Liberalism, atheism linked to IQ

Liberalism, atheism linked to IQ

There are 1044 comments on the CNN story from Feb 26, 2010, titled Liberalism, atheism linked to IQ. In it, CNN reports that:

Political, religious and sexual behaviors may be reflections of intelligence, a new study finds.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CNN.

“ecrasez l'infame”

Since: May 08

Atlanta, Georgia

#977 May 23, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, I'm a recently retired doc. I'm from California, but relocated to Missouri in 1998 to escape the HMOs, and closed the office last August. My wife and I have moved to Mexico for our retirement. I'm part of that flight from the practice of medicine that you may have read about. Many of us were dissatisfied with modern the modern medical milieu, and have been looking for ways out early. I found it and grabbed it.
Payer reimbursement reforms - good luck with that.
It's gonna get worse. Oct. 2013 ICD-10 becomes mandatory for all private practice reporting. This isn't just a little update, it's a total rewrite. And, if we can't shoot down the Affordable Healthcare Act, all private practice income will be 3rd-party payers (everybody must have insurance or pay a fine).

I am convinced any provider who can bail, will bail, especially our older, more experienced physicians. They are not gonna want to learn a whole new diagnosis coding system (going from about 10k codes to about 80k codes). And they are not gonna be happy with 100% 3-rd party payer reimbursement and the insurance companies having total control of healthcare.

What we're looking to do here is create a "level playing field" in payer-provider negotiations (something that has never existed) and eliminate all the obfuscations payers are currently allowed.

Might not mitigate all the impact of "healthcare reform", but may give providers enough breathing room to hang in for a while longer!!

(My wife and I are both involved in private practice consulting, if you couldn't tell.)

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#978 May 23, 2010
Hedonist wrote:
<quoted text>
It's gonna get worse. Oct. 2013 ICD-10 becomes mandatory for all private practice reporting. This isn't just a little update, it's a total rewrite. And, if we can't shoot down the Affordable Healthcare Act, all private practice income will be 3rd-party payers (everybody must have insurance or pay a fine).
I am convinced any provider who can bail, will bail, especially our older, more experienced physicians. They are not gonna want to learn a whole new diagnosis coding system (going from about 10k codes to about 80k codes). And they are not gonna be happy with 100% 3-rd party payer reimbursement and the insurance companies having total control of healthcare.
What we're looking to do here is create a "level playing field" in payer-provider negotiations (something that has never existed) and eliminate all the obfuscations payers are currently allowed.
Might not mitigate all the impact of "healthcare reform", but may give providers enough breathing room to hang in for a while longer!!
(My wife and I are both involved in private practice consulting, if you couldn't tell.)
Reading your post sent shivers down my spine just like revisiting Fort Ord (basic training) and University Hospital (third and fourth years of med school) years later caused a dysphoric feeling to well up.

I'll bet that you're very familiar with the things that caused me to leave. Here’s several :

[1] There's the electronic health record (EHR) that will be mandatory by 2013, an unfunded mandate that would have cost me about $40,000 for the hardware and software necessary for something that can't generate revenue: a paperless chart.

[2] I would also have been expected to put in electronic prescription issuing terminals in each exam room ($5000), and then subscribe to a WAN that would connect us to pharmacies, for $200/month. Once again, an unfounded mandate that costs money but generates no revenue.

[3] There's that ridiculous SGR (sustainable growth rate) formula that dangles over our heads every year and that Congress refuses to fix permanently : http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2010/05/03/g...

[4] How about that infinitely offensive ban on pharmaceutical companies giving even a ball-point pen to physicians, because everybody knows that there's nothing a physician won't do for a pen. Assholes : http://timeinmoments.wordpress.com/2009/01/01...

[5] How about managaed care plans that require me to get on the telephone to beg for authorization for a neck film (cervical X-ray) from some bimbette named Kylie or Heather? I shit you not, one of these genii asked me why I wanted an x-ray of the cervix of a man with neck pain. Then I heard her crack her gum over the phone. I asked her if there were any adults present, and to please put one on the phone. Un-friggin-believable that the decision is Heather's. And we'll wait twenty to forty-five minutes to get to speak to her.

