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Brooklyn, NY

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#1
Dec 28, 2010
 
I read the following and was like, WOW!

I love the Buddha's Dhammakaya, how beautiful it is! no wonder it is called beautiful in the beginning, beautiful in the middle and beautiful in the end!

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The Ten Grave Precepts are from the Sutra of Brahma's Net (梵網& #32147;, Brahmajāla). The Ten Grave Precepts along with the 48 secondary precepts are called the Mahayana perfect immediate precepts (大乘& #22291;頓&#25106 ;) because they offer a direct possibility of immediately becoming a Buddha to the one who is able to realize them completely.

1-Affirm life; Do not kill
2-Be giving; Do not steal
3-Honor the body; Do not misuse sexuality
4-Manifest truth; Do not lie
5-Proceed clearly; Do not cloud the mind
6-See the perfection; Do not speak of others' errors and faults
7-Realize self and other as one; Do not elevate the self and blame others
8-Give generously; Do not be withholding
9-Actualize harmony; Do not be angry
10-Experience the intimacy of things; Do not defile the Three Treasures

-----

Truly I want to memorize this and try to practice everyday!!!
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#2
Dec 28, 2010
 
The affirmative is found in the Brahmajala Sutra of the Mahayana:

1. First Major Precept

On Killing
A disciple of the Buddha shall not himself kill, encourage others to kill, kill by expedient means, praise killing, rejoice at witnessing killing, or kill through incantation or deviant mantras. He must not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of killing, and shall not intentionally kill any living creature.(24)

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to nurture a mind of compassion and filial piety, always devising expedient means to rescue and protect all beings. If instead, he fails to restrain himself and kills sentient beings without mercy, he commits a Parajika (major) offense.(25)

2. Second Major Precept

On Stealing
A disciple of the Buddha must not himself steal or encourage others to steal, steal by expedient means, steal by means of incantation or deviant mantras. He should not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of stealing. No valuables or possessions, even those belonging to ghosts and spirits or thieves and robbers, be they as small as a needle or blade of grass, may be stolen.

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to have a mind of mercy, compassion, and filial piety -- always helping people earn merits and achieve happiness. If instead, he steals the possessions of others, he commits a Parajika offense.(26)

3. Third Major Precept

On Sexual Misconduct
A disciple of the Buddha must not engage in licentious acts or encourage others to do so.[As a monk] he should not have sexual relations with any female -- be she a human, animal, deity or spirit -- nor create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of such misconduct. Indeed, he must not engage in improper sexual conduct with anyone.(27)

A Buddha's disciple ought to have a mind of filial piety -- rescuing all sentient beings and instructing them in the Dharma of purity and chastity. If instead, he lacks compassion and encourages others to engage in sexual relations promiscuously, including with animals and even their mothers, daughters, sisters, or other close relatives, he commits a Parajika offense.(28)

4. Fourth Major Precept

On Lying and False Speech
A disciple of the Buddha must not himself use false words and speech, or encourage others to lie or lie by expedient means. He should not involve himself in the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of lying, saying that he has seen what he has not seen or vice-versa, or lying implicitly through physical or mental means.(29)

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to maintain Right Speech and Right Views always, and lead all others to maintain them as well. If instead, he causes wrong speech, wrong views or evil karma in others, he commits a Parajika offense.

5. Fifth Major Precept

On Selling Alcoholic Beverages
A disciple of the Buddha must not trade in alcoholic beverages or encourage others to do so. He should not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of selling any intoxicant whatsoever, for intoxicants are the causes and conditions of all kinds of offenses.

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to help all sentient beings achieve clear wisdom. If instead, he causes them to have upside-down, topsy-turvy thinking, he commits a Parajika offense.(30)
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#3
Dec 28, 2010
 
6. Sixth Major Precept

On Broadcasting the Faults of the Assembly
A disciple of the Buddha must not himself broadcast the misdeeds or infractions of Bodhisattva-clerics or Bodhisattva-laypersons, or of [ordinary] monks and nuns -- nor encourage others to do so. He must not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of discussing the offenses of the assembly.

As a Buddha's disciple, whenever he hears evil persons, externalists or followers of the Two Vehicles speak of practices contrary to the Dharma or contrary to the precepts within the Buddhist community, he should instruct them with a compassionate mind and lead them to develop wholesome faith in the Mahayana.

