Atheism requires as much faith as rel...

Atheism requires as much faith as religion?

There are 258482 comments on the Webbunny tumblelog story from Jul 18, 2009, titled Atheism requires as much faith as religion?. In it, Webbunny tumblelog reports that:

Atheism requires as much faith as religion? bearvspuma : The only problem with this rationalization is that ita s assuming all athiests are so because theya re intelligent in the ways of science and reasoning and all people that believe in a form of god are unintelligent.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Webbunny tumblelog.

“H-o-o-o-o-o-o-ld on thar!”

Since: Sep 08

The Borderland of Sol

#183612 Nov 12, 2013
Dave Nelson wrote:
<quoted text>
Not really. That is not gravity keeping the water in the bucket. Gravity is what makes it spill. What you are describing is arrested motion of mass. The earth does similar with the motion caused by gravity being arrested by inertia. Lets matter collect.
BTW, your shoulder is what takes the beating on that.
EM is the force. It kicks gravity's butt. Why you are standing and not a puddle on the ground.
No, Dave.

It's not the "arrested motion of mass", and it's not some conspiracy-style EM woo.

It is in fact the continual motion of mass. In this case, centrifugal force.

Actually, it's properly centripetal force.

Basic mechanics, Dave. Look it up.

“MEET KIKI -She Seeks Home”

Since: Oct 10

With Established Harem

#183613 Nov 12, 2013
Buck Crick wrote:
<quoted text>
Hi girlfriend.
I don't subscribe to the balancing theory. It's a qualitative situation - consciousness vs. unconsciousness.
And the ego is always a force against peace and contentment.
Interestingly, we think of ego as being served by positive images - rich, smart, good-looking.
But the ego really doesn't care if its positive or negative. Some get their egoic service from seeing themselves as a victim, or they guy who drew the short straw in life.
Not Buck, of course.
.. consciousness vs. unconsciousness? Few people are conscious, the majority remain asleep hence dualism prevails ..

.. the ego is a form of self-protection and is intertwined with anger. A vegetarian must feel anger over the inhumane slaughter of chickens to provoke change thus making ego a positive attribute ..

.. anger, ego and passion drive humans to affect positive change. And, the dualism? When unconscious, the ego is very dangerous ..

.. without ego, peace and contentment can never be achieved ..

.. you still crave the HL scarf experience, don't you ??..

“MEET KIKI -She Seeks Home”

Since: Oct 10

With Established Harem

#183614 Nov 12, 2013
blacklagoon wrote:
<quoted text>because it's easier to say than."I reject the theists claim that an omnipotent being who created everything actually exists."
Why do you say "holy shit." Do you really believe feces is somehow holy, connected to God, anointed in some way?
.. that sounds like word salad ..

.. shit can be holy. Just ask my grandma ..

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183615 Nov 12, 2013
Dave Nelson wrote:
<quoted text>
Not really. That is not gravity keeping the water in the bucket. Gravity is what makes it spill. What you are describing is arrested motion of mass. The earth does similar with the motion caused by gravity being arrested by inertia.
I never been arrested by Inertia.

I was arrested by a guy named Iner once. Twice, actually.

I was arrested in Intercourse.(Pennsylvania)

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183616 Nov 12, 2013
Happy Lesbo wrote:
<quoted text>
.. consciousness vs. unconsciousness? Few people are conscious, the majority remain asleep hence dualism prevails ..
.. the ego is a form of self-protection and is intertwined with anger. A vegetarian must feel anger over the inhumane slaughter of chickens to provoke change thus making ego a positive attribute ..
.. anger, ego and passion drive humans to affect positive change. And, the dualism? When unconscious, the ego is very dangerous ..
.. without ego, peace and contentment can never be achieved ..
.. you still crave the HL scarf experience, don't you ??..
I think you can save chickens without getting angry.

I think anger can be justified, but never advantageous, spiritually speaking.

I need to straighten you out on some things, still.

Total escape from ego is god-consciousness. A worthy goal.

I'm not that good, but not as bad as I once was.

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183617 Nov 12, 2013
Thinking wrote:
It doesn't.
<quoted text>
And it is not infinite, round or square.

Nothing is, because it's impossible.

We have a doctor and a physicist who disagree with that.

But they are nuts.

Can you imagine how much flour would be required for an infinite donut?
Eagle 12

Edwardsville, IL

#183618 Nov 12, 2013
Kirsten Powers story of Atheism.

"I continued to think that people who talked of hearing from God or experiencing God were either delusional or lying. In my most generous moments, I allowed that they were just imagining things that made them feel good."

She worked for the Clinton administration, became a liberal pundit for the Daily Beast and a regular Democratic contributor to Fox News. On top of that, all her friends were agnostics or atheists. So when God pursued and won her reluctant heart, she was more surprised than anyone else.

