Atheist Islamophobia... Again

Atheist Islamophobia... Again

There are 3765 comments on the Religion Dispatched story from Apr 9, 2013, titled Atheist Islamophobia... Again. In it, Religion Dispatched reports that:

Sparked by a Richard Dawkins tweet , in which he drew a parallel between Islamists and Nazis, Nathan Lean recently suggested on Salon.com that the most famous representatives of the new atheism "flirt with" Islamophobia [echoing Chris Stedman's prescient warning to fellow atheists on RD this past August]. As the article explains, Dawkins, Hitchens ... (more)

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Religion Dispatched.

huntcoyotes

“gun control takes two hands”

Since: Mar 13

outdoors

#1384 May 11, 2013
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>so the old testament wasn't your god? why not? how isn't that the same god you and the muslims worship together?
why do you deny your own mythical god? why can you not defend your cult as the proven myth it is?
you state that your god is true, but cannot counter the proof that it is a myth. why is that?
One last thing before I turn in- no, the "old testament" isn't my God, God is. Muslims and I don't worship together, nor do we worship in the same way. I have no need to defend my religon- God is real without you believing in Him, it's more fun to watch you try to prove God isn't real. I think you guys are putting too much effort into this- trying to convince yourselves...still sadly amusing.

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

#1385 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>One last thing before I turn in- no, the "old testament" isn't my God, God is. Muslims and I don't worship together, nor do we worship in the same way. I have no need to defend my religon- God is real without you believing in Him, it's more fun to watch you try to prove God isn't real. I think you guys are putting too much effort into this- trying to convince yourselves...still sadly amusing.
so you are not a christian...good to know. you have previuously supported that cult. nice to know what you say isn't necessarily the truth...

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#1386 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Sorry, genius, I don't believe prayers are spells.
So what? Spells and your prayers are the EXACT SAME THING.

You literally think you can CHANGE REALITY ITSELF, by your own will, just by uttering SPECIAL WORDS.

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#1387 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>One last thing before I turn in- no, the "old testament" isn't my God, God is. Muslims and I don't worship together, nor do we worship in the same way. I have no need to defend my religon- God is real without you believing in Him, it's more fun to watch you try to prove God isn't real. I think you guys are putting too much effort into this- trying to convince yourselves...still sadly amusing.
Did you not stop to think that us skeptics want to see the evidence for a reason? You are projecting, really, because we are asking for the evidence, you are the one making assertions.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#1388 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Sorry, genius, I don't believe prayers are spells. Didn't know Mormons had that idiocincracy, I'll have to take your word for it. Your definition of "insane" must be unique to you as you don't know me. As far as God "being a really bad god" goes, I don't believe your criteria is quite up to snuff in that regard. You're getting your Constitutional rights mixed up with something they weren't written for. Practise prejudice much?
You are insane. No two ways about that.

You >>literally<< believe that you have a special (gay) relationship with the Ultimate Creator of the Universe.

And you >>literally<< believe you can cast spells (utter prayers) by saying special ritual words, and you think that will CHANGE REALITY ITSELF to bend to your will.

Those are the very definition of INSANE.

You have all the attributes.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#1389 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>One last thing before I turn in- no, the "old testament" isn't my God, God is. Muslims and I don't worship together, nor do we worship in the same way. I have no need to defend my religon- God is real without you believing in Him, it's more fun to watch you try to prove God isn't real. I think you guys are putting too much effort into this- trying to convince yourselves...still sadly amusing.
You don't need to defend your religion because you're a liar who can't admit that you have a mental illness.

This is a common symptom of those people who choose to ignore facts, evidence, education, reason, logic - all the things that make us great humans.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#1390 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>One last thing before I turn in- no, the "old testament" isn't my God, God is. Muslims and I don't worship together, nor do we worship in the same way. I have no need to defend my religon- God is real without you believing in Him, it's more fun to watch you try to prove God isn't real. I think you guys are putting too much effort into this- trying to convince yourselves...still sadly amusing.
Its amusing to see people talk themselves into believing an imaginary creature rules not only their lives, but everyone else they happen to meet too.

But we shouldn't laugh at mental illness (unless it is voluntary)

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#1391 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Sorry, genius- I didn't get the memo about God okaying Man's inhumanity to Man, so send me a copy, okay?
You already have a copy-- it's called "bible".

Try reading the damn thing for ONCE.
huntcoyotes wrote:
If you're refering to the Bible, especially the Old Testament, don't bother.
Of course! You don't READ your own bible, do you?