If instead, he discusses the faults and misdeeds that occur within the assembly, he commits a Parajika offense.(31)

7. Seventh Major Precept

On Praising Oneself and Disparaging Others
A disciple of the Buddha shall not praise himself and speak ill of others, or encourage others to do so. He must not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of praising himself and disparaging others.

As a disciple of the Buddha, he should be willing to stand in for all sentient beings and endure humiliation and slander -- accepting blame and letting sentient beings have all the glory. If instead, he displays his own virtues and conceals the good points of others, thus causing them to suffer slander, he commits a Parajika offense.(32)

8. Eighth Major Precept

On Stinginess and Abuse
A disciple of the Buddha must not be stingy or encourage others to be stingy. He should not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of stinginess. As a Bodhisattva, whenever a destitute person comes for help, he should give that person what he needs. If instead, out of anger and resentment,(33) he denies all assistance -- refusing to help with even a penny, a needle, a blade of grass, even a single sentence or verse or a phrase of Dharma, but instead scolds and abuses that person -- he commits a Parajika offense.

9. Ninth Major Precept

On Anger and Resentment
A disciple of the Buddha shall not harbor anger or encourage others to be angry. He should not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of anger.

As a disciple of the Buddha, he ought to be compassionate and filial, helping all sentient beings develop the good roots of non-contention. If instead, he insults and abuses sentient beings, or even transformation beings [such as deities and spirits], with harsh words, hitting them with his fists or feet, or attacking them with a knife or club -- or harbors grudges even when the victim confesses his mistakes and humbly seeks forgiveness in a soft, conciliatory voice -- the disciple commits a Parajika offense.(34)

10. Tenth Major Precept

On Slandering the Triple Jewel
A Buddha's disciple shall not himself speak ill of the Triple Jewel or encourage others to do so. He must not create the causes, conditions, methods or karma of slander. If a disciple hears but a single word of slander against the Buddha from externalists or evil beings, he experiences a pain similar to that of three hundred spears piercing his heart. How then could he possibly slander the Triple Jewel himself?

Hence, if a disciple lacks faith and filial piety towards the Triple Jewel, and even assists evil persons or those of aberrant views to slander the Triple Jewel, he commits a Parajika offense.(35)
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#4
Dec 28, 2010
 
1. First Major Precept

On Killing
A disciple of the Buddha shall not himself kill, encourage others to kill, kill by expedient means, praise killing, rejoice at witnessing killing, or kill through incantation or deviant mantras. He must not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of killing, and shall not intentionally kill any living creature.(24)

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to nurture a mind of compassion and filial piety, always devising expedient means to rescue and protect all beings. If instead, he fails to restrain himself and kills sentient beings without mercy, he commits a Parajika (major) offense.(25)

2. Second Major Precept

On Stealing
A disciple of the Buddha must not himself steal or encourage others to steal, steal by expedient means, steal by means of incantation or deviant mantras. He should not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of stealing. No valuables or possessions, even those belonging to ghosts and spirits or thieves and robbers, be they as small as a needle or blade of grass, may be stolen.

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to have a mind of mercy, compassion, and filial piety -- always helping people earn merits and achieve happiness. If instead, he steals the possessions of others, he commits a Parajika offense.(26)

3. Third Major Precept

On Sexual Misconduct
A disciple of the Buddha must not engage in licentious acts or encourage others to do so.[As a monk] he should not have sexual relations with any female -- be she a human, animal, deity or spirit -- nor create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of such misconduct. Indeed, he must not engage in improper sexual conduct with anyone.(27)

A Buddha's disciple ought to have a mind of filial piety -- rescuing all sentient beings and instructing them in the Dharma of purity and chastity. If instead, he lacks compassion and encourages others to engage in sexual relations promiscuously, including with animals and even their mothers, daughters, sisters, or other close relatives, he commits a Parajika offense.(28)

4. Fourth Major Precept

On Lying and False Speech
A disciple of the Buddha must not himself use false words and speech, or encourage others to lie or lie by expedient means. He should not involve himself in the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of lying, saying that he has seen what he has not seen or vice-versa, or lying implicitly through physical or mental means.(29)

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to maintain Right Speech and Right Views always, and lead all others to maintain them as well. If instead, he causes wrong speech, wrong views or evil karma in others, he commits a Parajika offense.

5. Fifth Major Precept

On Selling Alcoholic Beverages
A disciple of the Buddha must not trade in alcoholic beverages or encourage others to do so. He should not create the causes, conditions, methods, or karma of selling any intoxicant whatsoever, for intoxicants are the causes and conditions of all kinds of offenses.

