In America, atheists are still in the closet

Apr 11, 2012 Full story: Spiked 47,724

So do many other interest and identity groups. Complaint is our political lingua franca: it's what Occupiers, Tea Partiers, Wall Street titans, religious and irreligious people share.

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Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46231 Jan 14, 2013
SupaAFC wrote:
It is impossible to answer your question without being plain false. If someone answers yes, then it neglects the fact that we have a Parliamentary system of government
Are there one hundred pennies in a dollar, yes or no?

The answer is yes.

I don't have to describe the dates on the pennies, I don't have to tell you that the 1943 penny is made mostly of steel instead of copper.

The answer is yes.

The complete answer needed to be true is: yes.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46232 Jan 14, 2013
SupaAFC wrote:
And I see that in all your posts you responded with, none of them remotely attempted to explain what a democracy contains.
I don't give you my recipe for slow crock bread pudding either and it is possibly the best in the world.

Do you deny the United Kingdom is a monarchy, yes or no?

“There is no god!”

Since: Jun 12

Sweden

#46233 Jan 14, 2013
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
HAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH !
I guess that heavy dose of male DNA you swallow softens the brain cells.
Is the UK a monarchy, yes or no?
Ask Packy.
a democracy

“There is no god!”

Since: Jun 12

Sweden

#46234 Jan 14, 2013
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
You are a liar.
It started with you insisting the Americans didn't capture an enigma- which I disproved- and you being confused about the U505 being captured by Americans- which I proved- while you insisting I was "confused" by a movie that I had never seen with you being confused about it being a FICTIONAL movie rather than a documentary... with you insisting the first enigma machine was from the U110- which I disproved- with you then insisting it was the first "working" enigma, which of course is still nonsense.
Americans didn't capture the first enigma
Thinking

Leighton Buzzard, UK

#46235 Jan 14, 2013
I always thought we got the first one from some brave Polish people, even before the Royal Navy got one. Is that the case?
Mikko wrote:
<quoted text>
Americans didn't capture the first enigma
Lincoln

United States

#46236 Jan 14, 2013
Thinking wrote:
I always thought we got the first one from some brave Polish people, even before the Royal Navy got one. Is that the case?
<quoted text>
Poland cracked the code, gave it to the French and when France fell in 1940 to the British.
Thinking

Leighton Buzzard, UK

#46237 Jan 14, 2013
Sources?
Lincoln wrote:
<quoted text>
Poland cracked the code, gave it to the French and when France fell in 1940 to the British.
Lincoln

United States

#46238 Jan 14, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Sources?
<quoted text>
any of nine books on Enigma.

However, decades after Nazi Germany's Enigma code was first cracked, Poland has gone on the offensive to reclaim the glory of a cryptological success it feels has been unjustly claimed by Britain.

Frustrated at watching the achievements of the British wartime code breakers at Bletchley Park lauded while those of Poles go overlooked, Poland's parliament has launched a campaign to "restore justice" to the Polish men and women who first broke the Enigma codes.
Hailed as "heroes" in the resolution, Rejewski, Rozycki and Zygalski worked at the Polish Cipher Bureau in the early 1930s, and in late 1932 came up with three methods for breaking the encrypted codes produced on the Enigma machine, which the Germans thought were unbreakable.

Historians believe that the Allies' ability to eavesdrop in on German coded communications helped shorten the war in Europe. But much to Polish frustration the work of British cryptologists at Bletchley Park, including Alan Turing who would go on to pioneer early computers, has since attracted most of the credit.

"In both popular literature and official information the public was told that the breaking of the Enigma codes was due to the work of the British intelligence services to the complete omission of the work of Polish scientists," reads the resolution.

The 2001 film Enigma, in particular, ruffled Polish feathers. The British production starring Kate Winslet and set in Bletchley Park made little mention of the Polish contribution to cracking the codes, and rubbed salt into the wounds by depicting the only Pole in the film as a traitor.

"This resolution restores justice," said Jan Rulewski, a senator from the governing Civic Platform party. "Not only did the Western Allies marginalise the achievements of Polish cryptographers, but the Soviets did the same. They were silent about the Polish contribution to saving the lives of hundreds of thousands of troops fighting on all fronts."

At a meeting outside Warsaw in July 1939, just weeks before the start of the Second World War, the Poles passed on the secrets of the Enigma codes to British and French intelligence officers, and handed over Polish-made replicas of Enigma machines.

The British went on develop their own core of elite cryptographers based at Bletchley Park, and while the Germans constantly added layers of complexity to their Enigma codes the principles discovered by the Poles still applied.
"We have a duty to remind people just what the Polish cryptologists did," said Senator Piotr Zientarski.

The campaign to garner greater recognition for the Polish code breakers reflects a more widespread annoyance in Poland over how the country's contribution to the defeat of Nazi Germany has often been overlooked or downplayed in post-war accounts.

Polish pilots had the highest kill rates in the Battle of Britain, Polish troops fought in the North African, Italian and Normandy campaigns, and were involved in the Battle for Berlin.

Despite their efforts, a British desire to appease Stalin meant that Polish forces, still under the command of Poland's independent government in exile, were banned from taking part in official V-E Day celebrations.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46240 Jan 14, 2013
Mikko wrote:
<quoted text>
Americans didn't capture the first enigma
Didn't say they did.

You keep working on your English, Meatball.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46241 Jan 14, 2013
Thinking wrote:
I always thought we got the first one from some brave Polish people,
Nope.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46242 Jan 14, 2013
"The 2001 film Enigma, in particular, ruffled Polish feathers. The British production starring Kate Winslet and set in Bletchley Park made little mention of the Polish contribution to cracking the codes, and rubbed salt into the wounds by depicting the only Pole in the film as a traitor."