[6] Were you aware that innocent billing errors to Medicare are considered racketeering, and are prosecuted under the RICO statutes designed to deal with organized crime? http://www.mlhorwitzlaw.com/PracticeAreas/Med... [scroll down for RICO stuff]

[7] Did you know that Medicaid requires doctors to provide interpreters for their deaf and non-English speaking patients at the doctors own expense, one which far exceeds the amount that Medicaid will pay him? http://www.facebook.com/note.php...

[8] The latest has to do with medical offices being considered money lenders and having to comply with some bizarre banking regulations because we let people go out the door owing money that we will bill an insurer for.

The ICD-10 update will play hell with every office, and cost a bundle in billing software updates – usually about $2000-$8000, again without generating any revenue to offset these expenditures.

I'd had enough.
nina

Surrey, Canada

#979 May 23, 2010
Hedonist wrote:
<quoted text>
It's gonna get worse. Oct. 2013 ...
is that why the godbots have now picked that year as the endtimes?

Since: Sep 09

Australia

#980 May 24, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
Reading your post sent shivers down my spine just like revisiting Fort Ord (basic training) and University Hospital (third and fourth years of med school) years later caused a dysphoric feeling to well up.
I'll bet that you're very familiar with the things that caused me to leave. Here’s several :
[1] There's the electronic health record (EHR) that will be mandatory by 2013, an unfunded mandate that would have cost me about $40,000 for the hardware and software necessary for something that can't generate revenue: a paperless chart.
[2] I would also have been expected to put in electronic prescription issuing terminals in each exam room ($5000), and then subscribe to a WAN that would connect us to pharmacies, for $200/month. Once again, an unfounded mandate that costs money but generates no revenue.
[3] There's that ridiculous SGR (sustainable growth rate) formula that dangles over our heads every year and that Congress refuses to fix permanently : http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2010/05/03/g...
[4] How about that infinitely offensive ban on pharmaceutical companies giving even a ball-point pen to physicians, because everybody knows that there's nothing a physician won't do for a pen. Assholes : http://timeinmoments.wordpress.com/2009/01/01...
[5] How about managaed care plans that require me to get on the telephone to beg for authorization for a neck film (cervical X-ray) from some bimbette named Kylie or Heather? I shit you not, one of these genii asked me why I wanted an x-ray of the cervix of a man with neck pain. Then I heard her crack her gum over the phone. I asked her if there were any adults present, and to please put one on the phone. Un-friggin-believable that the decision is Heather's. And we'll wait twenty to forty-five minutes to get to speak to her.
[6] Were you aware that innocent billing errors to Medicare are considered racketeering, and are prosecuted under the RICO statutes designed to deal with organized crime? http://www.mlhorwitzlaw.com/PracticeAreas/Med... [scroll down for RICO stuff]
[7] Did you know that Medicaid requires doctors to provide interpreters for their deaf and non-English speaking patients at the doctors own expense, one which far exceeds the amount that Medicaid will pay him? http://www.facebook.com/note.php...
[8] The latest has to do with medical offices being considered money lenders and having to comply with some bizarre banking regulations because we let people go out the door owing money that we will bill an insurer for.
The ICD-10 update will play hell with every office, and cost a bundle in billing software updates – usually about $2000-$8000, again without generating any revenue to offset these expenditures.
I'd had enough.
You just gave me a picture of why your health system doesn't work, without even knowing what's wrong with it.

Funny how bureaucrats think they can fix things with more bureaucracy. Did the US feds even consult Doctors/Nurses/Administrators with what needed to be changed?

Come to Aus, the gov here looks after Doctors like there an endangered species. Being a Doctor would make it easy to immigrate.

“Hello homo sapiens sapiens.”

Since: Mar 07

A galaxy near you.

