, and how it cannot run anything 9except, of course, for the military.)
At the same time, the religious right constantly clamor to "Put God back in Government." They want public schools to start the day with the Lord's Prayer. They want the Genesis account of creation taught in science classes. And they want the Ten Commandments posted in every classroom, to remind all children that God is watching them.
Do you see the disconnect? Have you figured out why they are hypocrites? If you can, then you're not one of them.
And if you can't, it's simple: they want the very same inefficient and intrusive federal government they claim should be weakened and made smaller to become larger and more intrusive.
This is their argument: "The federal government can't do anything right and should stay out of people's lives, except when it comes to forcing people to adopt Christian ethics and principles."
They don't want the government out of people's lives at all. they actually want the federal government to intrude into the lives of people whom the religious right labels non-Christian, or not-Christian enough.
It is the duty of every secular humanist, every religious humanist, and every patriotic American to stand up and call these people out for what they are: hypocrites.
Power-hungry, deceitful, dangerous hypocrites.
Very well said. The evangelicals have ruined the Republican party which actually had some sound core values but is now only a sad puppet for the Dominionist Evangelical Fascists.

They also are against abortion but they have no concern for the babies after they are born into a hopeless life in a ghetto or in some drug infested hell hole hollow in WV or Ky.

“Diana Sieglerhoffen ”

Since: Oct 09

Leiden, Netherlands

#4 Jun 11, 2013
Job wrote:
Some things to consider:
Very early American history. The founding fathers who we praise, and rightly so, for our freedoms that are unlike any other (whether or not that is changing is another issue), did not want a European type 'theocracy'(which was never really a theocracy in the true sense). Thus, their "religious tolerance" has lead to the freedom of speech, belief, right to pursue happiness, etc that we benefit from today.
However, as tolerant as they were, are they more tolerant than today's American Christians? It could easily be argued 'no'.
Apparently, the majority who were Christians were not to fond of deists...at first. But we can see that even the still existing laws in some States that require a belief in a Creator to run for office caters to deists, not just Christians. However, there's no visible evidence for tolerance of 'atheists'. They didn't like atheist for some reason back then. They seemed to be more tolerant of Muslims than atheists.'Today', Christians by comparison,'tolerate' atheists. This was a progressive change towards this 'tolerance'.
What atheists are generally upset about is Christians who use their freedom of speech to express their view that America's withdrawal from God is not a good thing. We Christians understand full well that because we live in a freedom of choice society, everyone has a right to choose what they wish to believe. The vast majority of Christians are not politicians. They don't want to intrude on anyone's rights. Every Christian I know minds their own business. They do 'not' want a European-like historical empire where people are 'forced' to confess Christianity.
What upsets atheists is when Christians gather together for things like prayer meetings that do not hurt anyone. Hold bible studies in their homes where there's about 50 or so people (there are house parties that have more than that).
Think about it, as many Christians as there have been throughout American history; atheism, agnosticism, Buddhism, hinduism, Islam, could easily have been outlawed.
No one cares if christians hold prayer meetings in their homes,churches or other private property. They cross the line when they want to put their religion into government where obviously those founding fathers agreed it didn't belong.

Times have changed a lot since 1776. Back then the average person had very little if any education and information was not so easily obtained. Most people never traveled far from the town they were born in and tended to believe whatever was commonly believed in their communities which was Christianity for most. Anyone who has every studied folklore can tell you that. The European immigrants bought with them to the new world their superstitions and traditions from the communities they hailed from.

Today,we have the world at our finger tips and we can use that information to form our own opinions and some of us have decided that modern scientific information trumps ancient books of superstition written by goat and sheep herders.

Now, if you want to live your life based on unproven superstitions that is your right to do so and you have the right to teach them to your children. You do not have the right to teach them to other people's children in public schools.