As a Buddha's disciple, he ought to help all sentient beings achieve clear wisdom. If instead, he causes them to have upside-down, topsy-turvy thinking, he commits a Parajika offense.(30)
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#5
Jan 9, 2011
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Another beautiful way Lord Buddha taught the precepts--as a gift to all beings! So a Buddhist gives these unfailing, long standing gifts everyday when they meditate.

1) give the gift of life by restraining from taking life through anger, greed and hatred.

2) give gifts and share - refrain from taking what is not given.

3)Give the gift of honoring your body and that of others through restraining lust, refrain from sexual misconduct arising from lust and greed.

4) give the gift of truth, refrain from lying.

5) give the gift of mental clarity, refrain from taking drugs, alcohol which destroy mental clarity.

When a Buddhist gives these gifts, in turn they receive the gift of fearlessness and long life for the precepts bestow freedom from fear for all creatures and life for all creatures.
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#6
Jan 16, 2011
 
Those who keep and be mindful of these wonderful precepts, 5 blessings accrue with the 5 precepts!

Five blessings
"Five blessings, householders, accrue to the righteous person through his practice of virtue:

1)great increase of wealth through his diligence;
2) a favorable reputation;
3) a confident deportment, without timidity, in every society, be it that of nobles, brahmans, householders, or ascetics;
4)a serene death;
5) and, at the breaking up of the body after death, rebirth in a happy state, in a heavenly world."

— DN 16
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#7
Jan 17, 2011
 
The Precepts are also a sacrifice!

From the Kutadanta sutta:

"But, Reverend Gotama, is there any sacrifice that is more profitable than these four?"
"There is, Brahmin."

"What is it, Reverend Gotama?" "Brahmin, if anyone with a pure heart undertakes the precepts - to refrain from taking life, from taking what is not given, from sexual immorality, from lying speech and from taking strong drink and sloth-producing drugs - that constitutes a sacrifice more profitable than any of these four."
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#8
Jan 18, 2011
 
There are also variations on the precepts...the first five precepts are the same...the precepts after the fifth vary:

From the Kulavaka Jataka:

The Bodhisatta made answer, "Sire, we have no other spell than this,

1)that not a man among the whole thirty of us destroys life,
2)or takes what is not given,
3)or misconducts himself,
4)or lies;
5)we drink no strong drink;
6)we abound in lovingkindness -- love all beings as self. The Bodhisatta exhorted them, saying, "Bear in mind the Commandments; love the slanderer, the king and the elephant as yourselves."
7)we shew charity;
8)do good works; we level the roads,dig tanks, and build a public hall;

When asked about their mantra, the Bodhisata answered,---this is our spell, our safeguard, and our strength."

How powerful, how wonderful are these precepts, indeed!
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#9
Jan 19, 2011
 
In the Kulavaka Jataka, the king asks what sort of mantra do you use, the Bodhisat answers:

The question being put to them, the Bodhisatta said they had got a spell (manta or mantra) And this the king's people told his majesty. So the king had them all summoned to his presence and said, "Tell me your spell."

The Bodhisatta made answer, "Sire, we have no other spell than this, that not a man among the whole thirty of us destroys life, or takes what is not given, or misconducts himself, or lies; we drink no strong drink; we abound in lovingkindness; we shew charity; we level the roads, dig tanks, and build a public hall;

--this is our spell, our safeguard, and our strength."

Awesome declaration for all Buddhists!
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#10
Jan 20, 2011
 
How do the precepts fit into the Noble Eightfold Path?

The Noble Eightfold path is understood in three skandhas. The panna, sila and samadhi skandhas.

The Panna skandha calls on our wisdom to realize the unequaled power of the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha.

The precepts fall under the Sila Skandha, or Ethical Group.

The 4th precept falls under samyak Vacca, or Wholesome speech.

The other precepts fall under wholesome actions, or Samyak Karmanta.

The organization of the Dharma is absolutely beautiful. No other tradition has such a magnificent integration of holy law, wisdom and faith.
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#11
Jan 21, 2011
 
Buddhism is the only tradition that has a meditation on ones ethics.

By constantly recalling our ethics we train our mind to not fall away from ethical standards.