Hypocrite.
huntcoyotes wrote:
If you want to perpetuate the myth about the Muslim's god, be my guest- I understand you speak from forced ignorance and it doesn't bother me in the least.
You both worship the same evil god-- good thing that god's just a myth.
huntcoyotes wrote:
Were I a terrorist, I daresay I would speak to you a little differently- perhaps even agree with you to get on your good side, kinda like a Machiavellian ploy.
You lack the requisite mental skills for such a deception.

Clearly, you are just not that bright.
huntcoyotes wrote:
Nah, you guys are simply extremely amusing in your hate-filled dilirium ways, demonstrating the exact hate, rhetoric, bias and prejudice that you think is part of being a Christian and you're too blind to see the truth- sadly amusing.
The hate is all you, bub. All you.

You belong to a hate-cult.

Deal with it.

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

#1392 May 11, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
So what? Spells and your prayers are the EXACT SAME THING.
You literally think you can CHANGE REALITY ITSELF, by your own will, just by uttering SPECIAL WORDS.
ahhh but his words are magic and spells use magic words...so the difference is....ummm....

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#1393 May 11, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>One last thing before I turn in- no, the "old testament" isn't my God, God is. Muslims and I don't worship together, nor do we worship in the same way. I have no need to defend my religon- God is real without you believing in Him, it's more fun to watch you try to prove God isn't real. I think you guys are putting too much effort into this- trying to convince yourselves...still sadly amusing.
False.

You most certainly DO have a responsibility to DEFEND YOUR UGLY HATECULT.

You people have been pushing your HATE for years: your anti-women, your anti-gay, your anti-immigrant, your anti-poor, your anti-human bigotry is everywhere.

If your ugly hatecult wasn't so much in politics?

You would just be ignored as a bunch of lunatics, like the that Hale-Bop cult.

But you are more than that-- you pass bigoted and ugly LAWS based on your hatecult.
Lincoln

United States

#1394 May 11, 2013
Malcolm Boyd brought Christianity into the streets to promote civil rights
Episcopal priest Malcolm Boyd has taken the message of Christianity outside the walls of church to champion minority rights and show that God is everywhere.

it would be natural to assume that, at almost 90 years old, the Rev. Malcolm Boyd has run out of steam. Yet here he is, still running. Running to fire up demonstrators demanding economic and social justice. Running to put together his latest column for national distribution. Running to deliver a major sermon at a packed church near downtown Los Angeles.
Running to inspire.
An Episcopal priest, writer, and activist, Mr. Boyd is also running these days as the subject of a full-length documentary film, due out later this year, by the award-winning filmmaker Andrew Thomas.
"He's a whirling dervish of activity," says Mr. Thomas, who met him several years ago while producing and filming a live performance at The Jazz Bakery in Culver City, Calif., featuring Boyd reading from his bestselling book of prayers "Are You Running With Me, Jesus?," which was published in 1965.
Boyd is often called on to serve as a "living symbol of righteous social struggle," providing "gravitas" to progressive causes, Thomas says.
Today, Boyd admits to being "not as sprightly" as he used to be as he briskly climbs the stairs to his "writer-in-residence " office at the Cathedral Center of St. Paul, the headquarters of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. "It has not been an ordinary life," he says, adding that he looks forward to his 90th birthday on June 8 with a sense of satisfaction. "I've been very fortunate with the way things have worked out."
The way things have worked has meant writing some 30 books. It has meant breaking down barriers for African-Americans, gays, and other minorities through nonviolent civil disobedience and other means. And it has meant taking the message of Christianity out of the church and into the streets.
South African Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has said that Boyd's "genius" has been to show that God is everywhere, "even for those who say they do not believe in God.
"He was ahead of his time, being a white civil rights prophet on behalf of people of color, protesting against tyranny and war, asserting God's inclusivity for all people, including gays, and offering prayer in actions as well as words," Archbishop Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has said. Today, Boyd shares a place with Tutu as an "elder" – a "North Star" guiding younger generations "beyond treacherous waters," Tutu says.
Boyd's ministry today primarily involves offering spiritual direction to a dozen or so religious leaders and others, Boyd told the Monitor in a recent interview. He had spent his early years believing he was an atheist, he says. But in his late 20s, fed up with what had become a lucrative and lustrous – but spiritually unfulfilling – career in Hollywood, he decided to enter seminary.
He was ordained an Episcopal priest in 1955, at the age of 32. "I decided I didn't want to be like those people [in Hollywood] in five years," he says.
It was his involvement in the civil rights movement, however, that changed his life forever, beginning in 1961 when he was asked to join other Episcopal priests – black and white – on a "prayer pilgrimage" freedom ride from New Orleans to Detroit to protest the segregation of interstate bus routes in the South. People were being beaten and killed by those defending the Jim Crow laws of that time. Homes and churches were being burned and vandalized.
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
You already have a copy-- it's called "bible".
Try reading the damn thing for ONCE.
<quoted text>
Of course! You don't READ your own bible, do you?
Hypocrite.
<quoted text>
You both worship the same evil god-- good thing that god's just a myth.
<quoted text>
Y

