Atheist Islamophobia... Again

Atheist Islamophobia... Again

There are 3765 comments on the Religion Dispatched story from Apr 9, 2013, titled Atheist Islamophobia... Again. In it, Religion Dispatched reports that:

Sparked by a Richard Dawkins tweet , in which he drew a parallel between Islamists and Nazis, Nathan Lean recently suggested on Salon.com that the most famous representatives of the new atheism "flirt with" Islamophobia [echoing Chris Stedman's prescient warning to fellow atheists on RD this past August]. As the article explains, Dawkins, Hitchens ... (more)

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Religion Dispatched.

Gary

Bellingham, WA

#2179 Jun 14, 2013
EdSed wrote:
<quoted text>Nonsense. Islam is just superstition. Mohammed was sent to Earth with the word of Allah? How stupid would someone have to be to take that seriously?
The ignorance of Islamists is legendary and other Abrahamic religionists should note that one cannot undermine one superstition while trying to maintain another.
Religion = superstition
And there are few sillier superstitions than that Mohammed (Police Be Upon Him) was sent to Earth as a messenger from a god.
Islam leads to behaviour like this...
https://www.google.co.uk/search...
Islam is plainly outdated nonsense. Get over it
One can simply believe that all religions are
equally valid regardless of how silly they seem.
It's the sincerity that counts.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2180 Jun 14, 2013
Uncle Sam wrote:
Just look at the muslim majority countries and ask yourself whether or not you and your family would want to live under those conditions.
Islam would take the world back 1400 years; if not the stone age.
And Genuine Christianity™ is any better?

It's adherents want women out of the workplace, back into the kitchen, preferably barefoot & pregnant with the 6th kid (or more...)

The cult is just as bronze-age misogyny as islam is.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2181 Jun 14, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>I have learned from the best, bob- you and the bobclones, lol.
The above is not an answer or rebuttal.

But that's hardly surprising: you cannot take back what you said.

Can you?

You admitted you ignore most of the bible, making you a hypocrite.

You admitted you are no better than a slave to your cult.

I pity you.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2182 Jun 14, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>My, you have such a sweet demeanor, another bobclone in the making. I am NOT "forced" to work for or obey Him, I choose to.
Riiiight... you are just another slave to your cult.

You lack even the courage to **ask****questions**-- your slave-status prevents you from doing even **that**.

Sad for you, such a waste of potential.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2183 Jun 14, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Intersting- if I concentrate my faith on the New Testament, I'm one kind of Christian and if I follow the whole Bible then I'm another. Clearly the only thing acceptable by bob and the bobclones is following bob...how dreary.
Either way? You are a self-admitted hypocrite.

**That** condition, you cannot remove, so long as you remain a slave to your cult.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2184 Jun 14, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Interesting choice of words considering they still allow stoning of lawbreakers.
Just as was done under Genuine Christianity™, when IT was in charge...

... historians call that period the Dark Ages for a reason...

... because Genuine Christianity™ was in charge, knowledge was forbidden.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2185 Jun 14, 2013
Gary wrote:
<quoted text>
One can simply believe that all religions are
equally valid regardless of how silly they seem.
It's the sincerity that counts.
Really? As sincere as those islamic pilots who flew passenger jets into buildings?

Pass.
Uncle Sam

Beckley, WV

#2186 Jun 15, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
And Genuine Christianity™ is any better?
It's adherents want women out of the workplace, back into the kitchen, preferably barefoot & pregnant with the 6th kid (or more...)
The cult is just as bronze-age misogyny as islam is.
What stone have you been under?

huntcoyotes

“gun control takes two hands”

Since: Mar 13

outdoors

#2187 Jun 15, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
Just as was done under Genuine Christianity™, when IT was in charge...
... historians call that period the Dark Ages for a reason...
... because Genuine Christianity™ was in charge, knowledge was forbidden.
Ah, Christians aren't allowed to learn and only atheists should be in charge. The World has come a long way since then, bob. When you have no valid argument, you go and dredge up some ancient history that supports your view of how it should be. In the US, we try to keep church and state apart, having learned the value of that separationbut you feel the need play trivial pursuits. How dreary.

huntcoyotes

“gun control takes two hands”

Since: Mar 13

outdoors

#2188 Jun 15, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
And Genuine Christianity™ is any better?
It's adherents want women out of the workplace, back into the kitchen, preferably barefoot & pregnant with the 6th kid (or more...)
The cult is just as bronze-age misogyny as islam is.
According to the studies I've researched, if a population doesn't maintain a growth average of 1.8 progeny per citizen, it begins to shrink. The US citizenry is closer to 1.4- so we ARE losing ground. Meanwhile, the immigrants (especially the illegal ones), being 57% Catholic, are producing more than 3 times that on the average. Pretty enlightening that you lump all Christians into one pot. Makes it easy to hate, doesn't it?