#981 May 24, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, I'm a recently retired doc. I'm from California, but relocated to Missouri in 1998 to escape the HMOs, and closed the office last August. My wife and I have moved to Mexico for our retirement. I'm part of that flight from the practice of medicine that you may have read about. Many of us were dissatisfied with modern the modern medical milieu, and have been looking for ways out early. I found it and grabbed it.
Not to mention, you've had a movie star named after you;0)

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#982 May 24, 2010
legsofahighlander wrote:
Come to Aus, the gov here looks after Doctors like there an endangered species. Being a Doctor would make it easy to immigrate.
Funny that you should mention that. Your government may take good care of its physicians, but it's not keen on adding to their number:
http://www.topix.com/forum/topstories/TSHQAVD...

I'm glad that you got that from my post. You are exactly right. Imagine, a perfect storm is brewing:[1] docs are fleeing the profession with hair on fire as fast as possible, many in our fifties just as [2] the first wave of boomers (born 1946-64) hits Medicare age (65) next year, and [3] as thirty million new people are being injected into the pool with the recent health care bill (if it survives the Supreme Court).

Yet they pick this point in time to slap the entire profession with a deeply offensive and gratuitous ruling against physicians (and physicians alone) taking ball point pens, calling it an ethical violation. Obviously, they think that I would whore myself and prescribe a dangerous, unnecessary and expensive medication to a patient for a ball-point pen. I have just two words for that, and the first one is fuck.

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#983 May 24, 2010
DebJ wrote:
<quoted text>
Not to mention, you've had a movie star named after you;0)
LOL. That's an embarrassment.[DebJ and several others know my actual name, which I share with a celebrity that I don't admire.]
SupaAFC

London, UK

#984 May 24, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL. That's an embarrassment.[DebJ and several others know my actual name, which I share with a celebrity that I don't admire.]
I'll hazard a guess at Stevie Nicks...

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#985 May 24, 2010
SupaAFC wrote:
<quoted text>
I'll hazard a guess at Stevie Nicks...
LOL. Actually, it's Lady Gaga.
SupaAFC

London, UK

#986 May 24, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL. Actually, it's Lady Gaga.
I was close... somewhat...

Since: Sep 09

Australia

#987 May 24, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
Funny that you should mention that. Your government may take good care of its physicians, but it's not keen on adding to their number:
http://www.topix.com/forum/topstories/TSHQAVD...
I'm glad that you got that from my post. You are exactly right. Imagine, a perfect storm is brewing:[1] docs are fleeing the profession with hair on fire as fast as possible, many in our fifties just as [2] the first wave of boomers (born 1946-64) hits Medicare age (65) next year, and [3] as thirty million new people are being injected into the pool with the recent health care bill (if it survives the Supreme Court).
Yet they pick this point in time to slap the entire profession with a deeply offensive and gratuitous ruling against physicians (and physicians alone) taking ball point pens, calling it an ethical violation. Obviously, they think that I would whore myself and prescribe a dangerous, unnecessary and expensive medication to a patient for a ball-point pen. I have just two words for that, and the first one is fuck.
Truly a kick in the teeth mate.

Seems a heap of Asian Doctors beat you to the punch, there are heaps of foreign doctors here its not funny. My Doctor is Indian.

The pastry chef positions have been pulled just like the hairdresser ones, when it was realised a heap of Indian students were scamming the system for residency, via student college scams. Funny thing was as soon as residency was acquired the pastry or hairdresser jobs were ditched and all of a sudden these peoples were trying to get higher paid jobs. Who could blame them really.

The gov here is pushing a health reform but all it seems to create is more bureaucracy and bureaucrats. 100's of millions of dollars will be spent on a computer program, which no doubt will have glitches.

“ecrasez l'infame”

Since: May 08

Atlanta, Georgia

#988 May 25, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
...I'd had enough.
Ok, you've got quite a shopping list there! Some of which are valid concerns. However, some are mis-understandings.