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#1395 May 11, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
Malcolm Boyd brought Christianity into the streets to promote civil rights
Episcopal priest Malcolm Boyd has taken the message of Christianity outside the walls of church to champion minority rights and show that God is everywhere.
it would be natural to assume that, at almost 90 years old, the Rev. Malcolm Boyd has run out of steam. Yet here he is, still running. Running to fire up demonstrators demanding economic and social justice. Running to put together his latest column for national distribution. Running to deliver a major sermon at a packed church near downtown Los Angeles.
Running to inspire.
An Episcopal priest, writer, and activist, Mr. Boyd is also running these days as the subject of a full-length documentary film, due out later this year, by the award-winning filmmaker Andrew Thomas.
"He's a whirling dervish of activity," says Mr. Thomas, who met him several years ago while producing and filming a live performance at The Jazz Bakery in Culver City, Calif., featuring Boyd reading from his bestselling book of prayers "Are You Running With Me, Jesus?," which was published in 1965.
Boyd is often called on to serve as a "living symbol of righteous social struggle," providing "gravitas" to progressive causes, Thomas says.
Today, Boyd admits to being "not as sprightly" as he used to be as he briskly climbs the stairs to his "writer-in-residence " office at the Cathedral Center of St. Paul, the headquarters of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. "It has not been an ordinary life," he says, adding that he looks forward to his 90th birthday on June 8 with a sense of satisfaction. "I've been very fortunate with the way things have worked out."
The way things have worked has meant writing some 30 books. It has meant breaking down barriers for African-Americans, gays, and other minorities through nonviolent civil disobedience and other means. And it has meant taking the message of Christianity out of the church and into the streets.
South African Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has said that Boyd's "genius" has been to show that God is everywhere, "even for those who say they do not believe in God.
"He was ahead of his time, being a white civil rights prophet on behalf of people of color, protesting against tyranny and war, asserting God's inclusivity for all people, including gays, and offering prayer in actions as well as words," Archbishop Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has said. Today, Boyd shares a place with Tutu as an "elder" – a "North Star" guiding younger generations "beyond treacherous waters," Tutu says.
Boyd's ministry today primarily involves offering spiritual direction to a dozen or so religious leaders and others, Boyd told the Monitor in a recent interview. He had spent his early years believing he was an atheist, he says. But in his late 20s, fed up with what had become a lucrative and lustrous – but spiritually unfulfilling – career in Hollywood, he decided to enter seminary.
He was ordained an Episcopal priest in 1955, at the age of 32. "I decided I didn't want to be like those people [in Hollywood] in five years," he says.
It was his involvement in the civil rights movement, however, that changed his life forever, beginning in 1961 when he was asked to join other Episcopal priests – black and white – on a "prayer pilgrimage" freedom ride from New Orleans to Detroit to protest the segregation of interstate bus routes in the South. People were being beaten and killed by those defending the Jim Crow laws of that time. Homes and churches were being burned and vandalized.
<quoted text>
Failed creationist troll Lincoln has given up on conversation and taken to spamming the forums like a regular John.

Witness the evolution of the failed desperate creationist troll with no morals and no proof of god.

And no spine to be able to defend his voluntary mental illness of faith.

