Saint of the Day thread
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MichelleMC

AOL

#1 May 24, 2010
Hi,
I figured we need a positive thread. If anyone can come up with the saint of each day or the feast day of each day, please post it. Even if there are more than one saint. I get my saint of the day through emails. Anyway, I will start with today's saint in the next post.
MichelleMC

AOL

#2 May 24, 2010
May 24, 2010

St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi
(1566-1607)

Mystical ecstasy is the elevation of the spirit to God in such a way that the person is aware of this union with God and both internal and external senses are detached from the sensible world. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi was so generously given this special gift of God that she is called the "ecstatic saint."
She was born into a noble family in Florence in 1566. The normal course would have been for Catherine de Pazzi to have married wealth and enjoyed comfort, but she chose to follow her own path. At nine she learned to meditate from the family confessor. She made her first Communion at the then-early age of 10 and made a vow of virginity one month later. When 16, she entered the Carmelite convent in Florence because she could receive Communion daily there.

Catherine had taken the name Mary Magdalene and had been a novice for a year when she became critically ill. Death seemed near so her superiors let her make her profession of vows from a cot in the chapel in a private ceremony. Immediately after, she fell into an ecstasy that lasted about two hours. This was repeated after Communion on the following 40 mornings. These ecstasies were rich experiences of union with God and contained marvelous insights into divine truths.

As a safeguard against deception and to preserve the revelations, her confessor asked Mary Magdalene to dictate her experiences to sister secretaries. Over the next six years, five large volumes were filled. The first three books record ecstasies from May of 1584 through Pentecost week the following year. This week was a preparation for a severe five-year trial. The fourth book records that trial and the fifth is a collection of letters concerning reform and renewal. Another book, Admonitions, is a collection of her sayings arising from her experiences in the formation of women religious.

The extraordinary was ordinary for this saint. She read the thoughts of others and predicted future events. During her lifetime, she appeared to several persons in distant places and cured a number of sick people.

It would be easy to dwell on the ecstasies and pretend that Mary Magdalene only had spiritual highs. This is far from true. It seems that God permitted her this special closeness to prepare her for the five years of desolation that followed when she experienced spiritual dryness. She was plunged into a state of darkness in which she saw nothing but what was horrible in herself and all around her. She had violent temptations and endured great physical suffering. She died in 1607 at 41, and was canonized in 1669.

Comment:

Intimate union, God's gift to mystics, is a reminder to all of us of the eternal happiness of union he wishes to give us. The cause of mystical ecstasy in this life is the Holy Spirit, working through spiritual gifts. The ecstasy occurs because of the weakness of the body and its powers to withstand the divine illumination, but as the body is purified and strengthened, ecstasy no longer occurs. On various aspects of ecstasy, see Teresa of Avila, Interior Castle, Chapter 5, and John of the Cross, Dark Night of the Soul, 2:1-2.

Quote:
There are many people today who see no purpose in suffering. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi discovered saving grace in suffering. When she entered religious life she was filled with a desire to suffer for Christ during the rest of her life. The more she suffered, the greater grew her desire for it. Her dying words to her fellow sisters were: "The last thing I ask of you—and I ask it in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ—is that you love him alone, that you trust implicitly in him and that you encourage one another continually to suffer for the love of him."
MichelleMC

AOL

#4 May 25, 2010
May 25, 2010

St. Bede the Venerable
(672?-735)

Bede is one of the few saints honored as such even during his lifetime. His writings were filled with such faith and learning that even while he was still alive, a Church council ordered them to be read publicly in the churches.
At an early age Bede was entrusted to the care of the abbot of the Monastery of St. Paul, Jarrow. The happy combination of genius and the instruction of scholarly, saintly monks produced a saint and an extraordinary scholar, perhaps the most outstanding one of his day. He was deeply versed in all the sciences of his times: natural philosophy, the philosophical principles of Aristotle, astronomy, arithmetic, grammar, ecclesiastical history, the lives of the saints and, especially, Holy Scripture. From the time of his ordination to the priesthood at 30 (he had been ordained deacon at 19) till his death, he was ever occupied with learning, writing and teaching. Besides the many books that he copied, he composed 45 of his own, including 30 commentaries on books of the Bible.