Things like EMRs (EHRs, PHRs, etc.) are good. They will allow us to acheive mega-analysis and continuity of care goals that will improve healthcare for all. ICD-10 is an international standard we are already 10 years late in implementing in the U.S.

I have my entire medical record on a USB I wear on my wrist like a med-alert bracelet. It has my insurance info, current & past meds, allergies, doctors I use by specialty with contact info, and all my labs.(Basically the entire SOAP note sans Subjective). Right now, there are only about 10% of the doctors & hospitals that can make use of this data (CCD format), but we are working for full capability worldwide. If I end up unconscious in an ER in Europe, my "Personal Health Record" could be my lifesaver.

Also, about 15 years ago I had histoplasmosis. I've never been to the Ohio River valley. Is this a unique case or is there a pattern emerging? Is this fungus spreading? If it is (or isn't), what is the best clinical pathway for treatment? This is all mega-data analysis capabilities which we are working toward with regional EHRs (a few testbeds already in work).

Now, on the dark side, you are right, Medicare and ALL the insurance companies are out to screw you.(Did you know that insurance companies are exempt from the same federalti-trust regulations that you, as a doctor, could go to jail for?)
In fact, most (I'd guess 80%) practice consulting companies are just in it to take your money.

But doctors are such easy marks! According to the ACP, 50% of their doctors are in practices of 5 or fewer physicians (20% of these solo). Almost every one of these practices uses a wife, brother, or glorified receptionist as their office manager/billing manager. Doctors don't understand business, breakeven, margin, anything about running their multi-million dollar enterprises. But, as I have often heard doctors say -- "I'm running a clinic, not a business"..."Medicin e is hard, any monkey should be able to run my front office"...etc.

“ecrasez l'infame”

Since: May 08

Atlanta, Georgia

#989 May 25, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
...
[2] I would also have been expected to put in electronic prescription issuing terminals in each exam room ($5000), and then subscribe to a WAN that would connect us to pharmacies, for $200/month. Once again, an unfounded mandate that costs money but generates no revenue.
Not true, one readily accessable terminal would suffice, and an EMR has this capability built in, so you wouldn't need anything extra. WAN is any internet connection. You're talking ~$50/month, but you need it anyway for electronic filing, eligibility verification, PHR access, etc.
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
[3] There's that ridiculous SGR (sustainable growth rate) formula that dangles over our heads every year and that Congress refuses to fix permanently : http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2010/05/03/g...
[4] How about that infinitely offensive ban on pharmaceutical companies giving even a ball-point pen to physicians, because everybody knows that there's nothing a physician won't do for a pen. Assholes : http://timeinmoments.wordpress.com/2009/01/01...
[5] How about managaed care plans that require me to get on the telephone to beg for authorization for a neck film (cervical X-ray) from some bimbette named Kylie or Heather? I shit you not, one of these genii asked me why I wanted an x-ray of the cervix of a man with neck pain. Then I heard her crack her gum over the phone. I asked her if there were any adults present, and to please put one on the phone. Un-friggin-believable that the decision is Heather's. And we'll wait twenty to forty-five minutes to get to speak to her.
All true.

But I'll note that drup reps can still buy lunch for your entire office. Most internal medicine practices I know never pay for their own lunch, and they have drup reps scheduled out weeks in advance. I, as a consumer, don't like paying for practice lunches as part of the cost of my meds.
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
[6] Were you aware that innocent billing errors to Medicare are considered racketeering, and are prosecuted under the RICO statutes designed to deal with organized crime? http://www.mlhorwitzlaw.com/PracticeAreas/Med... [scroll down for RICO stuff]

Not true. A few very media hyped cases with real abuses and some lawyers "ambulance chasing" paranoid doctors.