In recollections known as the Dharma Adarsh-- or mirror of the Dharma, a Buddhist confirms upon reflection of his precepts, that they are unbroken and leads to concentration!
god

Hot Springs, MT

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#12
Jan 24, 2011
 
Hello wrote:
I read the following and was like, WOW!
I love the Buddha's Dhammakaya, how beautiful it is! no wonder it is called beautiful in the beginning, beautiful in the middle and beautiful in the end!
-------
The Ten Grave Precepts are from the Sutra of Brahma's Net (梵網& #32147;, Brahmajāla). The Ten Grave Precepts along with the 48 secondary precepts are called the Mahayana perfect immediate precepts (大乘& #22291;頓&#25106 ;) because they offer a direct possibility of immediately becoming a Buddha to the one who is able to realize them completely.
1-Affirm life; Do not kill
2-Be giving; Do not steal
3-Honor the body; Do not misuse sexuality
4-Manifest truth; Do not lie
5-Proceed clearly; Do not cloud the mind
6-See the perfection; Do not speak of others' errors and faults
7-Realize self and other as one; Do not elevate the self and blame others
8-Give generously; Do not be withholding
9-Actualize harmony; Do not be angry
10-Experience the intimacy of things; Do not defile the Three Treasures
-----
Truly I want to memorize this and try to practice everyday!!!
to what school of b'm do you belong
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#13
Jan 24, 2011
 
god wrote:
<quoted text>to what school of b'm do you belong
I learn from all schools of Buddhism, and respect all good teachings. I also ground myself in Buddhist teachings to learn about non-Buddhist teachings. Since Lord Buddha taught to learn all Dharmas.

Because the Mahayana school still has nuns, I am leaning towards Mahayana.

I love all of Buddha's teachings, it's poetry and beauty brings me such joy-- like no other teachings!
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#14
Feb 5, 2011
 
At morning, noon, and night successively, store up good works.—Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king .

From The Essence of Buddhism
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#15
Feb 7, 2011
 
One of the hardest precepts-- to love ALL beings as self, surely is difficult, so here are some beautiful verses to train the mind towards love:

With pure thoughts and fulness of love, I will do towards others what I do for myself.—Lalita Vistara.
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#16
Feb 20, 2011
 
Above all things be not careless; for carelessness is the great foe to virtue.—Fo-sho-hing-tsan-kin g.
Marlin The Psychic

Goodman, MO

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#17
Feb 20, 2011
 
Hello wrote:
One of the hardest precepts-- to love ALL beings as self, surely is difficult, so here are some beautiful verses to train the mind towards love:
With pure thoughts and fulness of love, I will do towards others what I do for myself.—Lalita Vistara.
I like your visions here 'Hello'.

A very nice collection of religous wisdoms.

And of the five colours of the rainbow which are blue, white, green, red and yellow that resemble to some Buddhist the five families of Buddha.

The color Blue. The buddha family. The buddha family energy is that which creates stupidity through the ability to play deaf, dumb and blind to anything that threatens the low-level stability created by ego. This same uncanny ability to be aware of everything in order to turn away from it can be stripped of the turning- away or ignoring function. Through the insight that comes from relating to the totally awakened form of the buddha yidam, ego’s game is exposed and stupidity transmutes into the wisdom of fundamental all-pervading awareness.

The color White. Vajra is associated with anger, which is transmuted into mirrorlike wisdom.

The color Green. Karma family energy manifests neurotically as jealousy and on the awakened level as all-accomplishing wisdom.

The color Red. The energy of the padma family is associated with the element of fire. Distorted by ego, it expresses itself as passion. Passion can be transmuted into discriminating wisdom.

The color Yellow. The energy of ratna, when expressed neurotically, is pride or arrogance, which can be transmuted into the wisdom of equanimity.

And the other two of the seven colors of the rainbow.

Orange is the hue associated with Bodhisattva, Manjushri. The embodiment of enlightened wisdom. He emerges from a landscape of land, water, and sky. Upraises his right arm with the flaming sword of knowledge that cuts throught illusion and reveals the essence of reality.

Purple is associated with protection of Tara.
Known as meditation "mother of liberation", and represents the virtues of success.

And maybe your music video with somewhere over the rainbow by bruddah iz
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xc2t3p_israe...
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#18
Feb 22, 2011
 
Your evil thoughts and evil words but hurt yourself.—Fo-sho-hing-tsan-k ing.
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#19
Feb 23, 2011
 
The fool thinks himself alone and commits sin. But I know of no lonely place at all.... Of a bad action my "Self" is a witness far more sharp-sighted than any other person.—Jatakamala.
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#20
Feb 24, 2011
 
Therefore should we encourage small desire, that we may have to give to him who needs.—Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king .

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