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

#1396 May 11, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
Malcolm Boyd brought Christianity into the streets to promote civil rights
Episcopal priest Malcolm Boyd has taken the message of Christianity outside the walls of church to champion minority rights and show that God is everywhere.
it would be natural to assume that, at almost 90 years old, the Rev. Malcolm Boyd has run out of steam. Yet here he is, still running. Running to fire up demonstrators demanding economic and social justice. Running to put together his latest column for national distribution. Running to deliver a major sermon at a packed church near downtown Los Angeles.
Running to inspire.
An Episcopal priest, writer, and activist, Mr. Boyd is also running these days as the subject of a full-length documentary film, due out later this year, by the award-winning filmmaker Andrew Thomas.
"He's a whirling dervish of activity," says Mr. Thomas, who met him several years ago while producing and filming a live performance at The Jazz Bakery in Culver City, Calif., featuring Boyd reading from his bestselling book of prayers "Are You Running With Me, Jesus?," which was published in 1965.
Boyd is often called on to serve as a "living symbol of righteous social struggle," providing "gravitas" to progressive causes, Thomas says.
Today, Boyd admits to being "not as sprightly" as he used to be as he briskly climbs the stairs to his "writer-in-residence " office at the Cathedral Center of St. Paul, the headquarters of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. "It has not been an ordinary life," he says, adding that he looks forward to his 90th birthday on June 8 with a sense of satisfaction. "I've been very fortunate with the way things have worked out."
The way things have worked has meant writing some 30 books. It has meant breaking down barriers for African-Americans, gays, and other minorities through nonviolent civil disobedience and other means. And it has meant taking the message of Christianity out of the church and into the streets.
South African Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has said that Boyd's "genius" has been to show that God is everywhere, "even for those who say they do not believe in God.
"He was ahead of his time, being a white civil rights prophet on behalf of people of color, protesting against tyranny and war, asserting God's inclusivity for all people, including gays, and offering prayer in actions as well as words," Archbishop Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has said. Today, Boyd shares a place with Tutu as an "elder" – a "North Star" guiding younger generations "beyond treacherous waters," Tutu says.
Boyd's ministry today primarily involves offering spiritual direction to a dozen or so religious leaders and others, Boyd told the Monitor in a recent interview. He had spent his early years believing he was an atheist, he says. But in his late 20s, fed up with what had become a lucrative and lustrous – but spiritually unfulfilling – career in Hollywood, he decided to enter seminary.
He was ordained an Episcopal priest in 1955, at the age of 32. "I decided I didn't want to be like those people [in Hollywood] in five years," he says.
It was his involvement in the civil rights movement, however, that changed his life forever, beginning in 1961 when he was asked to join other Episcopal priests – black and white – on a "prayer pilgrimage" freedom ride from New Orleans to Detroit to protest the segregation of interstate bus routes in the South. People were being beaten and killed by those defending the Jim Crow laws of that time. Homes and churches were being burned and vandalized.
<quoted text>
funny they would use the term whirling dervish. do they not know where that comes from?

well...like i always point out...same mythical god...

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

#1397 May 11, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
Malcolm Boyd brought Christianity into the streets to promote civil rights
Episcopal priest Malcolm Boyd has taken the message of Christianity outside the walls of church to champion minority rights and show that God is everywhere.
it would be natural to assume that, at almost 90 years old, the Rev. Malcolm Boyd has run out of steam. Yet here he is, still running. Running to fire up demonstrators demanding economic and social justice. Running to put together his latest column for national distribution. Running to deliver a major sermon at a packed church near downtown Los Angeles.
Running to inspire.
An Episcopal priest, writer, and activist, Mr. Boyd is also running these days as the subject of a full-length documentary film, due out later this year, by the award-winning filmmaker Andrew Thomas.
"He's a whirling dervish of activity," says Mr. Thomas, who met him several years ago while producing and filming a live performance at The Jazz Bakery in Culver City, Calif., featuring Boyd reading from his bestselling book of prayers "Are You Running With Me, Jesus?," which was published in 1965.
Boyd is often called on to serve as a "living symbol of righteous social struggle," providing "gravitas" to progressive causes, Thomas says.
Today, Boyd admits to being "not as sprightly" as he used to be as he briskly climbs the stairs to his "writer-in-residence " office at the Cathedral Center of St. Paul, the headquarters of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. "It has not been an ordinary life," he says, adding that he looks forward to his 90th birthday on June 8 with a sense of satisfaction. "I've been very fortunate with the way things have worked out."
The way things have worked has meant writing some 30 books. It has meant breaking down barriers for African-Americans, gays, and other minorities through nonviolent civil disobedience and other means. And it has meant taking the message of Christianity out of the church and into the streets.
South African Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has said that Boyd's "genius" has been to show that God is everywhere, "even for those who say they do not believe in God.
"He was ahead of his time, being a white civil rights prophet on behalf of people of color, protesting against tyranny and war, asserting God's inclusivity for all people, including gays, and offering prayer in actions as well as words," Archbishop Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has said. Today, Boyd shares a place with Tutu as an "elder" – a "North Star" guiding younger generations "beyond treacherous waters," Tutu says.
Boyd's ministry today primarily involves offering spiritual direction to a dozen or so religious leaders and others, Boyd told the Monitor in a recent interview. He had spent his early years believing he was an atheist, he says. But in his late 20s, fed up with what had become a lucrative and lustrous – but spiritually unfulfilling – career in Hollywood, he decided to enter seminary.
He was ordained an Episcopal priest in 1955, at the age of 32. "I decided I didn't want to be like those people [in Hollywood] in five years," he says.
It was his involvement in the civil rights movement, however, that changed his life forever, beginning in 1961 when he was asked to join other Episcopal priests – black and white – on a "prayer pilgrimage" freedom ride from New Orleans to Detroit to protest the segregation of interstate bus routes in the South. People were being beaten and killed by those defending the Jim Crow laws of that time. Homes and churches were being burned and vandalized.
<quoted text>
do these people know where the term whirling dervish comes from? oh well...as I always point out, same mythical god...