[QUOTE who="It aint necessarily so"]<quoted text>
[7] Did you know that Medicaid requires doctors to provide interpreters for their deaf and non-English speaking patients at the doctors own expense, one which far exceeds the amount that Medicaid will pay him? http://www.facebook.com/note.php...
Not true (yet). But will require close monitoring.
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
[8] The latest has to do with medical offices being considered money lenders and having to comply with some bizarre banking regulations because we let people go out the door owing money that we will bill an insurer for....
Sort of true, but being positively address. Practices are beginning to work with Visa and other methods to handle this issue. AND this is actually allowing practices to severely cut their DRO (Days Receivables Outstanding) and pass the burden of the float over to Visa.

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#990 May 25, 2010
Hedonist wrote:
<quoted text>
Ok, you've got quite a shopping list there! Some of which are valid concerns. However, some are mis-understandings.
Things like EMRs (EHRs, PHRs, etc.) are good. They will allow us to acheive mega-analysis and continuity of care goals that will improve healthcare for all. ICD-10 is an international standard we are already 10 years late in implementing in the U.S.
I have my entire medical record on a USB I wear on my wrist like a med-alert bracelet. It has my insurance info, current & past meds, allergies, doctors I use by specialty with contact info, and all my labs.(Basically the entire SOAP note sans Subjective). Right now, there are only about 10% of the doctors & hospitals that can make use of this data (CCD format), but we are working for full capability worldwide. If I end up unconscious in an ER in Europe, my "Personal Health Record" could be my lifesaver.
Also, about 15 years ago I had histoplasmosis. I've never been to the Ohio River valley. Is this a unique case or is there a pattern emerging? Is this fungus spreading? If it is (or isn't), what is the best clinical pathway for treatment? This is all mega-data analysis capabilities which we are working toward with regional EHRs (a few testbeds already in work).
I never said that EMR was a bad idea. I just said I didn't want to pay for it. If the US wants my patients' charts digitalized, then the US can provide the necessary hardware, software and support services. And they can assume liability for safeguarding the data from hackers.

To those who feel that their doctor should absorb this substantial cost, well, some undoubtedly will. Others will merely pack their possessions, close their offices, say, "Adios, amigos!" and find a better way to enjoy their savings (clicks margarita glass).

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#991 May 25, 2010
Hedonist wrote:
Now, on the dark side, you are right, Medicare and ALL the insurance companies are out to screw you.(Did you know that insurance companies are exempt from the same federalti-trust regulations that you, as a doctor, could go to jail for?)
In fact, most (I'd guess 80%) practice consulting companies are just in it to take your money.
Of course I know. The deck has been stacked for years. When senior HMO's hit the scene in the late eighties and early nineties, they were allowed the right to not have to collect a 20% copay, which is a violation of Medicare policy for physicians. We couldn't compete. I tried to resist the HMO's, but my patients flocked to them, and my choices were to embrace them or quit.

You wrote, "you are right, Medicare and ALL the insurance companies are out to screw you." That's correct, and at every turn. Since you are aware that Medicare is a piece of the American government, you are aware that you just reported that America was trying to screw me with at least one of its tentacles.

You posted that so matter-of-factly. But that's major, as major as the FDA cooperating with Merck to conceal the dangers of Vioxx from the American people. Hey, Hedonist: that's an enemy. I prescribed that drug to many people. I feel SO FUCKING betrayed.

You know what. I'm feeling rage just thinking about all of this. Those who have been posting with me for the last several months are aware of my hostility toward the American government, and a lot of it comes from being an American physician. I felt betrayed at every turn, and eventually realized that I was pledging allegiance to an enemy. Homey don't play dat.

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#992 May 25, 2010
It aint necessarily s0 wrote:
[2] I would also have been expected to put in electronic prescription issuing terminals in each exam room ($5000), and then subscribe to a WAN that would connect us to pharmacies, for $200/month. Once again, an unfounded mandate that costs money but generates no revenue.
Hedonist wrote:
Not true, one readily accessable terminal would suffice, and an EMR has this capability built in, so you wouldn't need anything extra. WAN is any internet connection. You're talking ~$50/month, but you need it anyway for electronic filing, eligibility verification, PHR access, etc.
The last I read on the subject told me that I could expect to pay an extra fee every month, as much as $200/month, to utilize this service. I stopped reading about it once I decided to close up my office. It's possible that this was never true, or is no longer true.

