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“I started out with nothing”

Since: Nov 10

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#1927
Jul 10, 2013
 
Mikko wrote:
<quoted text>
Now you are a liar and hater
And a coward.

He is also arrogant, dishonest and condescending

Basically the worst possible combination of bad personality traits for a human being can have, and with him you must realise that I am stretching the limits of the meaning of human being.

Having said that we know he has as much humanity as a falling brick in turd factory so it’s not really surprising.
Thinking

York, UK

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#1928
Jul 10, 2013
 
Ever wondered why the UK and Sweden are not warzones, but Israel is?
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
And a coward.
He is also arrogant, dishonest and condescending
Basically the worst possible combination of bad personality traits for a human being can have, and with him you must realise that I am stretching the limits of the meaning of human being.
Having said that we know he has as much humanity as a falling brick in turd factory so it’s not really surprising.

“I started out with nothing”

Since: Nov 10

and still got most of it left

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#1929
Jul 10, 2013
 
Thinking wrote:
Ever wondered why the UK and Sweden are not warzones, but Israel is?
<quoted text>
No, not really, it’s so bloody obvious, Israel is stuffed with greedy and violent, hate mongering ignoramuses like Shibolet.

Although Sweden and the UK must (by the law of averages) be host to such vile hatred it is easily counterbalanced by decent human beings and hundreds of years of civilisation.

Israel is a new country so no calming civilisational influence has had time to develop there.

I do find it intriguing that almost all “new” countries have to show how tough they are by p|ssing further up the wall than their neighbour.

In this case, p|ssin up the wall is demonstrated by enforced relocation, inhumane treatment and the killing of unarmed children and women and of course UN disapproval earning them the coveted title of most hated nation in the world.

You really would think that Zionists would have learnt something from the horrors that Hitler and his cronies bestowed on the Jewish nation.

But obviously not.

.

This is old hat but I really think Edward De Bono’s peace plan for the middle east has scientific merit.

De Bono is one of the worlds foremost renowned lateral thinkers.

Problem:- To resolve the violence in the middle east.

His thinking

The tendency for violent aggression is increased by lack of zinc in the body

The bread/food available in Isreal is low in zinc, thus aggravating that violent aggression

Yeast contains proportionately high concentrations of zinc

Solution:- send them Marmite…

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/de-bonos-ma...

Since: Feb 13

Los Angeles, CA

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#1930
Jul 11, 2013
 

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Mikko wrote:
<quoted text>
Now you are a liar and hater
--------

Sorry Mikko, but I think you see a Psychiatrist.

Since: Feb 13

Los Angeles, CA

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#1931
Jul 11, 2013
 

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Thinking wrote:
Then that's still not how proof works.
BTW You probably meant libel, not slander.
<quoted text>
-----

I thought about libel but libel is too strong in this case. Libels is what caused Christians to kill thousands of Jews in the Middle Age.

“There is no god!”

Since: Jun 12

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#1932
Jul 11, 2013
 

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Shibolet wrote:
<quoted text>
--------
Sorry Mikko, but I think you see a Psychiatrist.
you should be locked in a madhouse
Thinking

York, UK

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#1933
Jul 12, 2013
 
I also think cutting the end off of penises causes aggression on both sides.

Maybe I'd have turned out as violent as them if I'd been mutilated.
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
No, not really, it’s so bloody obvious, Israel is stuffed with greedy and violent, hate mongering ignoramuses like Shibolet.
Although Sweden and the UK must (by the law of averages) be host to such vile hatred it is easily counterbalanced by decent human beings and hundreds of years of civilisation.
Israel is a new country so no calming civilisational influence has had time to develop there.
I do find it intriguing that almost all “new” countries have to show how tough they are by p|ssing further up the wall than their neighbour.
In this case, p|ssin up the wall is demonstrated by enforced relocation, inhumane treatment and the killing of unarmed children and women and of course UN disapproval earning them the coveted title of most hated nation in the world.
You really would think that Zionists would have learnt something from the horrors that Hitler and his cronies bestowed on the Jewish nation.
But obviously not.
.
This is old hat but I really think Edward De Bono’s peace plan for the middle east has scientific merit.
De Bono is one of the worlds foremost renowned lateral thinkers.
Problem:- To resolve the violence in the middle east.
His thinking
The tendency for violent aggression is increased by lack of zinc in the body
The bread/food available in Isreal is low in zinc, thus aggravating that violent aggression
Yeast contains proportionately high concentrations of zinc
Solution:- send them Marmite…
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/de-bonos-ma...
Thinking

York, UK

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#1934
Jul 12, 2013
 
No arguments there. The concept of "blood libel" is disgusting.