Of course, Skanque had a royal fit when an American FICTIONAL film portrayed the captured of a German submarine based loosely on U110 (and U505) as being captured by Americans.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46243 Jan 14, 2013
Mikko wrote:
<quoted text>
Americans didn't capture the first enigma
Of course, Mikko will insist I said so.
brown eyes

Hardy, VA

#46244 Jan 14, 2013
Message showed AlQaeda changing clothes fast when investigators got too close dressed as American actors. GF008 Safer World 2013 Actors Guild check membership for foreign members. GF008 Safer World 2013
Thinking

Leighton Buzzard, UK

#46245 Jan 14, 2013
You do realise Enigma machines were altered all the time, don't you?
Lincoln wrote:
<quoted text>
any of nine books on Enigma.
However, decades after Nazi Germany's Enigma code was first cracked, Poland has gone on the offensive to reclaim the glory of a cryptological success it feels has been unjustly claimed by Britain.
Frustrated at watching the achievements of the British wartime code breakers at Bletchley Park lauded while those of Poles go overlooked, Poland's parliament has launched a campaign to "restore justice" to the Polish men and women who first broke the Enigma codes.
Hailed as "heroes" in the resolution, Rejewski, Rozycki and Zygalski worked at the Polish Cipher Bureau in the early 1930s, and in late 1932 came up with three methods for breaking the encrypted codes produced on the Enigma machine, which the Germans thought were unbreakable.
Historians believe that the Allies' ability to eavesdrop in on German coded communications helped shorten the war in Europe. But much to Polish frustration the work of British cryptologists at Bletchley Park, including Alan Turing who would go on to pioneer early computers, has since attracted most of the credit.
"In both popular literature and official information the public was told that the breaking of the Enigma codes was due to the work of the British intelligence services to the complete omission of the work of Polish scientists," reads the resolution.
The 2001 film Enigma, in particular, ruffled Polish feathers. The British production starring Kate Winslet and set in Bletchley Park made little mention of the Polish contribution to cracking the codes, and rubbed salt into the wounds by depicting the only Pole in the film as a traitor.
"This resolution restores justice," said Jan Rulewski, a senator from the governing Civic Platform party. "Not only did the Western Allies marginalise the achievements of Polish cryptographers, but the Soviets did the same. They were silent about the Polish contribution to saving the lives of hundreds of thousands of troops fighting on all fronts."
At a meeting outside Warsaw in July 1939, just weeks before the start of the Second World War, the Poles passed on the secrets of the Enigma codes to British and French intelligence officers, and handed over Polish-made replicas of Enigma machines.
The British went on develop their own core of elite cryptographers based at Bletchley Park, and while the Germans constantly added layers of complexity to their Enigma codes the principles discovered by the Poles still applied.
"We have a duty to remind people just what the Polish cryptologists did," said Senator Piotr Zientarski.
The campaign to garner greater recognition for the Polish code breakers reflects a more widespread annoyance in Poland over how the country's contribution to the defeat of Nazi Germany has often been overlooked or downplayed in post-war accounts.
Polish pilots had the highest kill rates in the Battle of Britain, Polish troops fought in the North African, Italian and Normandy campaigns, and were involved in the Battle for Berlin.
Despite their efforts, a British desire to appease Stalin meant that Polish forces, still under the command of Poland's independent government in exile, were banned from taking part in official V-E Day celebrations.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46246 Jan 14, 2013
Thinking wrote:
You do realise Enigma machines were altered all the time, don't you?
<quoted text>
You realize that you cannot alter time?

That there are events that you cannot change just because they don't fall in line with whatever argument your current alias is trying to make?

The English like to believe they won the war with very little help and this is the narrative they push- hence, when they are told that the Polish contributed significantly to breaking the code and that the Americans did capture the U505 just as I said, and that Americans sent over 4 million soldiers at the end of WWI, it never seems to come up in the English, how we won the war narrative.

Funny how that is...
Lincoln

United States

#46247 Jan 14, 2013
Thinking wrote:
You do realise Enigma machines were altered all the time, don't you?
<quoted text>
Yes!
SupaAFC

Leeds, UK

#46248 Jan 14, 2013
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
It doesn't.
Is the UK a monarchy, yes or no?
I gave you my response months ago.
Funny how you can do it.
Of course it does. Why do you think social science exists if everything written and done by man were in simple black-and-white terms? If Britain were a monarchy then you have to explain:

why we have a Parliament;

why Elizabeth uses her powers in accordance to institutional ogligations rather than on her own whim;

why people here, if we are so undemocratic, are not protesting and demanding overthrow of the monarchy.

Three examples of many, many questions that honest people can answer, but you cannot.

That is why it is not worth lying, little boy.
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't give you my recipe for slow crock bread pudding either and it is possibly the best in the world.
Do you deny the United Kingdom is a monarchy, yes or no?
I know why you refused to define democracy: because it would prevent you from being able to duck, dodge and play word games.

You love to throw us the dictionary when it comes to monarchy, but refuse to do so with democracy. Isn't that a surprise?

Lie some more, little boy.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46249 Jan 14, 2013
SupaAFC wrote:
If Britain were a monarchy then you have to explain:
I'd have to prove that the United Kingdom had a form of government with a monarch at the head.

Queen Elizabeth...

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46250 Jan 14, 2013
SupaAFC wrote:
why we have a Parliament;
Nope. Don't care.

Do you deny the United Kingdom is a monarchy, yes or no?

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#46251 Jan 14, 2013
SupaAFC wrote:
why Elizabeth uses her powers in accordance to institutional ogligations
ogligations, dear SuperFAG?

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