“I Am No One Else”

Since: Apr 12

Seattle

#2189 Jun 15, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Ah, Christians aren't allowed to learn and only atheists should be in charge. The World has come a long way since then, bob. When you have no valid argument, you go and dredge up some ancient history that supports your view of how it should be. In the US, we try to keep church and state apart, having learned the value of that separationbut you feel the need play trivial pursuits. How dreary.
Knowledge was forbidden by the christian churches. The world has come a long way, and christians should catch up, but you won't, that is why your numbers will continue to fall. Christianity does glamourize ignorance and stupidity, thus, it's not a surprise fewer people want to emulate you.

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

#2190 Jun 15, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Ah, Christians aren't allowed to learn and only atheists should be in charge. The World has come a long way since then, bob. When you have no valid argument, you go and dredge up some ancient history that supports your view of how it should be. In the US, we try to keep church and state apart, having learned the value of that separationbut you feel the need play trivial pursuits. How dreary.
ancient history? perhaps you've heard of the US christians trying to ban teaching science in the classroom and teaching proven false creationism instead?

not ancient at all, happening right now in the country you say tries to keep church and state apart...

facts are fun!
Lincoln

United States

#2191 Jun 15, 2013
Church and State

WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider whether prayers can be offered at government meetings -- a practice that's been common in Congress and throughout the states for more than two centuries.

The religious expression case, which comes to the court from the town of Greece, N.Y., focuses on the first 10 words of the First Amendment, ratified in 1791: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion."

That Establishment Clause was violated, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year, when the Greece Town Board repeatedly used Christian clergy to conduct prayers at the start of its public meetings. The decision created a rift with other appeals courts that have upheld prayer at public meetings, prompting the justices to step in.

Alliance Defending Freedom, an Arizona-based Christian non-profit group, appealed the case to the Supreme Court. It is supported in separate briefs by 49 mostly Republican members of Congress and 18 state attorneys general.

In a press release entitled "Prayer will be heard on high," the group noted the high court affirmed the practice of prayer before public meetings in the 1983 case Marsh v. Chambers, in which it cited an "unambiguous and unbroken history" of such prayers.

But recent legal attacks by individuals and groups claiming to be offended by such prayers have created significant confusion in the lower courts.

"A few people should not be able to extinguish the traditions of our nation merely because they heard something they didn't like," said Brett Harvey, a senior counsel with Alliance Defending Freedom. "Because the authors of the Constitution invoked God's blessing on public proceedings, this tradition shouldn't suddenly be deemed unconstitutional."

Thomas Hungar of Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher, the attorney who filed the challenge, said, "The practice of legislative prayer is firmly embedded in the history and traditions of this nation. We hope the court will reaffirm the settled understanding that such prayers, offered without improper motive and in accordance with the conscience of the prayer-giver, are constitutional."

The town allows any member of the clergy or citizen to conduct the opening prayer, and over the years prayer leaders have included a Jewish man, a Wiccan priestess and the chairman of a local Baha'i congregation. But the appeals court ruled that because Christian prayers dominated, it appeared the town had taken sides.

"A town council meeting isn't a church service, and it shouldn't seem like one," said Rev. Barry Lynn, executive director of Americans United. "Government can't serve everyone in the community when it endorses one faith over others. That sends the clear message that some are second-class citizens based on what they believe about religion."

The appeals court said the problems it found with the town's policies "may well prompt municipalities to pause and think carefully before adopting legislative prayer." That, along with split decisions out of other appeals courts in Georgia and North Carolina, may have forced the Supreme Court's hand. Three times before, it had refused to hear similar cases.

"If the 2nd Circuit's decision is what the Establishment Clause requires, then Congress has been violating the Establishment Clause since it was ratified in 1791," Klukowski said. His brief notes that in the 112th Congress, 97% of the prayers used to open House sessions were Christian, as opposed to Jewish or Muslim, yet the practice is widely accepted.

The court will hear the case in its next term, which begins in October. Its decision, expected by June 2014, could have broad implications for public schools and events, as well as for individuals who seek to convey religious messages.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2...

