Start New Year with Good deeds

Start New Year with Good deeds

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Hello

New York, NY

#1 Jan 2, 2013
Devotees welcome 2013 with good deeds
14 hrs ago from The Star Online
SOME 500 Buddhists welcome the first day of the year meritoriously by offering food to bhikkus (monks) at the Wat Chaiya Mangalaram temple in Lorong Burma, Penang.

They lined up at 10 booths set up at the temple compound to offer items such as bread, biscuits, rice and packets of cereal.

A total of 23 Theravada monks with their alms bowls in hand, received the offerings before they conducted a 30-minute mass chanting session.

The devotees were then treated to a scrumptious vegetarian lunch prepared by temple volunteers.

The alms gathering, also known as Pindapata in Pali, was held in accordance with the teachings of Buddha to accrue merits.

Offerings of goodness: Devotees giving alms to the monks at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Buddhist Temple in Lorong Burma in Penang
Wat Chaiya Mangalaram temple trustee Sungkram Apau said it was the 10th year the temple was holding the Pindapata ceremony to mark the first day of the year.

"It is our hope that devotees start the new year with good deeds," he said, adding that some of the food offered by the devotees would be donated to charity homes.

Among the devotees was housewife Goh Ai Ting, 40, who brought her two children to join in the ceremony. They offered biscuits and packets of rice.

"This is a good way for my children to start the new year, and hopefully they could learn the spirit of giving and sharing," Goh said.
Hello

New York, NY

#2 Jan 2, 2013
“Let us then practice good works, and inspect our thoughts that we do no evil.—Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king.”

Excerpt From: Various Authors & E. Haldeman-Julius.“The Essence of Buddhism.”
Hello

New York, NY

#3 Jan 2, 2013
Others pray to god 2-5 times, depending on the religion.

A Buddhist instead does good deeds at least three times a day!

“At morning, noon, and night successively, store up good works.—Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king.”

Excerpt From: Various Authors & E. Haldeman-Julius.“The Essence of Buddhism.”

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#4 Jan 2, 2013
Hello wrote:
Devotees welcome 2013 with good deeds
14 hrs ago from The Star Online
SOME 500 Buddhists welcome the first day of the year meritoriously by offering food to bhikkus (monks) at the Wat Chaiya Mangalaram temple in Lorong Burma, Penang.
They lined up at 10 booths set up at the temple compound to offer items such as bread, biscuits, rice and packets of cereal.
A total of 23 Theravada monks with their alms bowls in hand, received the offerings before they conducted a 30-minute mass chanting session.
The devotees were then treated to a scrumptious vegetarian lunch prepared by temple volunteers.
The alms gathering, also known as Pindapata in Pali, was held in accordance with the teachings of Buddha to accrue merits.
Offerings of goodness: Devotees giving alms to the monks at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Buddhist Temple in Lorong Burma in Penang
Wat Chaiya Mangalaram temple trustee Sungkram Apau said it was the 10th year the temple was holding the Pindapata ceremony to mark the first day of the year.
"It is our hope that devotees start the new year with good deeds," he said, adding that some of the food offered by the devotees would be donated to charity homes.
Among the devotees was housewife Goh Ai Ting, 40, who brought her two children to join in the ceremony. They offered biscuits and packets of rice.
"This is a good way for my children to start the new year, and hopefully they could learn the spirit of giving and sharing," Goh said.
This temple is in Penang,where I was born.And it is in Malaysia,a country with a Muslim majority.I used to spend my evenings chanting in the chapel way back in 1996-1998 with my friend & his siblings there.

Mind you,there's a mosque nearby.Yet,there were no controversies uptodate.

When man,regardless of faith,treat each other as a human being,activities like this is possible.An overwhelming Buddhist activity,in a country with a Muslim majority.
DDR

Portsmouth, VA

#5 Jan 2, 2013
We can do good deeds twice and meditate once as well ! The benefit for others and oneself can be seen here and now, not to mention long after as well !
DDR

Portsmouth, VA

#6 Jan 2, 2013
What happen to Malaysia , didn't it used to be a non-Muslim country !
DDR

Suffolk, VA

#7 Jan 2, 2013
Interesting article on Malaysia:

" . Commenting on the controversy surrounding the recent film critical of the Prophet Mohammed, Malaysian Foreign Minister Anifah Aman asked,“Why is it when Muslims are stigmatized and defamed, it is defended as freedom of expression?”
He apparently imagines a world in which Muslims demonstrate striking forbearance in the face of shocking intolerance. He imagines a world in which Muslim states do not routinely persecute Christians, Jews, Baha’is, and other religious minorities. He imagines a world in which non-Muslims do not face arrest, prison, and death for “blasphemy” toward Islam and Muslims do not face arrest, prison, and death for converting away from Islam.
Minister Aman imagines a world in which Christian girls are not kidnapped and forced into marriage in Muslim nations. He imagines a world in which Muslim mobs do not murder Christians, destroy churches, wreck Bible schools, and wipe out entire Christian villages. He imagines a world in which Muslims treat religious minorities as they demand to be treated in societies in which they are a minority.
It is a wonderful world. But it is not the world in which we live today. To the contrary, most majority Muslim states discriminate and many persecute non-Muslims as well as minority Muslims. There’s no need for individuals to defame Christians, Jews, and others when the state imprisons and kills them."
DDR

Suffolk, VA

#8 Jan 2, 2013
"Minister Aman’s wonderful vision does not even describe his own country of Malaysia. There are worse countries, to be sure. But Malaysia now is lecturing the rest of the world about religious defamation and freedom of expression.
How does Minister Aman’s government treat Christians and others who believe differently than the majority? Consider what the most recent State Department report on religious liberty said of Malaysia:“… the constitution as well as other laws and policies placed some restrictions on religious freedom.” Muslims are barred from converting to other faiths,“although members of other religions may convert to Islam.”
Religious minorities “have expressed concern that the secular civil and criminal court system has gradually ceded jurisdictional control to Sharia courts, particularly in areas of family law involving disputes between Muslims and non-Muslims.” Moreover,“religious minorities continued to face limitations on religious expression, including restrictions on the purchase and use of real property.” Further, there have been “reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious affiliation, belief, or practice.”
Yes, the Malaysian government certainly has moral standing to lecture Americans and others about the terribly unfair treatment accorded Islam in the West.
Malaysia is no better on freedom of expression. Freedom House gives Malaysia a 4.0 freedom rating, in the middle of its one to seven system. That leaves Malaysia only “partly free.” Noting promises of political reform in 2011, the organization reported that “hopes for reform were undercut by crackdowns on academic freedom, violations of religious rights, and the passage of harsh new legislation on assembly late in the year.”
The State Department published a detailed 57-page report on the state of human rights in Malaysia. It makes for depressing reading. Concluded State:“The most significant human rights problems were restrictions on the rights of migrants, including migrant workers and refugees; and the persistence of laws that allow detention without trial.”
But that’s not all. Other issues “included some deaths during police apprehensions and while in police custody; caning as a form of punishment imposed by criminal and Sharia courts; restrictions on freedom of press and religion; obstacles preventing opposition parties from competing on equal terms with the ruling coalition; and violence and discrimination against women.” Ethnic Malays receive official preferences and “there were restrictions on union and collective-bargaining activity.” The government continued to prosecute the opposition leader on sodomy charges that many believed to be trumped up.
Other than that, everything is wonderful in Malaysia. No wonder Minister Aman felt entitled to lecture the West about freedom of religion and expression......"

" Yet Minister Aman is horrified because someone had the temerity to — shock! shock!— criticize Islam.
That the functionary of a government which unashamedly restricts both freedom of religion and expression would lecture the rest of the world about both issues comes as no surprise. "
DDR

Suffolk, VA

#9 Jan 2, 2013
" Yet Minister Aman is horrified because someone had the temerity to — shock! shock!— criticize Islam."

Gee ! Doesn't the above remind you of somebody?
Hello

New York, NY

#10 Jan 3, 2013
sampuna wrote:
<quoted text>
This temple is in Penang,where I was born.And it is in Malaysia,a country with a Muslim majority.I used to spend my evenings chanting in the chapel way back in 1996-1998 with my friend & his siblings there.
Mind you,there's a mosque nearby.Yet,there were no controversies uptodate.
When man,regardless of faith,treat each other as a human being,activities like this is possible.An overwhelming Buddhist activity,in a country with a Muslim majority.
Seeing virulent Islamic activity in the world, Buddhists minority in Malaysia should nevertheless take all measures to protect themselves.

Just as The Bodhisat protected the small kingdom in a world of conquest as Ausadh Kumar. He prepared such protection for the kingdom that invaders failed to take the tiny kingdom of Mithila.

Buddhist should always be prepared for the worst.
Hello

New York, NY

#11 Jan 3, 2013
“Virtuous deeds should be practiced today; for who can say but we may die tomorrow?—Temee Jataka”

Excerpt From: Various Authors & E. Haldeman-Julius.“The Essence of Buddhism.”

http://www.goodsearch.com/

http://clicksgive.com/

http://www.tzuchi.org/

http://www.fpmt.org/projects/make-a-donation....

http://www.palitext.com/

Here is a list of Buddhist charities and nonprofits you might want to research:

http://www.guidestar.org/nonprofit-directory/...

