Why Atheism Will Replace Religion

Aug 27, 2012 Full story: News24 14,477

Please note that for this article "Atheism" also includes agnostics, deists, pagans, wiccans... in other words non-religious.

You will notice this is a statement of fact. And to be fact it is supported by evidence (see references below). Now you can have "faith" that this is not true, but by the very definition of faith, that is just wishful thinking. Full Story

“Citizen_Patriot_ Voter_Atheist!”

Since: May 09

Earth,TX

#4120 Jan 22, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Religion aspiring to the heights of Monty Python?
<quoted text>
They do dream big.
Lincoln

United States

#4121 Jan 22, 2013
Reason Personified wrote:
<quoted text>Umm, only if you think it is the atheist who believes in Moses and his pet god.
Christian religion was behind the pre Civil War abolitionist movement.
Pet atheists seemed not present at the inauguration yesterday.

Since: Dec 11

Location hidden

#4122 Jan 22, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
<quoted text>
Christian religion was behind the pre Civil War abolitionist movement.
It was also behind the pro-slavery forces. Not really a shocker since most people in the country were Christians.
Lincoln

United States

#4123 Jan 22, 2013
The_Box wrote:
<quoted text>
It was also behind the pro-slavery forces. Not really a shocker since most people in the country were Christians.
Southern states lacked public schools before the Civil War.

Since: Mar 11

Lexington, KY

#4124 Jan 22, 2013
Let us know when you have something to say turd. Oh wait wait wait! Uhhh there duh sure is lots of them there Christians! Duh duh hahaha! That'll show them atheists!

Bye bye turd!
:flush:
Lincoln wrote:
<quoted text>
Atheism declined to the level of Monty Python?

“There is no Truth in Faith”

Since: Dec 08

nowhere near a pound of $100's

#4125 Jan 22, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
<quoted text>
If you watched the inauguration of President Obama you witnessed Christianity in power.
"..so help me God.."
The "power" of religitards is waning. Some day, they will be completely powerless .... not too soon for me!

“Exercise Your Brain”

Since: Jun 07

Planet Earth

#4126 Jan 22, 2013
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
Try a 2012 survey by the CIA
The CIA World Factbook gives the world population as 7,021,836,029 (July 2012 est.) and the distribution of religions as Christian 33.35%(of which Roman Catholic 16.83%, Protestant 6.08%, Orthodox 4.03%, Anglican 1.26%), Muslim 22.43%, Hindu 13.78%, Buddhist 7.13%, Sikh 0.36%, Jewish 0.21%, Baha'i 0.11%, other religions 11.17%, non-religious 9.42%, atheists 2.04%.
Looked there, didn't find those statistics bub. Can you provide a link to the actual page?

Here's a link:

http://www.religioustolerance.org/compuswrld....

taken from a book of facts also. Atheism 12.5% not accounting for Buddhism, agnoticism, etc.

“Exercise Your Brain”

Since: Jun 07

Planet Earth

#4127 Jan 22, 2013
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
Nazareth
Many Christian were probably not aware blah, blah, blah
You are having a problem grasping the basic concepts.

A small town has been found. Yes.

Is it the 'old' Nazareth (of biblical lore)? Maybe, maybe not.

Does it prove that a man named Jesus was born there? No.

That's about all there is to it.

“Vita e' Bella.”

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#4128 Jan 22, 2013
Ooogah Boogah wrote:
<quoted text>
Christians had their time in power, it was called the Dark Ages.
I don't think it was as "dark" as you might think.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/woods/woods40.html

Part 1

Today is the official release date for my new book, How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization. From the role of the monks (they did much more than just copy manuscripts) to art and architecture, from the university to Western law, from science to charitable work, from international law to economics, the book delves into just how indebted we are as a civilization to the Catholic Church, whether we realize it or not.

By far the book's longest chapter is "The Church and Science." We have all heard a great deal about the Church's alleged hostility toward science. What most people fail to realize is that historians of science have spent the past half-century drastically revising this conventional wisdom, arguing that the Church's role in the development of Western science was far more salutary than previously thought. I am speaking not about Catholic apologists but about serious and important scholars of the history of science such as J.L. Heilbron, A.C. Crombie, David Lindberg, Edward Grant, and Thomas Goldstein.