"If there was one thing in which I was completely secure, it was that I would never adhere to any religion-especially to evangelical Christianity, which I held in particular contempt," writes Kirsten Powers, in a first-person account of her conversion published in Christianity Today.

The daughter of archeologist parents, she attended the Episcopal Church in Fairbanks, Alaska, but never really believed. Whatever shred of nominal faith she possessed was due to respect for her father, a brilliant man who taught himself to speak and read Russian.

After her father began to express his own doubts about Christianity while she was in college, she fell headlong into unbelief.

"What little faith I had couldn't withstand this revelation," she noted. "From my early 20s on, I would waver between atheism and agnosticism, never coming close to considering that God could be real."

Powers worked in the Clinton administration for six years and rarely saw any open expressions of religiosity. Then she moved to New York to work in Democratic politics. "My world became aggressively secular. Everyone I knew was politically left-leaning, and my group of friends was overwhelmingly atheist," she observes.

The first crack in her anti-faith armor emerged when she dated a Christian man. Immediately before this, she told a friend the only deal breaker in her dating world would be someone religious.
After they dated a few months, her boyfriend called to say he had something important to discuss. When he came over to her New York apartment he looked at her intently and asked, "Do you believe Jesus is your Savior?"

Her heart sank when she heard the question. She thought he might be slightly crazy. "No," she replied. "Do you think you could ever believe it?" he asked. Then he told Powers he wanted to get married and felt that she might be the one, but he couldn't marry a non-believer.“I don't want to mislead you-I could never believe in Jesus," Powers told him.

"Do you think you could keep an open mind about it?" he asked, hopefully.

"Of course; I'm very open-minded!" she replied, even though she knew it was not completely true in this instance. Inwardly, she found his faith "an oddity to overlook, not a point in his favor."
A few weeks later they went to church together, and a few things surprised her. First, she didn't realize a Presbyterian could be an evangelical. "When we arrived at the Upper East Side service of Redeemer Presbyterian Church, I was shocked and repelled by what I saw. I was used to the high-church liturgy of my youth. We were meeting in an auditorium with a band playing what I later learned was 'praise music.' I thought, How am I going to tell him I can never come back?" she writes in Christianity Today.

But when Pastor Tim Keller began to speak, she found herself completely engrossed in his message. "I had never heard a pastor talk about the things he did. Tim Keller's sermon was intellectually rigorous, weaving in art and history and philosophy. I decided to come back to hear him again."

She found herself returning for more, but one thing disappointed her about his messages - his mention of Jesus. She left each week with some frustration, wondering, Why did he have to ruin a perfectly good talk with this Jesus nonsense?
Eagle 12

Edwardsville, IL

#183620 Nov 12, 2013
Kirsten Powers story of Atheism. Part II

As Keller propounded the case for Christ, she began to question her atheism. "He expertly exposed the intellectual weaknesses of a purely secular worldview. I came to realize that even if Christianity wasn't the real thing, neither was atheism."

Soon Powers found herself reading the Bible. At the same time, her boyfriend was praying that God would reveal Himself to Powers. After eight months of listening to Keller, she concluded that the weight of evidence was on the side of Christianity.
Still, she didn't feel any particular connection to God. "I continued to think that people who talked of hearing from God or experiencing God were either delusional or lying. In my most generous moments, I allowed that they were just imagining things that made them feel good."

Encounter with Jesus
Then something very unusual happened to Powers on a trip to Taiwan in 2006.
"I woke up in what felt like a strange cross between a dream and reality. Jesus came to me and said,'Here I am.'

"It felt so real. I didn't know what to make of it," she recalls. She called her boyfriend the next day, but before she could tell him what happened, he said he had been praying the night before and felt they were supposed to break up.

While she was upset by the break up, she was more "traumatized" by the mystical, mysterious visitation by Jesus. "I tried to write off the experience as misfiring synapses, but I couldn't shake it," she notes.

Powers returned to New York a few days later, but felt lost and confused as she tried to process her growing consciousness of God's presence. "I suddenly felt God everywhere and it was terrifying. More important, it was unwelcome. It felt like an invasion. I started to fear I was going crazy."

She sought out the advice of a friend, author and cultural commentator Eric Metaxas, whom she knew to be a Christian. "You need to be in a Bible study," he told her. He recommended a study taught by Pastor Tim Keller's wife.

When she walked into the Bible study she felt desperate, unsure how she would ever tell family or friends about her emerging faith. She thought no one would understand because she didn't really comprehend the changes unfolding in her heart. "I had a knot in my stomach. In my mind, only weirdoes and zealots went to Bible studies."

Powers doesn't recall what Kathy Keller taught on that day, but when she left the Bible study she knew everything had changed. "I'll never forget standing outside that apartment on the Upper East Side and saying to myself,'It's true. It's completely true.' The world looked entirely different, like a veil had been lifted off it. I had not an iota of doubt. I was filled with indescribable joy."