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#12 Jan 3, 2013
DDR wrote:
What happen to Malaysia , didn't it used to be a non-Muslim country !
a mass conversion happened 500 years ago when the local kings embraced Islam. the commoners follow suit in the spirit of loyalty to the king.

The practising Buddhists that you see now are descendents of migrants to the present Malaysia, recording a little over 200 years of presence here.

And you wanted to hint something?

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#13 Jan 4, 2013
Hello wrote:
<quoted text>
Seeing virulent Islamic activity in the world, Buddhists minority in Malaysia should nevertheless take all measures to protect themselves.
Just as The Bodhisat protected the small kingdom in a world of conquest as Ausadh Kumar. He prepared such protection for the kingdom that invaders failed to take the tiny kingdom of Mithila.
Buddhist should always be prepared for the worst.
the muslim majority govt,though they view us with much caution, yet, Buddhist centres are being set up one by one here and we are thankful for that. Penang is famous for its Kek Lok Si temple complex,the largest known in Southeast Asia. There's this Vihara Buddha Gotama & Sasanarakkha, both being Sangha training centres in Malaysia. More are coming up.

Again I stress, it's about some bad apples spoiling the whole pile.
DDR

Orange, CA

#14 Jan 4, 2013
From what I know Buddhism was around in Malaysia for thousands of years, since 200 BCE.
DDR

Orange, CA

#15 Jan 4, 2013
How can you even get that mixed up?
DDR

Orange, CA

#16 Jan 4, 2013
sampuna wrote:
<quoted text>
And you wanted to hint something?
You mean this ?
DDR wrote:
" Yet Minister Aman is horrified because someone had the temerity to — shock! shock!— criticize Islam."

Gee ! Doesn't the above remind you of somebody?
I was just saying that the part from the article above and the following part reminds me of you .
DDR wrote:
Interesting article on Malaysia:
" . Commenting on the controversy surrounding the recent film critical of the Prophet Mohammed, Malaysian Foreign Minister Anifah Aman asked,“Why is it when Muslims are stigmatized and defamed, it is defended as freedom of expression?”
He apparently imagines a world in which Muslims demonstrate striking forbearance in the face of shocking intolerance. He imagines a world in which Muslim states do not routinely persecute Christians, Jews, Baha’is, and other religious minorities. He imagines a world in which non-Muslims do not face arrest, prison, and death for “blasphemy” toward Islam and Muslims do not face arrest, prison, and death for converting away from Islam.
Minister Aman imagines a world in which Christian girls are not kidnapped and forced into marriage in Muslim nations. He imagines a world in which Muslim mobs do not murder Christians, destroy churches, wreck Bible schools, and wipe out entire Christian villages. He imagines a world in which Muslims treat religious minorities as they demand to be treated in societies in which they are a minority.
It is a wonderful world. But it is not the world in which we live today. To the contrary, most majority Muslim states discriminate and many persecute non-Muslims as well as minority Muslims. There’s no need for individuals to defame Christians, Jews, and others when the state imprisons and kills them."
Hello

New York, NY

#17 Jan 4, 2013
sampuna wrote:
<quoted text>
a mass conversion happened 500 years ago when the local kings embraced Islam. the commoners follow suit in the spirit of loyalty to the king.
The practising Buddhists that you see now are descendents of migrants to the present Malaysia, recording a little over 200 years of presence here.
And you wanted to hint something?
I think it was because of the attack of the southern Indians on Malaysia that the king in resentment became Muslim.

The real reason for the decline of Buddhism in India was due to the foreign kings who simply loved being thought of as an upper caste kshatriyA so they could look down on others.

The Brahmins at this time were manufacturing false lineages to convert the kings.

“bungai terong”

Since: Mar 08

lantang senang belama

#18 Jan 6, 2013
DDR wrote:
From what I know Buddhism was around in Malaysia for thousands of years, since 200 BCE.
It was,(the Mahayana & Tantric form) side-by-side Hinduism & indegenious religious beliefs. 500 years ago, local kings got converted by Muslim missionaries,the commoners follow suit.
DDR

Smithfield, VA

#19 Jan 6, 2013
They followed him on the path leading to hell after death and creating a living hell for others on earth.
DDR

Smithfield, VA

#20 Jan 6, 2013
Hope someone save the people of Malayia !

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