It is all very well to point out that important scientists, like Louis Pasteur, have been Catholic. More revealing is how many priests have distinguished themselves in the sciences. It turns out, for instance, that the first person to measure the rate of acceleration of a freely falling body was Fr. Giambattista Riccioli. The man who has been called the father of Egyptology was Fr. Athanasius Kircher (also called "master of a hundred arts" for the breadth of his knowledge). Fr. Roger Boscovich, who has been described as "the greatest genius that Yugoslavia ever produced," has often been called the father of modern atomic theory.

In the sciences it was the Jesuits in particular who distinguished themselves; some 35 craters on the moon, in fact, are named after Jesuit scientists and mathematicians.

By the eighteenth century, the Jesuits

had contributed to the development of pendulum clocks, pantographs, barometers, reflecting telescopes and microscopes, to scientific fields as various as magnetism, optics and electricity. They observed, in some cases before anyone else, the colored bands on Jupiter's surface, the Andromeda nebula and Saturn's rings. They theorized about the circulation of the blood (independently of Harvey), the theoretical possibility of flight, the way the moon effected the tides, and the wave-like nature of light. Star maps of the southern hemisphere, symbolic logic, flood-control measures on the Po and Adige rivers, introducing plus and minus signs into Italian mathematics — all were typical Jesuit achievements, and scientists as influential as Fermat, Huygens, Leibniz and Newton were not alone in counting Jesuits among their most prized correspondents [Jonathan Wright, The Jesuits, 2004, p. 189].

Seismology, the study of earthquakes, has been so dominated by Jesuits that it has become known as "the Jesuit science." It was a Jesuit, Fr. J.B. Macelwane, who wrote Introduction to Theoretical Seismology, the first seismology textbook in America, in 1936. To this day, the American Geophysical Union, which Fr. Macelwane once headed, gives an annual medal named after this brilliant priest to a promising young geophysicist.

“Vita e' Bella.”

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#4129 Jan 22, 2013
Ooogah Boogah wrote:
<quoted text>
Christians had their time in power, it was called the Dark Ages.
Part 2

The Jesuits were also the first to introduce Western science into such far-off places as China and India. In seventeenth-century China in particular, Jesuits introduced a substantial body of scientific knowledge and a vast array of mental tools for understanding the physical universe, including the Euclidean geometry that made planetary motion comprehensible. Jesuits made important contributions to the scientific knowledge and infrastructure of other less developed nations not only in Asia but also in Africa and Central and South America. Beginning in the nineteenth century, these continents saw the opening of Jesuit observatories that studied such fields as astronomy, geomagnetism, meteorology, seismology, and solar physics. Such observatories provided these places with accurate time keeping, weather forecasts (particularly important in the cases of hurricanes and typhoons), earthquake risk assessments, and cartography. In Central and South America the Jesuits worked primarily in meteorology and seismology, essentially laying the foundations of those disciplines there. The scientific development of these countries, ranging from Ecuador to Lebanon to the Philippines, is indebted to Jesuit efforts.

The Galileo case is often cited as evidence of Catholic hostility toward science, and How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization accordingly takes a closer look at the Galileo matter. For now, just one little-known fact: Catholic cathedrals in Bologna, Florence, Paris, and Rome were constructed to function as solar observatories. No more precise instruments for observing the sun's apparent motion could be found anywhere in the world. When Johannes Kepler posited that planetary orbits were elliptical rather than circular, Catholic astronomer Giovanni Cassini verified Kepler's position through observations he made in the Basilica of San Petronio in the heart of the Papal States. Cassini, incidentally, was a student of Fr. Riccioli and Fr. Francesco Grimaldi, the great astronomer who also discovered the diffraction of light, and even gave the phenomenon its name.

I've tried to fill the book with little-known facts like these.