In the next few months, a tug-of-war between faith and doubt returned at intervals. She did her best "to wrestle away from God," but found it was futile to run from Him.
"Everywhere I turned, there He was. Slowly there was less fear and more joy. The Hound of Heaven had pursued me and caught me-whether I liked it or not."

http://crossmap.christianpost.com/news/fox-ne...
Eagle 12

Edwardsville, IL

#183621 Nov 12, 2013
Kirsten Powers story of Atheism. Part I

"I continued to think that people who talked of hearing from God or experiencing God were either delusional or lying. In my most generous moments, I allowed that they were just imagining things that made them feel good."

She worked for the Clinton administration, became a liberal pundit for the Daily Beast and a regular Democratic contributor to Fox News. On top of that, all her friends were agnostics or atheists. So when God pursued and won her reluctant heart, she was more surprised than anyone else.

"If there was one thing in which I was completely secure, it was that I would never adhere to any religion-especially to evangelical Christianity, which I held in particular contempt," writes Kirsten Powers, in a first-person account of her conversion published in Christianity Today.

The daughter of archeologist parents, she attended the Episcopal Church in Fairbanks, Alaska, but never really believed. Whatever shred of nominal faith she possessed was due to respect for her father, a brilliant man who taught himself to speak and read Russian.
After her father began to express his own doubts about Christianity while she was in college, she fell headlong into unbelief.

"What little faith I had couldn't withstand this revelation," she noted. "From my early 20s on, I would waver between atheism and agnosticism, never coming close to considering that God could be real."

Powers worked in the Clinton administration for six years and rarely saw any open expressions of religiosity. Then she moved to New York to work in Democratic politics. "My world became aggressively secular. Everyone I knew was politically left-leaning, and my group of friends was overwhelmingly atheist," she observes.

The first crack in her anti-faith armor emerged when she dated a Christian man. Immediately before this, she told a friend the only deal breaker in her dating world would be someone religious.

After they dated a few months, her boyfriend called to say he had something important to discuss. When he came over to her New York apartment he looked at her intently and asked, "Do you believe Jesus is your Savior?"

Her heart sank when she heard the question. She thought he might be slightly crazy. "No," she replied. "Do you think you could ever believe it?" he asked. Then he told Powers he wanted to get married and felt that she might be the one, but he couldn't marry a non-believer.“I don't want to mislead you-I could never believe in Jesus," Powers told him.
"Do you think you could keep an open mind about it?" he asked, hopefully.
"Of course; I'm very open-minded!" she replied, even though she knew it was not completely true in this instance. Inwardly, she found his faith "an oddity to overlook, not a point in his favor."

A few weeks later they went to church together, and a few things surprised her. First, she didn't realize a Presbyterian could be an evangelical. "When we arrived at the Upper East Side service of Redeemer Presbyterian Church, I was shocked and repelled by what I saw. I was used to the high-church liturgy of my youth. We were meeting in an auditorium with a band playing what I later learned was 'praise music.' I thought, How am I going to tell him I can never come back?" she writes in Christianity Today.

But when Pastor Tim Keller began to speak, she found herself completely engrossed in his message. "I had never heard a pastor talk about the things he did. Tim Keller's sermon was intellectually rigorous, weaving in art and history and philosophy. I decided to come back to hear him again."

She found herself returning for more, but one thing disappointed her about his messages - his mention of Jesus. She left each week with some frustration, wondering, Why did he have to ruin a perfectly good talk with this Jesus nonsense?

Since: Sep 08

Rocky Ford, CO

#183622 Nov 12, 2013
macumazahn wrote:
<quoted text>No, Dave.
It's not the "arrested motion of mass", and it's not some conspiracy-style EM woo.
It is in fact the continual motion of mass. In this case, centrifugal force.
Actually, it's properly centripetal force.
Basic mechanics, Dave. Look it up.
It's arrested motion of mass. Let go of the bucket. Or put a hole in your bucket. Figure it out.

Centrifugal and centripetal are just descriptions of it. They aren't forces within themselves.
Eagle 12

Edwardsville, IL

#183623 Nov 12, 2013
Sorry for the double post

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183624 Nov 12, 2013
oneear69 wrote:
<quoted text>Thanks any way, I'm good. I see no responsibility in any of your religions, to take responsibility for the actions of mankind towards the life that exists on this planet. The only planet to sustain life in all of its diversity,in the known Universe. I do not think our home Earth , to be a stepping stone to a better place. Earth is a utopia of life, its just to bad our human ignorance and selfishness can not realize it.The greatest mystery of Easter Island( which now they have discovered the statues are buried and are much larger with hieroglyphics on them)is not how the statues got to the beach, but why an apparent civilized society, did nothing to preserve their resources for future generations.
If you think earth is a utopia, you never been to Ludlow Alabama in the summer.