did you have a point in this post? just more adverts for your cult?
Lincoln

United States

#1398 May 11, 2013
Iranian ex-President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani has registered for June's presidential election, a few minutes before an official deadline.

Correspondents say Mr Rafsanjani, 78, is virtually assured the support of reformers and could pose a real challenge to the country's conservative leadership.

Constitutionally, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad cannot stand again.

But his choice of candidate registered minutes before Mr Rafsanjani.

Hardline nationalist Esfandyar Rahim-Mashaei, a close friend of Mr Ahmadinejad, is also seen as a threat to the clerical elite around Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Iran's chief nuclear negotiator, Saeed Jalili, has also registered. He is seen as close to Ayatollah Khamenei.

More than 400 candidates in total have registered but Iran's Guardian Council - a body controlled by the supreme leader - decides who can stand.

The results of the last presidential elections, in 2009, were disputed by the reformist opposition, triggering mass street protests.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#1399 May 11, 2013
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>do these people know where the term whirling dervish comes from? oh well...as I always point out, same mythical god...
did you have a point in this post? just more adverts for your cult?
I'm liking Thor.

I mean-- if you are going to have a god? Why not pick one you can RESPECT!

Thor! Now THERE is a god you can RESPECT, he carries a hammer, he slings lightning, he wears chainmail.

Unlike your pansy-ass dead-jew-on-a-stick, who was such a wimp, he let plain old Romans drag his candy-ass to a torture-death.

And that was the end of that sad, sorry story too.

But Thor! There's a god you can RESPECT.

“ IT'S A CHOICE !!!”

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#1400 May 12, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm liking Thor.
I mean-- if you are going to have a god? Why not pick one you can RESPECT!
Thor! Now THERE is a god you can RESPECT, he carries a hammer, he slings lightning, he wears chainmail.
Unlike your pansy-ass dead-jew-on-a-stick, who was such a wimp, he let plain old Romans drag his candy-ass to a torture-death.
And that was the end of that sad, sorry story too.
But Thor! There's a god you can RESPECT.
Did you just watch Thor? You seem very excited about him? Why?

What's chainmail?

Bob, if you don't believe in Jesus, why are you calling him names like you think he's real?

ps. The 'J' in Jew is uppercase...:)

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#1401 May 12, 2013
Snevaeh legna wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you just watch Thor? You seem very excited about him? Why?
What's chainmail?
Bob, if you don't believe in Jesus, why are you calling him names like you think he's real?
ps. The 'J' in Jew is uppercase...:)
Wait ... "what's chainmail?" Erm, do you live under a rock? lol I mean seriously, even if you don't actually know, impossible as that is, you could Google it.

“ IT'S A CHOICE !!!”

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#1402 May 12, 2013
KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
Wait ... "what's chainmail?" Erm, do you live under a rock? lol I mean seriously, even if you don't actually know, impossible as that is, you could Google it.
Yes kitty, I know what it is and I could have Googled it, if I didn't... But is more fun to mess with Bob!!! LOL

“ IT'S A CHOICE !!!”

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#1403 May 12, 2013
KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
Wait ... "what's chainmail?" Erm, do you live under a rock? lol I mean seriously, even if you don't actually know, impossible as that is, you could Google it.
Why are you up so late?

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