“Of Course I Can”

Since: Sep 08

Wilson, NC

#5 Jun 11, 2013
One of the most right wing republicans there was from back in the day, had this to say about relgion and government:

On religious issues there can be little or no compromise. There is no position on which people are so immovable as their religious beliefs. There is no more powerful ally one can claim in a debate than Jesus Christ, or God, or Allah, or whatever one calls this supreme being. But like any powerful weapon, the use of God's name on one's behalf should be used sparingly. The religious factions that are growing throughout our land are not using their religious clout with wisdom. They are trying to force government leaders into following their position 100 percent. If you disagree with these religious groups on a particular moral issue, they complain, they threaten you with a loss of money or votes or both.
I'm frankly sick and tired of the political preachers across this country telling me as a citizen that if I want to be a moral person, I must believe in "A," "B," "C" and "D." Just who do they think they are? And from where do they presume to claim the right to dictate their moral beliefs to me?
And I am even more angry as a legislator who must endure the threats of every religious group who thinks it has some God-granted right to control my vote on every roll call in the Senate. I am warning them today: I will fight them every step of the way if they try to dictate their moral convictions to all Americans in the name of "conservatism."

Too bad he didn't live long enough to carry out his threat because right wing "christians"are ruining our country and our government.

“Of Course I Can”

Since: Sep 08

Wilson, NC

#6 Jun 11, 2013
Oh, by the way, that was Barry Goldwater. Forgot to add that and the link.

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Barry_Goldwater

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#7 Jun 11, 2013
Job wrote:
Some things to consider:
Very early American history. The founding fathers who we praise, and rightly so, for our freedoms that are unlike any other (whether or not that is changing is another issue), did not want a European type 'theocracy'(which was never really a theocracy in the true sense). Thus, their "religious tolerance" has lead to the freedom of speech, belief, right to pursue happiness, etc that we benefit from today.
However, as tolerant as they were, are they more tolerant than today's American Christians? It could easily be argued 'no'.
Apparently, the majority who were Christians were not to fond of deists...at first. But we can see that even the still existing laws in some States that require a belief in a Creator to run for office caters to deists, not just Christians. However, there's no visible evidence for tolerance of 'atheists'. They didn't like atheist for some reason back then. They seemed to be more tolerant of Muslims than atheists.'Today', Christians by comparison,'tolerate' atheists. This was a progressive change towards this 'tolerance'.
What atheists are generally upset about is Christians who use their freedom of speech to express their view that America's withdrawal from God is not a good thing. We Christians understand full well that because we live in a freedom of choice society, everyone has a right to choose what they wish to believe. The vast majority of Christians are not politicians. They don't want to intrude on anyone's rights. Every Christian I know minds their own business. They do 'not' want a European-like historical empire where people are 'forced' to confess Christianity.
What upsets atheists is when Christians gather together for things like prayer meetings that do not hurt anyone. Hold bible studies in their homes where there's about 50 or so people (there are house parties that have more than that).
Think about it, as many Christians as there have been throughout American history; atheism, agnosticism, Buddhism, hinduism, Islam, could easily have been outlawed.
You're exactly right on every point, except one: atheists aren't upset by Christians (or anyone else) freely exercising their faith.

What makes us mad is when religious groups (which most of the time are Christian, since the U.S. is predominantly populated by Christians) attempt to engage the government to help them promote their faith.

I am just as opposed to Muslims trying to get an exemption for photo IDs as I am to nativity displays on public lands.

In my opinion, there should be a total separation between church and state. The only time the government should take a stand is when someone's right to worship is being threatened, or when hate crimes are committed against a person or group because of their religious beliefs (or lack thereof.)

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#8 Jun 11, 2013
paganbirdkeeper666 wrote:
<quoted text>
Very well said. The evangelicals have ruined the Republican party which actually had some sound core values but is now only a sad puppet for the Dominionist Evangelical Fascists.
They also are against abortion but they have no concern for the babies after they are born into a hopeless life in a ghetto or in some drug infested hell hole hollow in WV or Ky.
I used to be a Nixon Republican. Ronald Reagan pushed me out of the party. I flirted with becoming a Democrat, but ended up voting for Libertarian candidate David Bergland in 1984.