This piece talks about the up front costs, which they estimate at about $3000. It's the exact same argument. I was simply never willing to pay to do this. Why should I? My handwriting is legible, and I NEVER ONCE in twenty-five years - not one single time - was called by a pharmacy to ask what my prescription said.

From http://www.european-hospital.com/en/article/5...

"The US Department of Health and Human Services estimated in 2007 that the first year costs of implementing an electronic prescription system would be $3,000 per physician. Since physicians themselves do not benefit, the question is who would pay this expense."

I'm not sure what your purpose was with your correction, or whether you are saying that my complaint isn't as valid as I think (you scratched a few items off my list)

This element, whether $200/mo or $3000, like the $25-50,000 EMR/EHR start-up expense, still stand on my list as barriers against remaining in practice. What I am trying to resist saying (because it is unseemly), but after 25 years of being whittled away at, I wasn't going to be voluntarily giving ANYTHING to the system any more for free (at my expense), whether that is $200/mo or $3000.

And the other point to recall here is that even if some of my fears were unfounded, what matters is the perceptions of the physicians, because they're the ones bailing out, and they're the ones somebody needs to convince to remain American physicians.

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#993 May 25, 2010
Hedonist wrote:
I'll note that drup reps can still buy lunch for your entire office. Most internal medicine practices I know never pay for their own lunch, and they have drup reps scheduled out weeks in advance. I, as a consumer, don't like paying for practice lunches as part of the cost of my meds.
That's great. But it misses my point, which isn't that I wasn't getting anything free.

I'm still very offended by the pen thing. I didn't care about getting pens. I cared about the implications of the decision, and what it implied about me, and what it said about the attitude toward physicians of the culture in which I operated.

Once again, your perspective is interesting, and I thank you for sharing it. But I'm trying to tell you what physicians are experiencing - in this case, an insult - and giving you one person's reaction to that.

That you, "don't like paying for practice lunches as part of the cost of my meds" is understandable. My mother says the same thing. Me either. But why are we discussing this now? I was telling you some of the issues that are contributing to physician dissatisfaction and the physician shortfall that is looming.

And frankly, I don't expect you or anybody else to care about the plight of doctors. It's not your problem until it is.

But the very fact that as I am trying to describe to you my deep dissatisfaction with the milieu that had been carved out for me, and why I'm angry that physicians alone in the US are considered too corruptible to give a pen (no such rule applies to your dentist, attorney, butcher, accountant, whatever - just us), you have decided that I need to hear that I was getting lunches that you don't want to pay for recapitulates what I experienced over and again.

Oh well. Fortunately, I'm out of it, and although I watch with interest, it's not my problem any more.
Epicurus

Winter Park, FL

#994 May 25, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<removed>
<quoted text>
And the other point to recall here is that even if some of my fears were unfounded, what matters is the perceptions of the physicians, because they're the ones bailing out, and they're the ones somebody needs to convince to remain American physicians.
September 7, 2007 in International Health Care Systems | 11 comments

Yesterday, the Wall Street Journal (“…Model For U.S. Health-Care System“) investigated recent reforms in the health care system in the Netherlands.

New System in Town

The new system has the following major characteristics:

•All individuals must be insured

•All individuals purchase health insurance on the private market

•Individuals can choose to get their health insurance through their employer–if the option is available–but the employer does not have to offer health insurance. If the employer does not offer health insurance or if an individual is unemployed, then they must purchase health insurance on the private market.

•Health insurers are free to charge each individual any price they please for health insurance. Of course, market forces limit the price that the insurers can charge the consumers before they switch to another plan. After the reform was implemented, however, there was significant consolidation in the health insurance market and now there are only four or five large plans. This may reduce the amount of price competition in the market.