Many prominent christians don't even know about it...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifam...
Shibolet wrote:
<quoted text>
-----
I thought about libel but libel is too strong in this case. Libels is what caused Christians to kill thousands of Jews in the Middle Age.

“I started out with nothing”

Since: Nov 10

and still got most of it left

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#1935
Jul 12, 2013
 
Thinking wrote:
I also think cutting the end off of penises causes aggression on both sides.
Maybe I'd have turned out as violent as them if I'd been mutilated.
<quoted text>
I know several circumcised men who are not prone to violence but I believe there could be a case to cite pork or the lack of it as a contributing factor.

One of those guys was a school friend of my fathers, he became family friend, when I was a child our families used to go to the theatre together (his wife was well into amdram) and we had picnics and took holidays together, that sort of thing. He used to call in to visit us after synagogue because he was partial to the smoked bacon sandwiches my mom used to make on Saturday morning. I think he dreaded our excursion’s in case his one of us let slip to his wife (or kids) about his fetish for pork.

Were those bacon butties responsible for his mild manners and behaviour?
Thinking

York, UK

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#1936
Jul 12, 2013
 

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On a similar theme... my parents house shared with a charming jewish family in Cardiff when they were starting out.

The mother and her children were always asking my mother for ham sandwiches, but begged her not to tell the more observant father.
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
I know several circumcised men who are not prone to violence but I believe there could be a case to cite pork or the lack of it as a contributing factor.
One of those guys was a school friend of my fathers, he became family friend, when I was a child our families used to go to the theatre together (his wife was well into amdram) and we had picnics and took holidays together, that sort of thing. He used to call in to visit us after synagogue because he was partial to the smoked bacon sandwiches my mom used to make on Saturday morning. I think he dreaded our excursion’s in case his one of us let slip to his wife (or kids) about his fetish for pork.
Were those bacon butties responsible for his mild manners and behaviour?

“I started out with nothing”

Since: Nov 10

and still got most of it left

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#1937
Jul 12, 2013
 
Thinking wrote:
On a similar theme... my parents house shared with a charming jewish family in Cardiff when they were starting out.
The mother and her children were always asking my mother for ham sandwiches, but begged her not to tell the more observant father.
<quoted text>
So there we go, the middle east problem is solved

Just get violent morons like Shibolet to eat pork

And to think, we are not getting paid huge amounts of money by the government as De Bono earned for his insight

Since: Jun 07

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#1938
Jul 12, 2013
 
Shibolet wrote:
<quoted text>
--------
Sorry Mikko, but I think you see a Psychiatrist.
You opinions will matter after you're brave enough to prove the god you're here to lie to us about.
Thinking

York, UK

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#1939
Jul 12, 2013
 
You made me think of this peace anthem for Palestine:

&t= 175
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
So there we go, the middle east problem is solved
Just get violent morons like Shibolet to eat pork
And to think, we are not getting paid huge amounts of money by the government as De Bono earned for his insight

Since: Feb 13

Los Angeles, CA

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#1940
Jul 13, 2013
 

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Thinking wrote:
No arguments there. The concept of "blood libel" is disgusting.
Many prominent christians don't even know about it...
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifam...
<quoted text>
----

I am glad we agree on something.

Since: Jun 13

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#1941
Aug 1, 2013
 

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Your 3 BIG Myths:

1) the Big Bang when nothing exploded
and created everything.

2) rain falling on rocks and settling in a mud puddle and spontaneous self generating life sprang forth.

3) plants evolving into plant eating animals.

And when I snap my fingers you will wake up and believe these 3 myths as if they were fact.

"SNAP"
Thinking

UK

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#1942
Aug 1, 2013
 
Absolutely I agree wuth you on this point.