And you also never been to the Danville Correctional Facility for the Criminally Insane.

Try that.

Since: Sep 08

Rocky Ford, CO

#183625 Nov 12, 2013
Buck Crick wrote:
<quoted text>
I never been arrested by Inertia.
I was arrested by a guy named Iner once. Twice, actually.
I was arrested in Intercourse.(Pennsylvania)
I bet the earth didn't budge much when they took your nasty ass down. You probably bounced a tad.

You were arrested by inertia.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#183626 Nov 12, 2013
The three christarded trolls have been up voted them self up to the limit so that no one can down vote them and down voting everyone else

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183627 Nov 12, 2013
Eagle 12 wrote:
Kirsten Powers story of Atheism. Part I
"I continued to think that people who talked of hearing from God or experiencing God were either delusional or lying. In my most generous moments, I allowed that they were just imagining things that made them feel good."
She worked for the Clinton administration, became a liberal pundit for the Daily Beast and a regular Democratic contributor to Fox News. On top of that, all her friends were agnostics or atheists. So when God pursued and won her reluctant heart, she was more surprised than anyone else.
"If there was one thing in which I was completely secure, it was that I would never adhere to any religion-especially to evangelical Christianity, which I held in particular contempt," writes Kirsten Powers, in a first-person account of her conversion published in Christianity Today.
The daughter of archeologist parents, she attended the Episcopal Church in Fairbanks, Alaska, but never really believed. Whatever shred of nominal faith she possessed was due to respect for her father, a brilliant man who taught himself to speak and read Russian.
After her father began to express his own doubts about Christianity while she was in college, she fell headlong into unbelief.
"What little faith I had couldn't withstand this revelation," she noted. "From my early 20s on, I would waver between atheism and agnosticism, never coming close to considering that God could be real."
Powers worked in the Clinton administration for six years and rarely saw any open expressions of religiosity. Then she moved to New York to work in Democratic politics. "My world became aggressively secular. Everyone I knew was politically left-leaning, and my group of friends was overwhelmingly atheist," she observes.
The first crack in her anti-faith armor emerged when she dated a Christian man. Immediately before this, she told a friend the only deal breaker in her dating world would be someone religious.
After they dated a few months, her boyfriend called to say he had something important to discuss. When he came over to her New York apartment he looked at her intently and asked, "Do you believe Jesus is your Savior?"
Her heart sank when she heard the question. She thought he might be slightly crazy. "No," she replied. "Do you think you could ever believe it?" he asked. Then he told Powers he wanted to get married and felt that she might be the one, but he couldn't marry a non-believer.“I don't want to mislead you-I could never believe in Jesus," Powers told him.
"Do you think you could keep an open mind about it?" he asked, hopefully.
"Of course; I'm very open-minded!" she replied, even though she knew it was not completely true in this instance. Inwardly, she found his faith "an oddity to overlook, not a point in his favor."
A few weeks later they went to church together, and a few things surprised her. First, she didn't realize a Presbyterian could be an evangelical. "When we arrived at the Upper East Side service of Redeemer Presbyterian Church, I was shocked and repelled by what I saw. I was used to the high-church liturgy of my youth. We were meeting in an auditorium with a band playing what I later learned was 'praise music.' I thought, How am I going to tell him I can never come back?" she writes in Christianity Today.
But when Pastor Tim Keller began to speak, she found herself completely engrossed in his message. "I had never heard a pastor talk about the things he did. Tim Keller's sermon was intellectually rigorous, weaving in art and history and philosophy. I decided to come back to hear him again."
She found herself returning for more, but one thing disappointed her about his messages - his mention of Jesus. She left each week with some frustration, wondering, Why did he have to ruin a perfectly good talk with this Jesus nonsense?
Would you please repeat all that, Beagle?

I was scratching my ass and I'm afraid I might have missed some.

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183628 Nov 12, 2013
Eagle 12 wrote:
Sorry for the double post
No problem, Beagle 12.

It just took twice as long to ignore it.

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183629 Nov 12, 2013
Dave Nelson wrote:
<quoted text>

You were arrested by inertia.
Coulda' been.

I didn't catch all their names.
Eagle 12

Edwardsville, IL

#183630 Nov 12, 2013
Buck Crick wrote:
<quoted text>
Would you please repeat all that, Beagle?
I was scratching my ass and I'm afraid I might have missed some.
Go Buck, make the tackle!

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#183631 Nov 12, 2013
Abandoning this thread due to christarded trolls Buck Crick,Dave Nelson, Eagle 12.

Buck Crick

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#183632 Nov 12, 2013
Mikko wrote:
The three christarded trolls have been up voted them self up to the limit so that no one can down vote them and down voting everyone else
Very poetic, Don Ho.

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