To say that the Church played a positive role in the development of science has now become absolutely mainstream, even if this new consensus has not yet managed to trickle down to the general public. In fact, Stanley Jaki, over the course of an extraordinary scholarly career, has developed a compelling argument that in fact it was important aspects of the Christian worldview that accounted for why it was in the West that science enjoyed the success it did as a self-sustaining enterprise. Non-Christian cultures did not possess the same philosophical tools, and in fact were burdened by conceptual frameworks that hindered the development of science. Jaki extends this thesis to seven great cultures: Arabic, Babylonian, Chinese, Egyptian, Greek, Hindu, and Maya. In these cultures, Jaki explains, science suffered a "stillbirth." My book gives ample attention to Jaki's work.

Economic thought is another area in which more and more scholars have begun to acknowledge the previously overlooked role of Catholic thinkers. Joseph Schumpeter, one of the great economists of the twentieth century, paid tribute to the overlooked contributions of the late Scholastics — mainly sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spanish theologians — in his magisterial History of Economic Analysis (1954). "[I]t is they," he wrote, "who come nearer than does any other group to having been the ‘founders' of scientific economics." In devoting scholarly attention to this unfortunately neglected chapter in the history of economic thought, Schumpeter would be joined by other accomplished scholars over the course of the twentieth century, including Professors Raymond de Roover, Marjorie Grice-Hutchinson, and Alejandro Chafuen.

“Exercise Your Brain”

Since: Jun 07

Planet Earth

#4130 Jan 22, 2013
Fitz wrote:
<quoted text>
Your really grasping at straws here??
The Book Table Talk Was produced by the Nazi's to give a lasting record of what Hitler believed for postarity, and was based on taped transcripts and dictation of his views.
No serious scholar contends the Hilter or Stalin were Christians.
Only church records, photographs and Nazi belt buckles.

Many people are on church rolls, there are records of their births, baptisms, weddings and deaths....are/were they all Christians? Are/were they 'true' Christians, do/did they 'truely' believe, can/could you look into their minds? No.

They, along with a gazillion others are recorded as Christians.

Sam Berkkowitz (Son of Sam serial killer) has/had a Christian website. Is he 'saved'? He says he is, many religious folk who have talked, prayed, shared with him say yes. He now calls himself Son of Faith. Some of Sam's fellow inmates say differently....are they just jealous? Are the religious leaders who have conferred with him naive and gullible? Again, can you look into the mind of the 'chubby behemoth'?

LOL....would a serious scholar attempt to untangle that Gordian Knot....especially after he dies and can't be directly contacted?

“Exercise Your Brain”

Since: Jun 07

Planet Earth

#4131 Jan 22, 2013
Fitz wrote:
<quoted text>
Is this the best you have...search the internet for Nazi-priests??
“Only the Catholic Church protested against the Hitlerian onslaught on liberty. Up till then I had not been interested in the Church, but today I feel a great admiration for the Church, which alone has had the courage to struggle for spiritual truth and moral liberty”
&#8213; Albert Einstein
You people are sooooo uneducated...
The Catholic Church protested against pedophile Priests too. An hour late and several dollars short. They've also 'unexcommuninicated' Gallileo for his so called heresy...it only took the 500 years to admit it.

A picture is worth a thousand words;0)

“Exercise Your Brain”

Since: Jun 07

Planet Earth

#4132 Jan 22, 2013
Lil Ticked wrote:
<quoted text>Yeah, I don't get it. Then again, the germans do not want even to claim Hitler.
Not now of course, but you would be surprised how many older men have the name Adolph on their birth certificates in Germany....they go by nicknames now;0) But back in the day it was the most popular boy's name.

I used to receive a monthly newsletter called Das Lieben, it gave a lot of WWII history without ever mentioning Der Fuhrer....strange, isn't it?

Times do change.

“Exercise Your Brain”

Since: Jun 07

Planet Earth

#4133 Jan 22, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
<quoted text>
Atheism declined to the level of Monty Python?
No, religion as a Monty Python skit....it's been done many, many times.