Although eagerly sought by kings and other notables, even Pope Sergius, Bede managed to remain in his own monastery till his death. Only once did he leave for a few months in order to teach in the school of the archbishop of York. Bede died in 735 praying his favorite prayer:“Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As in the beginning, so now, and forever.”

His Ecclesiastical History of the English People is commonly regarded as of decisive importance in the art and science of writing history. A golden age was coming to an end at the time of Bede’s death: It had fulfilled its purpose of preparing Western Christianity to assimilate the non-Roman barbarian North. Bede recognized the opening to a new day in the life of the Church even as it was happening.

Comment:

Though his History is the greatest legacy Bede has left us, his work in all the sciences (especially in Scripture) should not be overlooked. During his last Lent, he worked on a translation of the Gospel of St. John into English, completing it the day he died. But of this work “to break the word to the poor and unlearned” nothing remains today.

Quote:
“We have not, it seems to me, amid all our discoveries, invented as yet anything better than the Christian life which Bede lived, and the Christian death which he died”(C. Plummer, editor of Bede’s Ecclesiastical History).


Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#5 May 25, 2010
I think this is what we need! Thankyou Michelle!
Cruzader99

Alpharetta, GA

#6 May 25, 2010
Thanks Michelle! This is another great idea of yours!
MichelleMC

Jacksonville, NC

#7 May 25, 2010
You're welcome Cruzader and alwayschooselife.
Cruzader99

Alpharetta, GA

#8 May 25, 2010
MichelleMC wrote:
You're welcome Cruzader and alwayschooselife.
Michelle, this is your thread but I thought it might be cool to see if we can find some quotes or special stories about the Saint of the Day. Is that okay with you or did you want to keep it confined to just a short essay on the Saint?
Franck

United States

#9 May 25, 2010
Thanks Michelle! We all appreciate it.
MichelleMC

AOL

#10 May 25, 2010
Cruzader99 wrote:
<quoted text>
Michelle, this is your thread but I thought it might be cool to see if we can find some quotes or special stories about the Saint of the Day. Is that okay with you or did you want to keep it confined to just a short essay on the Saint?
That's a great idea Cruz. I'm all for it .
MichelleMC

AOL

#11 May 25, 2010
Franck wrote:
Thanks Michelle! We all appreciate it.
You're welcome Franck.
MichelleMC

AOL

#12 May 25, 2010
Cruzader99 wrote:
<quoted text>
Michelle, this is your thread but I thought it might be cool to see if we can find some quotes or special stories about the Saint of the Day. Is that okay with you or did you want to keep it confined to just a short essay on the Saint?
Like I said in my first post, there are many days that we honor more than one saint, so that would be great. I just paste the ones from my emails, but perhaps there's other saints in the same day.
RCC Truth Squad

Granger, IN

#13 May 25, 2010
WHAT....no hate or venom from Satanist, athiests and Protestants?! I don't know what to think! Battling those folks (with charity, I hope) on these threads gets a little tedious. You are my refreshment...a ray of light.

God Love you, Michelle. Keep up the good work.
MichelleMC

AOL

#14 May 25, 2010
RCC Truth Squad wrote:
WHAT....no hate or venom from Satanist, athiests and Protestants?! I don't know what to think! Battling those folks (with charity, I hope) on these threads gets a little tedious. You are my refreshment...a ray of light.
God Love you, Michelle. Keep up the good work.
Thank you, RCC and you are a refreshment too. I wouldn't get too comfortable with nobody coming in and putting their two cents in. I'm sure someone will show up. They've always have in any thread. You keep up the good work as well.
MichelleMC

AOL

#15 May 26, 2010
May 26, 2010

St. Philip Neri
(1515-1595)

Philip Neri was a sign of contradiction, combining popularity with piety against the background of a corrupt Rome and a disinterested clergy, the whole post-Renaissance malaise.
At an early age, he abandoned the chance to become a businessman, moved to Rome from Florence and devoted his life and individuality to God. After three years of philosophy and theology studies, he gave up any thought of ordination. The next 13 years were spent in a vocation unusual at the time—that of a layperson actively engaged in prayer and the apostolate.

