Follow the Examples of the Buddha

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Joseph Htoomyat Thu

Hlaing, Myanmar

#1 Nov 25, 2012
The following story was extracted from the book "How to live without fear and worry (II)" by Dr. K Sri Dhammananda, a Sri Lankan Theravada Buddhist monk.

----------

Follow the Buddha's examples.

On one occasion the Buddha was invited by a brahmin for alms to his house. As invited, the Buddha visited the house of the brahmin. Instead of entertaining Him, the brahmin poured forth a torrent of abuse with the filthiest of words.

The Buddha politely inquired:-

"Do visitors come to your house, good brahmin?"
"Yes", He replied.

Buddha: "What do you do when they come?"
Brahmin: "Oh, we prepare a sumptuous feast."

Buddha: "If they fail to turn up?"
Brahmin: "Why, we gladly partake of it."

Buddha: "Well, good brahmin, you have invited me for alms and
entertained me with abuse which I decline to accept. Please take it back.

The Buddha did not retaliate, but politely gave back what the Brahmin had given Him. Retaliate not, the Buddha advised. "Hatreds do not cease through hatred, but through love alone they cease."

There was no religious teacher so highly praised and so severely criticized, reviled and blamed like the Buddha. Such is the fate of great men.

In a public assembly a vile woman named Cinca, pretending to be pregnant, accused the Buddha. With a smiling face the Buddha patiently endured the insult and thereby His innocence was proved.

The Buddha was once accused of murdering a woman assisted by His disciples. Non-Buddhists severely criticized the Buddha and His disciples to such an extent that the Venerable Ananda appealed to the Buddha to leave for another village.

Buddha: "How, Ananda, what if those other villagers also abuse us?"

Ananda: "Well then, Lord we will proceed to another village."

Buddha: "Then Ananda, the whole of India will have no place for us. Be patient. These unfounded abuses will automatically cease."

Magandiya, a lady of harem who hated the Buddha for speaking about the repulsiveness of her attractive figure when her father, through ignorance, wished to give her in marriage to the Buddha. She hired drunkards to insult the Buddha in public. With perfect equanimity the Buddha endured the insult. But Magandiya had to suffer for her misdeed.
Hilite

Santa Ana, CA

#2 Nov 26, 2012
Let's not just read one passage at the same time leave out other passages and come to the wrong conclusion:

Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Maha Thera

"One day, Sinha, the general of the army, went to the Buddha and said,'I am a soldier, O Blessed One. I am appointed by the King to enforce his laws and to wage his wars. The Buddha teaches infinite love, kindness and compassion for all sufferers: Does the Buddha permit the punishment of the criminal? And also, does the Buddha declare that it is wrong to go to war for the protection of our homes, our wives, our children and our property? Does the Buddha teach the doctrine of complete self-surrender? Should I suffer the evil-doer to do with what he pleases and yield submissively to him who threatens to take by violence what is my own? Does the Buddha maintain that all strife including warfare waged for a righteous cause should be forbidden?'

The Buddha replied,'He who deserves punishment must be punished. And he who is worthy of favor must be favored. Do not do injury to any living being but be just, filled with love and kindness.' These injunctions are not contradictory because the person who is punished for his crimes will suffer his injury not through the ill-will of the judge but through the evil act itself. His own acts have brought upon him the injury that the executors of the law inflict. When a magistrate punishes, he must not harbor hatred in his heart. When a murderer is put to death, he should realize that his punishment is the result of his own act. With his understanding, he will no longer lament his fate but can console his mind. And the Blessed One continued,'The Buddha teaches that all warfare in which man tries to slay his brothers is lamentable. But he does not teach that those who are involved in war to maintain peace and order, after having exhausted all means to avoid conflict, are blameworthy.

'Struggle must exist, for all life is a struggle of some kind. But make certain that you do not struggle in the interest of self against truth and justice. He who struggles out of self-interest to make himself great or powerful or rich or famous, will have no reward. But he who struggles for peace and truth will have great reward; even his defeat will be deemed a victory."
Hilite

Los Angeles, CA

#3 Nov 26, 2012
One thing we should keep in mind is that certain examples are not meant to be applied to to all situations. Every situation has an appropriate approach for that particular situation as the above two passages from Sri Dhammananda shown. Just reading the first passage, some people can jump to a false conclusion that he is suggesting that people should not do what they can to protect their homes, wives , and children when under attack. However, he had also touch on this particular situation and we can clearly see that is not the case. To apply a teaching meant for one situation onto all other situation is misleading.

It is good to keep in mind that another equally important( if not more so) aspect of the Buddha's teaching is discernment rather than blindly applying one approach to all scenarios .