“There is no Truth in Faith”

Since: Dec 08

nowhere near a pound of $100's

#4134 Jan 22, 2013
Pietro Armando wrote:
<quoted text>
Part 2
The Jesuits were also the first to introduce Western science into such far-off places as China and India. In seventeenth-century China in particular, Jesuits introduced a substantial body of scientific knowledge and a vast array of mental tools for understanding the physical universe, including the Euclidean geometry that made planetary motion comprehensible. Jesuits made important contributions to the scientific knowledge and infrastructure of other less developed nations not only in Asia but also in Africa and Central and South America. Beginning in the nineteenth century, these continents saw the opening of Jesuit observatories that studied such fields as astronomy, geomagnetism, meteorology, seismology, and solar physics. Such observatories provided these places with accurate time keeping, weather forecasts (particularly important in the cases of hurricanes and typhoons), earthquake risk assessments, and cartography. In Central and South America the Jesuits worked primarily in meteorology and seismology, essentially laying the foundations of those disciplines there. The scientific development of these countries, ranging from Ecuador to Lebanon to the Philippines, is indebted to Jesuit efforts.
The Galileo case is often cited as evidence of Catholic hostility toward science, and How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization accordingly takes a closer look at the Galileo matter. For now, just one little-known fact: Catholic cathedrals in Bologna, Florence, Paris, and Rome were constructed to function as solar observatories. No more precise instruments for observing the sun's apparent motion could be found anywhere in the world. When Johannes Kepler posited that planetary orbits were elliptical rather than circular, Catholic astronomer Giovanni Cassini verified Kepler's position through observations he made in the Basilica of San Petronio in the heart of the Papal States. Cassini, incidentally, was a student of Fr. Riccioli and Fr. Francesco Grimaldi, the great astronomer who also discovered the diffraction of light, and even gave the phenomenon its name.
I've tried to fill the book with little-known facts like these.
......... In these cultures, Jaki explains, science suffered a "stillbirth." My book gives ample attention to Jaki's work.
Economic thought is another area in which more and more scholars have begun to acknowledge the previously overlooked role of Catholic thinkers. Joseph Schumpeter, one of the great economists of the twentieth century, paid tribute to the overlooked contributions of the late Scholastics — mainly sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spanish theologians — in his magisterial History of Economic Analysis (1954). "[I]t is they," he wrote, "who come nearer than does any other group to having been the ‘founders' of scientific economics." In devoting scholarly attention to this unfortunately neglected chapter in the history of economic thought, Schumpeter would be joined by other accomplished scholars over the course of the twentieth century, including Professors Raymond de Roover, Marjorie Grice-Hutchinson, and Alejandro Chafuen.
Bull Crud .... Christian apologist's denial bull crap. Most recently published in Rodney Stark’s The Victory of Reason and debunked in

The Tragedy of Theology: How Religion Caused and Extended the Dark Ages

http://www.theobjectivestandard.com/issues/20...

REALLY!! Christians want us to forget the first thing they did out of the gate was to butcher the most prominent Librarian of the time (Hypatia of Alexandria) and burn the library.
Lincoln

United States

#4135 Jan 22, 2013
Another self appointed Moderator.

He is soo important!

Just ask Him :-)
Givemeliberty wrote:
Let us know when you have something to say

Oh wait wait wait! Uhhh there duh sure is lots of them there Christians! Duh duh hahaha! That'll show them atheists!
Bye bye turd!
:flush:
<quoted text>
Lincoln

United States

#4136 Jan 22, 2013
albtraum wrote:
<quoted text>
No, religion as a Monty Python skit....it's been done many, many times.
"Night of the Living Dead" an atheist film?

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#4137 Jan 22, 2013
polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>
I just thought this needed to be said once again:
"Totalitarian ideologies like Stalinism and Maoism are simply religions like Islam and Christianity, but with human gods. They are all cults of personality, where worship of the leader and devotion to his pronouncements are demanded. Each is equally authoritarian and intolerant, and each has a long history of genocide."
Thank you very kindly!

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#4138 Jan 22, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
Atheism declined to the level of Monty Python?
Have you seen The Life Of Brian?

[Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life]

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#4139 Jan 22, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
Christianity seems strong in the US?
You have no intention of looking at those statistics, do you?

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