The German lutheran hatred of jews is what enabled Hitler the catholic.
Shibolet wrote:
<quoted text>
----
I am glad we agree on something.
Thinking

UK

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#1943
Aug 1, 2013
 
with ^

Since: Jun 13

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#1944
Aug 1, 2013
 

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"The nature of time is such that the influence of the very beginning of the universe stretches all the way into your kitchen—you can make an omelet out of an egg, but you can’t make an egg out of an omelet. Time, unlike space, has an obvious directionality—the view in a mirror makes sense in a way that a movie in reverse never would.
The arrow of time in our universe is puzzling because the fundamental laws of physics themselves are symmetric and don’t seem to discriminate between the past and future. Unlike an egg breaking on the side of a frying pan, the journey of the planets around the sun would look basically the same if we filmed them and ran the movie backwards. Rather, it must be due to the initial conditions of the universe—a fact that makes the nature of time a question for cosmology. Remarkably, the answers we’re beginning to discover are telling us there may be other universes out there in which the arrow of time actually points in reverse.

For some reason, our early universe was an orderly place; as physicists like to say, it had low entropy. Entropy measures the number of ways that you can rearrange the components of a system such that the overall state wouldn’t change considerably. A set of neatly racked billiard balls has a low entropy, since moving one of the balls to another location on the table would change the configuration significantly. Randomly scattered balls are high entropy; we could move a ball or two and nobody would really notice.

Low-entropy configurations naturally evolve into high-entropy ones—as any billiards-break shows—for the simple reason that there are more ways to be high entropy than low entropy. The very beginning of time found our universe in an extremely unnatural and highly organized low-entropy state. It is the process by which it is inevitably relaxing into a more naturally disordered and messy configuration that imprints the unmistakable difference between past and future that we perceive.
Naturally, this leads one to wonder why the Big Bang began in such an unusual state. Attempts to answer this question are wrapped up with the question of time and have led me and my colleague Jennifer Chen to imagine another era before the Big Bang, in which the extremely far past looks essentially the same as the extremely far future. The distinction between past and future doesn’t matter on the scale of the entire cosmos, it’s just a feature we observe locally.

If time is to be symmetric—if the direction of its flow is not to matter throughout the universe—conditions at early times should be similar to those at late times. This idea has previously inspired cosmologists like Thomas Gold to suggest that the universe will someday recollapse and that the arrow of time would reverse. However, we now know that the universe is actually accelerating and seems unlikely to ever recollapse. Even if it did, there is no reason to think that entropy will spontaneously begin to decrease and re-rack the billiard balls. Stephen Hawking once suggested that it would—and he later called that the biggest blunder of his scientific career.

If we don’t want the laws of physics to distinguish arbitrarily between past and future, we can imagine that the universe is really high-entropy in both the far past and the far future. How can a high-entropy past be reconciled with what we know about our observable universe—that it began with unnaturally low entropy? Only by imagining that there is an ultra-large-scale universe beyond our reach, where entropy can always be increasing without limit, and that if we went far enough back into the past, time would actually be running backwards."

http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/time_...

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#1945
Aug 1, 2013
 

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"Such a scenario isn’t as crazy as it sounds. Our universe is expanding and becoming increasingly dilute, and the high-entropy future will be one in which space is essentially empty. But quantum mechanics assures us that empty space is not a quiet, boring place; it’s alive and bubbling with quantum fluctuations—ephemeral, virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. According to a theory known as the “inflationary universe scenario,” all we need is for a tiny patch of space to be filled with a very high density of dark energy—energy that is inherent in the fabric of space itself. That dark energy will fuel a spontaneous, super-accelerated expansion, stretching the infinitesimal patch to universal proportions.