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#4 Nov 27, 2012
please copy from the sutta.mere play of non-scriptural words may misrepresent the Buddha's original teaching.
Hello

Flushing, NY

#5 Nov 27, 2012
Here is an excellent article from Access to Insight:
The question of political, defensive violence, however, must be mentioned here. Can violence be justified in a situation where the state needs to defend its citizens against external and internal threats? Is this a situation in which violence is not condemned? The texts suggest Buddhism would here insist on discrimination. The Cakkavatti Sihanada Sutta gives this advice to the righteous king:
This, dear son, that you, leaning on the Dhamma, honoring, respecting and revering it, doing homage to it, hallowing it, being yourself a Dhamma-banner, a Dhamma-signal, having the Dhamma as your master, should provide the right watch, ward and protection for your own folk, for the army, for the nobles, for vassals and brahmans and householders, for town and country dwellers, for the religious world and for beasts and birds.[40]
This passage implies that the need for an army and consequently for the use of force in defense is accepted as a worldly necessity. But the picture which emerges is not glorification of the "just" war but an appeal for war and violence to be seen against a higher set of values.
Relevant perspectives on these political realities are seen in the Buddha's advice to the Vajjians and to King Pasenadi. The Vajjians are faced with vicious aggression from King Ajatasattu, King of Magadha, who is bent on destroying them. The latter sends a brahman to the Buddha for advice and a prediction about how successful he will be in war. The very fact that he does so shows that he does not consider the Buddha either ill-informed or dismissive of such political conflicts. The reply he receives is significant. The Buddha does not refer directly to Ajatasattu but implies that the use of arms against a people who are morally pure and in concord would be fruitless. His words to Ajatasattu become words of advice to the Vajjians that they should meet together in concord and give respect to their elders, their ancient institutions, their traditions and their women. No mention is made of the Vajjian military strength; only of their moral strength. Moral strength is held up as defense against violence. Yet it is not denied but implicitly understood that the Vajjians would have to use force to repulse aggression, and also present is an implicit condemnation of Ajatasattu's intentions.[41]
Hello

Flushing, NY

#6 Nov 27, 2012
Cont'd

King Pasenadi is also seen in conflict with Ajatasattu, meeting force with force. At first, Ajatasattu is the aggressor and the victor. The reported response of the Buddha is significant:
Monks, the King of Magadha, Ajatasattu, son of the Vedehi Princess, is a friend to, an intimate of, mixed up with, whatever is evil. The Kosalan King Pasenadi is a friend to, an intimate of, mixed up with, whatever is good.[42]
Thus Pasenadi's role as defender of the nation against aggression is accepted as necessary and praiseworthy. In the next battle, Pasenadi is the victor. Ajatasattu's army is confiscated but Pasenadi is merciful enough to grant Ajatasattu his life. It is still Ajatasattu who is condemned. His fate is seen in kammic terms:
A man may spoil another just so far
As it may serve his ends, but when he's spoiled
By others he, despoiled, spoils yet again.
So long as evil's fruit is not matured
The fool does fancy: "Now's the hour, the chance!"
But when the deed bears fruit, he fareth ill.
The slayer gets a slayer in his turn,
The conqueror gets one who conquers him,
The abuser wins abuse, the annoyer frets:
Thus by the evolution of the deed
A man who spoils is spoiled in his turn.[43]
In one respect, Pasenadi becomes an instrument of kamma for Ajatasattu. At another level, acceptance of political realities emerges. The king has a duty to protect his citizens from external threats of violence. Therefore, the advice given to a king or those with responsibility for government about reacting to the violence of others is fitted to the situation, a situation in which the use of violence may become a political necessity in a world governed by craving (tanha). Yet, even with affairs of state, war is placed in the perspective of a more important set of values. To Pasenadi, burdened by responsibility, the Buddha says:
Noble and brahman, commoner and serf,
None can evade and play the truant here:
The impending doom overwhelms one and all.
Here is no place for strife with elephants
Or chariots of war or infantry,
Nay, nor for war or woven spell or curse
Nor may finance avail to win the day.[44]
War is not presented as worthy of praise in itself. It is recognized that battle cannot take place without hatred and the wish to kill, in both the mind of aggressor and victim. A Samyutta Nikaya passage illustrates this. A fighting man comes to the Buddha and explains his belief that the warrior who is killed whilst fighting energetically in battle is reborn in the company of the Devas of Passionate Delight. The Buddha's answer condemns this idea as perverted. A warrior is always led by the idea, "Let those beings be exterminated so that they may be never thought to have existed."[45] Such a view can only lead downwards rather than to any heavenly world. The Buddha thus rejects any glorification of war, since there can be no glory when the mind is dominated by hate.
Hello