•The cost of health care is more transparent to consumers since they see the price they are charged for health care. In most national social health insurance programs, individuals do not know the value of health care they receive since the amount of money they pay into the system is proportional to their income and thus unrelated to actuarially fair value of health insurance.

•Health insurance is subsidized by the state.“Insurers get risk-equalization payments for patients with about 30 major diseases.” Thus, people who are sicker receive a larger state subsidy than healthy individuals.

“ecrasez l'infame”

Since: May 08

Atlanta, Georgia

#995 May 25, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
I never said that EMR was a bad idea. I just said I didn't want to pay for it. If the US wants my patients' charts digitalized, then the US can provide the necessary hardware, software and support services. And they can assume liability for safeguarding the data from hackers.
To those who feel that their doctor should absorb this substantial cost, well, some undoubtedly will. Others will merely pack their possessions, close their offices, say, "Adios, amigos!" and find a better way to enjoy their savings (clicks margarita glass).
Yeah. The U.S. government also expects you to see patients in hospitals. Should they be responsible for buying you a car too? EMR is a technological investment in your business. That's what businesses do. That's the purpose of retained earnings.

Seriously, most private practices really have no comprehension of how to run a business -- retained earnings, breakeven analysis, quantitative linear analysis,...

If a doctor wants to run a business called a private practice, then the doctor must take responsibility for their business. If the doctor is unwilling or unable to do this, he/she should work for Kaiser or somebody who does understand business.

UNTIL doctors understand business, nothing can change.

Did you ever have any idea how much it actually cost you to perform any given procedure (total cost - overhead, staff time, building cost, your time, risk, etc.)? If you don't understand your cost for CPT-99213 (middle difficulty office visit, existing patient), how can you know what your margin is for any reimbursement contract?

How can you negotiate other than saying "I don't know what my costs are, but whatever I get paid isn't enough." I don't know what your specialty was, but let me guess -- your salary & bonuses totaled somewhere between $200k and $300k per year, before taxes?

“Life may be sweeter for this”

Since: Nov 08

Fennario

#996 May 25, 2010
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>
[7] Did you know that Medicaid requires doctors to provide interpreters for their deaf and non-English speaking patients at the doctors own expense, one which far exceeds the amount that Medicaid will pay him? http://www.facebook.com/note.php...
Hedonist wrote:
Not true (yet). But will require close monitoring.
What do you mean not true yet? Did you read the article?:

"A New Jersey trial judge on March 10 upheld a $400,000 jury award in a discrimination claim against a doctor who refused to pay for a sign language interpreter at a deaf patient's request. The doctor had treated the patient for nearly two years, relying on written notes and the patient's family members. The award -- half of it in punitive damages -- is believed to be the largest of its kind. The court also tacked on attorney's fees, bringing total damages to $635,000."

Medicaid already requires that the physician provide a translator (or someone to sign, in the case of the deaf). This physician was already sued and lost to the tune of over $600,000, which included punitive damages. Punitive damages. Read the article and tell me why that physician's actions were so egregious that they required that a lesson be taught, which is what punitive damages if for.

So what did you mean by "Not true (yet)"?

Once again - I like you and want to stay friendly with you. So, it is with some reluctance that I say with some dissatisfaction here that your reaction to my post seems emblematic to me of some of the source of my professional frustration. Nobody's listening, even somebody like yourself who works as a physician advocate.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

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Atheism Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Atheism requires as much faith as religion? (Jul '09) 11 min Uncle Sam 243,460
News Atheists Aren't the Problem, Christian Intolera... (Oct '14) 2 hr USaWarringIdiotSo... 9,438
News "Science vs. Religion: What Scientists Really T... (Jan '12) 12 hr Brian_G 19,796
News Aliens and evolution (Jun '12) 17 hr thetruth 6,221
News Atheism must be about more than just not believ... Sat Amused 2
Should atheists have the burden of proof? Sat thetruth 38
News Founders created secular nation (Jul '10) Sat knight of Jesus 521
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