Empty space, in which omnipresent quantum fields are jiggling back and forth, is a natural, high-entropy state for the universe. Eventually (and we’re talking about a really, really big eventually) the fluctuations will conspire in just the right way to fill a tiny patch of space with dark energy, setting off the ultra-fast expansion. To any forms of life arising afterward, such as us, the inflation would look like a giant explosion from which the universe originated, and the quiescent background—the other universes—would be completely unobservable. Such an occurrence would look exactly like the Big Bang and the universe we experience.
The most appealing aspect of this idea, Chen and I have argued, is that over the vast scale of the entire universe, time is actually symmetric and the laws truly don’t care about which direction it is moving. In our patch of the cosmos, time just so happens to be moving forward because of its initial low entropy, but there are others where this is not the case. The far past and the far future are filled with these other baby universes, and they would each think that the other had its arrow of time backwards. Time’s arrow isn’t a basic aspect of the universe as a whole, just a hallmark of the little bit we see. Over a long enough period of time, a baby universe such as ours would have been birthed into existence naturally. Our observable universe and its hundred billion galaxies is just one of those things that happens every once in a while, and its arrow of time is just a quirk of chance due to its beginnings amid a sea of universes.

Such a scenario is obviously speculative, but it fits in well with modern ideas of a multiverse with different regions of possibly distinct physical conditions. Admittedly, it would be hard to gather experimental evidence for or against this idea. But science doesn’t only need evidence, it also needs to make sense, to tell a consistent story. We can’t turn eggs into omelets, even though the laws of physics seem to be perfectly reversible, and this brute fact demands an explanation. It’s intriguing to imagine that the search for an answer would lead us to the literal ends of the universe."

http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/time_...
Thinking

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#1947
Aug 1, 2013
 
Bollocks.
The Almighty Tzar wrote:
"The nature of time is such that the influence of the very beginning of the universe stretches all the way into your kitchen—you can make an omelet out of an egg, but you can’t make an egg out of an omelet. Time, unlike space, has an obvious directionality—the view in a mirror makes sense in a way that a movie in reverse never would.
The arrow of time in our universe is puzzling because the fundamental laws of physics themselves are symmetric and don’t seem to discriminate between the past and future. Unlike an egg breaking on the side of a frying pan, the journey of the planets around the sun would look basically the same if we filmed them and ran the movie backwards. Rather, it must be due to the initial conditions of the universe—a fact that makes the nature of time a question for cosmology. Remarkably, the answers we’re beginning to discover are telling us there may be other universes out there in which the arrow of time actually points in reverse.
For some reason, our early universe was an orderly place; as physicists like to say, it had low entropy. Entropy measures the number of ways that you can rearrange the components of a system such that the overall state wouldn’t change considerably. A set of neatly racked billiard balls has a low entropy, since moving one of the balls to another location on the table would change the configuration significantly. Randomly scattered balls are high entropy; we could move a ball or two and nobody would really notice.
Low-entropy configurations naturally evolve into high-entropy ones—as any billiards-break shows—for the simple reason that there are more ways to be high entropy than low entropy. The very beginning of time found our universe in an extremely unnatural and highly organized low-entropy state. It is the process by which it is inevitably relaxing into a more naturally disordered and messy configuration that imprints the unmistakable difference between past and future that we perceive.
Naturally, this leads one to wonder why the Big Bang began in such an unusual state. Attempts to answer this question are wrapped up with the question of time and have led me and my colleague Jennifer Chen to imagine another era before the Big Bang, in which the extremely far past looks essentially the same as the extremely far future. The distinction between past and future doesn’t matter on the scale of the entire cosmos, it’s just a feature we observe locally.
If time is to be symmetric—if the direction of its flow is not to matter throughout the universe—conditions at early times should be similar to those at late times. This idea has previously inspired cosmologists like Thomas Gold to suggest that the universe will someday recollapse and that the arrow of time would reverse. However, we now know that the universe is actually accelerating and seems unlikely to ever recollapse. Even if it did, there is no reason to think that entropy will spontaneously begin to decrease and re-rack the billiard balls. Stephen Hawking once suggested that it would—and he later called that the biggest blunder of his scientific career.
If we don’t want the laws of physics to distinguish arbitrarily between past and future, we can imagine that the universe is really high-entropy in both the far past and the far future. How can a high-entropy past be reconciled with what we know about our observable universe—that it began with unnaturally low entropy? Only by imagining that there is an ultra-large-scale universe beyond our reach, where entropy can always be increasing without limit, and that if we went far enough back into the past, time would actually be running backwards."
http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/time_...

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