As the Council of Trent was reforming the Church on a doctrinal level, Philip’s appealing personality was winning him friends from all levels of society, from beggars to cardinals. He rapidly gathered around himself a group of laypersons won over by his audacious spirituality. Initially they met as an informal prayer and discussion group, and also served poor people in Rome.

At the urging of his confessor, he was ordained priest and soon became an outstanding confessor, gifted with the knack of piercing the pretenses and illusions of others, though always in a charitable manner and often with a joke. He arranged talks, discussions and prayers for his penitents in a room above the church. He sometimes led “excursions” to other churches, often with music and a picnic on the way.

Some of his followers became priests and lived together in community. This was the beginning of the Oratory, the religious institute he founded. A feature of their life was a daily afternoon service of four informal talks, with vernacular hymns and prayers. Giovanni Palestrina was one of Philip’s followers, and composed music for the services.

The Oratory was finally approved after suffering through a period of accusations of being an assembly of heretics, where laypersons preached and sang vernacular hymns!(Cardinal Newman founded the first English-speaking house of the Oratory.)

Philip’s advice was sought by many of the prominent figures of his day. He is one of the influential figures of the Counter-Reformation, mainly for converting to personal holiness many of the influential people within the Church itself. His characteristic virtues were humility and gaiety.

Comment:

Many people wrongly feel that such an attractive and jocular personality as Philip’s cannot be combined with an intense spirituality. Philip’s life melts our rigid, narrow views of piety. His approach to sanctity was truly catholic, all-embracing and accompanied by a good laugh. Philip always wanted his followers to become not less but more human through their striving for holiness.

Quote:
Philip Neri prayed, "Let me get through today, and I shall not fear tomorrow."
MichelleMC

AOL

#16 May 26, 2010
Cruzader99 wrote:
<quoted text>
Michelle, this is your thread but I thought it might be cool to see if we can find some quotes or special stories about the Saint of the Day. Is that okay with you or did you want to keep it confined to just a short essay on the Saint?
Cruz and all,
If anyone wants to comment on the saints of the day to say how they inspire you, and just post about it, that's fine too. Alwayschooselife did that in another thread about a saint. We could do that here.
MichelleMC

AOL

#17 May 26, 2010
I heard that one time St. Philip Neri said Mass and someone snuck out right after Communion and that he sent the altar boys with lit candles to walk besides the person because Jesus was still physically present in the person, as the 15 minutes was nowhere near up.
Luke

Atlanta, GA

#18 May 26, 2010
MichelleMC wrote:
<quoted text>
Cruz and all,
If anyone wants to comment on the saints of the day to say how they inspire you, and just post about it, that's fine too. Alwayschooselife did that in another thread about a saint. We could do that here.
Hey Michelle. Thanks for starting this thread. I'll be happy to pitch in when possible.
Luke

Atlanta, GA

#19 May 26, 2010
A joyful heart is more easily made perfect than one that is cast down.

--Saint Philip Neri
MichelleMC

AOL

#20 May 26, 2010
Luke wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey Michelle. Thanks for starting this thread. I'll be happy to pitch in when possible.
You're welcome Luke, and thank you as well.
MichelleMC

AOL

#22 May 26, 2010
Most are walking dead wrote:
<quoted text>
What a great saint.
We are all called to be saints, but how hard it is to even not have venial sins!
Thanks Michelle for starting this positive thread. Let's pray it remains "clean".
Very true MAWD. It is very hard to be a saint. You're welcome for this thread. I hope it remains positive as well.
Anybody here is welcome to post about the saint of the day, especially if I post about one and there's another saint the Church is honoring on the same day as well.

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