Flushing, NY

#7 Nov 27, 2012
Here is the link to the article:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/ha...
Hello

Flushing, NY

#8 Nov 27, 2012
Whoops, here is the first part:

The question of political, defensive violence, however, must be mentioned here. Can violence be justified in a situation where the state needs to defend its citizens against external and internal threats? Is this a situation in which violence is not condemned? The texts suggest Buddhism would here insist on discrimination. The Cakkavatti Sihanada Sutta gives this advice to the righteous king:

This, dear son, that you, leaning on the Dhamma, honoring, respecting and revering it, doing homage to it, hallowing it, being yourself a Dhamma-banner, a Dhamma-signal, having the Dhamma as your master, should provide the right watch, ward and protection for your own folk, for the army, for the nobles, for vassals and brahmans and householders, for town and country dwellers, for the religious world and for beasts and birds.[40]
This passage implies that the need for an army and consequently for the use of force in defense is accepted as a worldly necessity. But the picture which emerges is not glorification of the "just" war but an appeal for war and violence to be seen against a higher set of values.

Relevant perspectives on these political realities are seen in the Buddha's advice to the Vajjians and to King Pasenadi. The Vajjians are faced with vicious aggression from King Ajatasattu, King of Magadha, who is bent on destroying them. The latter sends a brahman to the Buddha for advice and a prediction about how successful he will be in war. The very fact that he does so shows that he does not consider the Buddha either ill-informed or dismissive of such political conflicts. The reply he receives is significant. The Buddha does not refer directly to Ajatasattu but implies that the use of arms against a people who are morally pure and in concord would be fruitless. His words to Ajatasattu become words of advice to the Vajjians that they should meet together in concord and give respect to their elders, their ancient institutions, their traditions and their women. No mention is made of the Vajjian military strength; only of their moral strength. Moral strength is held up as defense against violence. Yet it is not denied but implicitly understood that the Vajjians would have to use force to repulse aggression, and also present is an implicit condemnation of Ajatasattu's intentions.[41]

King Pasenadi is also seen in conflict with Ajatasattu, meeting force with force. At first, Ajatasattu is the aggressor and the victor. The reported response of the Buddha is significant:

Monks, the King of Magadha, Ajatasattu, son of the Vedehi Princess, is a friend to, an intimate of, mixed up with, whatever is evil. The Kosalan King Pasenadi is a friend to, an intimate of, mixed up with, whatever is good.[42]

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#9 Nov 27, 2012
Hello wrote:
Cont'd
King Pasenadi is also seen in conflict with Ajatasattu, meeting force with force....
*
*
* The Buddha thus rejects any glorification of war, since there can be no glory when the mind is dominated by hate.
:)
DDR

Oceanside, CA

#10 Nov 28, 2012
sampuna wrote:
please copy from the sutta.mere play of non-scriptural words may misrepresent the Buddha's original teaching.
You need to do your homework, the incident that Ven Dhammananda retold about General Siha asked the Buddha the question was in the text. If you have read the texts you would have recognize that event from the text. It's odd that you are still asking people to copy from the sutta after it was pointed out for you. Why don't you go back and read the texts before trying to lecture and tell people what to do.
DDR

Oceanside, CA

#11 Nov 28, 2012
sampuna wrote:
<quoted text>
:)
I don't think anyone is glorifying war here. But it is not eliminated as an option if necessary. There is a difference . The Buddha does not forbid Buddhist kings from going to war or protect innocent people in the kingdom.
DDR

Oceanside, CA

#12 Nov 28, 2012
If you don't believe what was posted above regarding general Siha and his question was in the text then go read it yourself. If after reading you still have a problem then come back and let us know. But don't start accusing when you have not read it or know anything about it.

This is what happens when people who have not study the teaching and yet try to become a teacher or scold others ( not to mention even scolding monks as well).
Hello

Flushing, NY

#13 Nov 28, 2012
sampuna wrote:
<quoted text>
:)
Are we saying like Muslims that you will get virgins in heaven for war against the unbeliever?

No. Buddha supported King Pasanedi in his decision to defeat Ajatshatru, whose evil nature matches Muslims.

Buddhists are given full right to defend the precious and rare human birth, with the even more precious lives of Dharma practitioners.

No second thoughts. Anyone attacks Buddhists or Buddhist institutions, Buddhists should protect themselves to the fullest extent!