Then in 1988 Ron Paul scared me away, and I was unaffiliated (Independent) until 1996, when I joined the Green Party.

Lately my mantra is "Anything BUT Democrats or Republicans." We won't really have a representative republic until the two major parties make up less than two-thirds of Congress.
Job

Santa Clara, CA

#9 Jun 11, 2013
paganbirdkeeper666 wrote:
<quoted text>
No one cares if christians hold prayer meetings in their homes,churches or other private property. They cross the line when they want to put their religion into government where obviously those founding fathers agreed it didn't belong.
Times have changed a lot since 1776. Back then the average person had very little if any education and information was not so easily obtained. Most people never traveled far from the town they were born in and tended to believe whatever was commonly believed in their communities which was Christianity for most. Anyone who has every studied folklore can tell you that. The European immigrants bought with them to the new world their superstitions and traditions from the communities they hailed from.
Today,we have the world at our finger tips and we can use that information to form our own opinions and some of us have decided that modern scientific information trumps ancient books of superstition written by goat and sheep herders.
Now, if you want to live your life based on unproven superstitions that is your right to do so and you have the right to teach them to your children. You do not have the right to teach them to other people's children in public schools.
When I refer to prayer meetings, Bible studies, etc., I'm referring to public calls (invitations) to Christians on a wide scale. Sometimes involving occupying a complex like a sports venue, civic auditorium, etc. It gets more dicey of course when a politician is involved.

As far as home bible studies, I'm referring specific instances where the hosts are "fined" for holding them, as in a fairly recent case (although there have been a number of them) in San Juan Capistrano, CA (in this case the hosts eventually 'won' the case).
Job

Santa Clara, CA

#10 Jun 11, 2013
HighlyEvolved wrote:
<quoted text>
You're exactly right on every point, except one: atheists aren't upset by Christians (or anyone else) freely exercising their faith.
What makes us mad is when religious groups (which most of the time are Christian, since the U.S. is predominantly populated by Christians) attempt to engage the government to help them promote their faith.
I am just as opposed to Muslims trying to get an exemption for photo IDs as I am to nativity displays on public lands.
In my opinion, there should be a total separation between church and state. The only time the government should take a stand is when someone's right to worship is being threatened, or when hate crimes are committed against a person or group because of their religious beliefs (or lack thereof.)
To try and even things about a bit, what people oppose (right or left, religious or atheist) is going to 'vary'. And this can be where the problem (or even danger?) may lie.

If we use history as a guide-line, this may help a bit. History has revealed to us that it's possible for a nation to make a certain religion a mandated law. Generally, as in the case of historical Christian Europe, Christian mandated law has always involved a ruling 'denomination'. So theoretically, there 'is' a possibility of this happening again. And of course, as like with our founding fathers, should be 'avoided'.

History also shows the potential for 'anti-religion' or 'anti-theism' to produce similar negative effects as witnessed in communist countries and regimes like the Khmer Rouge.

I respect your opinion, and really have no problem with being confronted for 'hypocrisy'(as myself being an evangelical Christian). However, who's to say what 'your' promoted sentiment may ultimately contribute to or produce? You may have certain limitations concerning your view of Christian activity, but it's not the same for everyone else.

There's obviously (I think) much stronger sentiment than yours that religion should be completely removed from society. If this sentiment grows this could potentially be a problem, even possibly for you. For instance, it could effect personal family members who are Christian. An uncle or cousin getting thrown in jail for possessing a Bible (as history reveals this as possible).

Also, there's an assumption that the anti-theism that atheist activist groups like "Freedom From Religion" promote, which is pretty much relegated to Judeo-Christianity, wouldn't effect 'other' religions like Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam....or even Native American religion. Passing the "anti-theism" baton so to speak has no basic human-rights guarantees for the future.