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

#2192 Jun 15, 2013
Lincoln wrote:
Church and State
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider whether prayers can be offered at government meetings -- a practice that's been common in Congress and throughout the states for more than two centuries.
The religious expression case, which comes to the court from the town of Greece, N.Y., focuses on the first 10 words of the First Amendment, ratified in 1791: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion."
That Establishment Clause was violated, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year, when the Greece Town Board repeatedly used Christian clergy to conduct prayers at the start of its public meetings. The decision created a rift with other appeals courts that have upheld prayer at public meetings, prompting the justices to step in.
Alliance Defending Freedom, an Arizona-based Christian non-profit group, appealed the case to the Supreme Court. It is supported in separate briefs by 49 mostly Republican members of Congress and 18 state attorneys general.
In a press release entitled "Prayer will be heard on high," the group noted the high court affirmed the practice of prayer before public meetings in the 1983 case Marsh v. Chambers, in which it cited an "unambiguous and unbroken history" of such prayers.
But recent legal attacks by individuals and groups claiming to be offended by such prayers have created significant confusion in the lower courts.
"A few people should not be able to extinguish the traditions of our nation merely because they heard something they didn't like," said Brett Harvey, a senior counsel with Alliance Defending Freedom. "Because the authors of the Constitution invoked God's blessing on public proceedings, this tradition shouldn't suddenly be deemed unconstitutional."
Thomas Hungar of Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher, the attorney who filed the challenge, said, "The practice of legislative prayer is firmly embedded in the history and traditions of this nation. We hope the court will reaffirm the settled understanding that such prayers, offered without improper motive and in accordance with the conscience of the prayer-giver, are constitutional."
The town allows any member of the clergy or citizen to conduct the opening prayer, and over the years prayer leaders have included a Jewish man, a Wiccan priestess and the chairman of a local Baha'i congregation. But the appeals court ruled that because Christian prayers dominated, it appeared the town had taken sides.
"A town council meeting isn't a church service, and it shouldn't seem like one," said Rev. Barry Lynn, executive director of Americans United. "Government can't serve everyone in the community when it endorses one faith over others. That sends the clear message that some are second-class citizens based on what they believe about religion."
The appeals court said the problems it found with the town's policies "may well prompt municipalities to pause and think carefully before adopting legislative prayer." That, along with split decisions out of other appeals courts in Georgia and North Carolina, may have forced the Supreme Court's hand. Three times before, it had refused to hear similar cases.
"If the 2nd Circuit's decision is what the Establishment Clause requires, then Congress has been violating the Establishment Clause since it was ratified in 1791," Klukowski said. His brief notes that in the 112th Congress, 97% of the prayers used to open House sessions were Christian, as opposed to Jewish or Muslim, yet the practice is widely accepted.
The court will hear the case in its next term, which begins in October. Its decision, expected by June 2014, could have broad implicatio
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2...
shouldn't people show up to work ready to work and take care of their personal things, which their religion is, on their personal time?

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2193 Jun 15, 2013
Uncle Sam wrote:
<quoted text>
What stone have you been under?
It is you, idiot, who's living the lie.

That's the way with ALL you Genuine Christians™.

You literally persecute people to the point of suicide, because of your ugliness.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2194 Jun 15, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>Ah, Christians aren't allowed to learn and only atheists should be in charge.
This sentence makes zero since, not even in the context of the dark ages...

... but that's okay. Neither does 99.99% of your bible...
huntcoyotes wrote:
The World has come a long way since then, bob.
Yes. The US Constitution STRICTLY FORBIDS RELIGIOUS RULE.

For a very good reason: religious rule is EVIL. Period.

Witness all the RELIGIOUS POLITICIANS who pretty much speak evil every time they open their mouths.
huntcoyotes wrote:
When you have no valid argument, you go and dredge up some ancient history that supports your view of how it should be.
It's not that ancient, and it is DIRECTLY TO THE POINT:

When you ugly christians are IN CHARGE?

Atrocity abounds.
huntcoyotes wrote:
In the US, we try to keep church and state apart, having learned the value of that separationbut you feel the need play trivial pursuits. How dreary.
Yet, you ugly Genuine Christholes™ keep trying to REMOVE that separation.

What with your "put the 10 commandments in courthouses" and other nefarious shitstuff.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#2195 Jun 15, 2013
huntcoyotes wrote:
<quoted text>According to the studies I've researched, if a population doesn't maintain a growth average of 1.8 progeny per citizen, it begins to shrink. The US citizenry is closer to 1.4- so we ARE losing ground. Meanwhile, the immigrants (especially the illegal ones), being 57% Catholic, are producing more than 3 times that on the average. Pretty enlightening that you lump all Christians into one pot. Makes it easy to hate, doesn't it?
Your post is just DRIPPING with ... "compassion". Not.

Your hate of immigrants is duly noted and recorded.

Ironic, as YOU are from immigrants, too...
Uncle Sam

Beckley, WV

#2196 Jun 15, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
It is you, idiot, who's living the lie.
That's the way with ALL you Genuine Christians™.
You literally persecute people to the point of suicide, because of your ugliness.
Right, you Christophobe.

huntcoyotes

“gun control takes two hands”

Since: Mar 13

outdoors

#2197 Jun 15, 2013
KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
Knowledge was forbidden by the christian churches. The world has come a long way, and christians should catch up, but you won't, that is why your numbers will continue to fall. Christianity does glamourize ignorance and stupidity, thus, it's not a surprise fewer people want to emulate you.
Wrong again, sport- I know MANY educated people who are Christian and I'm just one person- try again.

huntcoyotes

“gun control takes two hands”

Since: Mar 13

outdoors

#2198 Jun 15, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
Your post is just DRIPPING with ... "compassion". Not.
Your hate of immigrants is duly noted and recorded.
Ironic, as YOU are from immigrants, too...
Wrong again, bob. I'm against i-l-l-e-g-a-l immigrants, the #s were just for comparison. PS- I'm NA.

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