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#14 Dec 5, 2012
Hello wrote:
<quoted text>
No second thoughts. Anyone attacks Buddhists or Buddhist institutions, Buddhists should protect themselves to the fullest extent!
you're saying like there's a war going on here, when there is not.

the ways of the world is such : everyone seeks victory. Yet our Lord, the Maha karuna Buddha warns ~

"VICTORY BREED HATRED"

beware.

Our Lord prefers peace : "NOT IN HATE THAT HATE CEASES, BUT ONLY IN LOVE"

You choose your path. Our Lord is SUPREME, surpasses all in virtues. If you choose puthujanic ways to live, please do not label it as Buddhism.

The Dhamma is SUPREME.
Prez

Whittier, CA

#15 Dec 6, 2012
Don't you know that Muslims waging war secretly without daring to declare war. They will fund terrorist to bomb and attack innocent civilians in a certain country then hide among their civilians instead of army base. This way when the other attack back they will accuse them of war crimes and expect to hide safely among Muslims civilians. They also launch rape jihad, propaganda war, forced conversion, riots , demanding self rule, Islamization , ransacking villages, chase people out of their land by attack and murder to scare them away from their town, infiltration of government , black mailing politicians and media. The havoc a they cause on the countries they infiltrated are endless.

Only fools would think that there is a war going on when the other side declare a war. They quietly attack while innocent people are asleep . This doesn't just refer to arm attack, but in various ways. For example, they will form a " human right " group to push their agenda in the name of social activism . For example, trying to remove cross in public places or forbidding people from wearing a cross at work in Christian countries. The attack is not just through terrorism or warfare, but by ordinary Muslims living in your society as well. Before you know it, Islamization or the country, society and culture .

You're not in the position to lecture on love and compassion when you obviously harbor hatred toward the Buddhist monastic. And stop taking the teaching out of context and applying it in the wrong scenarios or leaving out other parts regarding self defense and protection of innocent people.

What is wrong with" Buddhists should protect themselves to the fullest extent!"

Why are you forbidding people when the Buddha does not forbid people from protecting others or practice self defense.
Prez

Whittier, CA

#16 Dec 6, 2012
Another tac tic in which they wage war without declaring war is causing disharmony within the countries which they infiltrated. Thereby weakening the country from the inside. Eventually they will hijack one side in the conflict and have their way once that side won.

They also try to take over little by little , piece by piece if they can't take over the whole land. For example, they just took over a piece of Isreal from within. In India they took over a part of it before, and now they want more ( Jammu and Kashmir). They will push for control piece by piece from within the host country until eventually the whole thing become islamized and people of other religion hardly have any rights at all. By then they would discriminate against people of other religion and charge them extra money and give them a blow in the neck while accepting the money to punish people for not being a Muslim .

A silent jihad have going launched while innocent people are sleeping .
Prez

Whittier, CA

#17 Dec 6, 2012
Correction " have been going on and have been launched"
Hello

Flushing, NY

#18 Dec 6, 2012
sampuna wrote:
<quoted text>
you're saying like there's a war going on here, when there is not.
the ways of the world is such : everyone seeks victory. Yet our Lord, the Maha karuna Buddha warns ~
"VICTORY BREED HATRED"
beware.
Our Lord prefers peace : "NOT IN HATE THAT HATE CEASES, BUT ONLY IN LOVE"
You choose your path. Our Lord is SUPREME, surpasses all in virtues. If you choose puthujanic ways to live, please do not label it as Buddhism.
The Dhamma is SUPREME.
Don't commit the sin of calling an Arya a putthujana.

You lack basic understanding of Buddhism. An Arya is free of creating Karma and knows how to create merit.

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#19 Dec 6, 2012
Hello wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't commit the sin of calling an Arya a putthujana.
You lack basic understanding of Buddhism. An Arya is free of creating Karma and knows how to create merit.
An ariya penetrates the Ariya Sacca, thoroughly understanding it, is always unperturbed.

Dukkha,

Samudaya,

Nirodha,

Magga.

With so much anti non-Buddhists ideas you've got,I'm amazed by your declaration.
Hello

Flushing, NY

#20 Dec 6, 2012
sampuna wrote:
<quoted text>
An ariya penetrates the Ariya Sacca, thoroughly understanding it, is always unperturbed.
Dukkha,
Samudaya,
Nirodha,
Magga.
With so much anti non-Buddhists ideas you've got,I'm amazed by your declaration.
A monkey aka puthujana as yourself would be amazed. Full of lies the monkey is full of woes.

Don't question the Sri Lankans or Burmese monks they are far wiser.

When you make Malasia Buddhist majority, we will know you are no longer a monkey.

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