Again, we have history to thank for foresight considerations.

dollarsbill

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#11 Jun 11, 2013
The US Government is FILLED with liars. Only the ignorant trust them. You have been sold out folks. God is bringing the curtain down.

Revelation 13:7 (NKJV)
7 And authority was given him over every tribe, tongue, and nation.

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#12 Jun 11, 2013
dollarsbill wrote:
The US Government is FILLED with liars.
Yes, and they're all Christians.

Checkmate.

dollarsbill

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#13 Jun 12, 2013
HighlyEvolved wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, and they're all Christians.
Checkmate.
Christians are ruling over you?

“Diana Sieglerhoffen ”

Since: Oct 09

Leiden, Netherlands

#14 Jun 12, 2013
Job wrote:
<quoted text>
When I refer to prayer meetings, Bible studies, etc., I'm referring to public calls (invitations) to Christians on a wide scale. Sometimes involving occupying a complex like a sports venue, civic auditorium, etc. It gets more dicey of course when a politician is involved.
As far as home bible studies, I'm referring specific instances where the hosts are "fined" for holding them, as in a fairly recent case (although there have been a number of them) in San Juan Capistrano, CA (in this case the hosts eventually 'won' the case).
Are you talking about churches renting these facilities for meetings or are you talking about Christians holding prayer at sporting events or shows?
The former is legal,anyone can rent time and space in public auditoriums and parks etc.
The later it should not be legal for Christians or any other religion to hock their beliefs on people who have paid to watch a sporting event or show.

Recently in Florida some Pagans rented space at marina for a festival and all the Christians in that area tried to stop them and even said they would picket their festival. Also,a few yrs ago in Oklahoma, a satanic church rented the city hall to hold a public ritual on Halloween and the Christians there picked outside. I have never heard of Pagans or Satanists doing that to Christians when they rent space for their meetings and gospel concerts.

“Diana Sieglerhoffen ”

Since: Oct 09

Leiden, Netherlands

#15 Jun 12, 2013
dollarsbill wrote:
<quoted text>
Christians are ruling over you?
http://youtu.be/idVjnCl4oFM

Since: Sep 08

Neon City Oh.

#16 Jun 12, 2013
“The real reason that we can’t have the Ten Commandments in a courthouse: You cannot post “Thou shalt not steal,”“Thou shalt not commit adultery,” and “Thou shalt not lie” in a building full of lawyers, judges, and politicians. It creates a hostile work environment.”

&#8213; George Carlin

dollarsbill

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#17 Jun 12, 2013
WDRussell wrote:
“The real reason that we can’t have the Ten Commandments in a courthouse: You cannot post “Thou shalt not steal,”“Thou shalt not commit adultery,” and “Thou shalt not lie” in a building full of lawyers, judges, and politicians. It creates a hostile work environment.”
&#8213; George Carlin
LOL!!!

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#18 Jun 12, 2013
dollarsbill wrote:
<quoted text>
Christians are ruling over you?
Do you doubt that the members of Congress are almost all Christians?

If so, you're an even bigger idiot than previously determined.
little lamb

Australia

#19 Jun 12, 2013
No Christian would be involved in politics

politics comes from the word 'polis' city..and Christians are taught in Hebrews ..that ' we do not have a city here that continues, but earnestly seek the one to come'

Satan offered Jesus all the kingdoms of the world , if he would do an act of worship to him.

He told Jesus , they had been delivered to him, and he can give them to whom he likes.

Jesus is returning with the legal right to rule the nations...Christians wait for him.

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#20 Jun 12, 2013
little lamb wrote:
No Christian would be involved in politics
politics comes from the word 'polis' city..and Christians are taught in Hebrews ..that ' we do not have a city here that continues, but earnestly seek the one to come'
Satan offered Jesus all the kingdoms of the world , if he would do an act of worship to him.
He told Jesus , they had been delivered to him, and he can give them to whom he likes.
Jesus is returning with the legal right to rule the nations...Christians wait for him.
LOL - that's ridiculous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity_and...

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