Don't dictate beliefs

Sep 5, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: The Star Press

No one else can say otherwise? That is basically saying those who do "believe in God" are better? Hardly.

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KJV

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#2345
Oct 5, 2012
 
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>Any supreme being who thinks that Pi = 3 isn't for real.
"1 Kings 7:26
And it was a handbreadth thick; and the brim thereof was wrought like the brim of a cup, like the flower of a lily; it held two thousand baths.

This suggests that the bowl was not paper-thin; it was a handbreadth thick. My dictionary simply defines a "handbreadth" as "the breadth of the hand - from 2 1/2 to 4 inches." I measured my own handbreadth - thumb to pinky with the hand laid flat, measured perpendicular to the arm - this is also hard to measure, made even harder by how tightly I place my fingers next to each other, but mine is about 4 inches.

But what if the circumference had been measured from the inside of the bowl, and the diameter from outside? Then the diameter of the inside is 10 cubits minus two handbreadths. Using my measurements, the circumference is 30 cubits times 18.5 inches per cubit equals 555 inches, the diameter of the inside is 177 inches: 185 inches (10 cubits times 18.5 inches) minus 8 inches for the two handbreadths. In this case Circumference / Diameter = 555 / 177 = 3.135593 (which is itself rounded), but this is much closer to what we think of us as the true value of pi."

http://jerry.praxisiimath.com/pi.html
KJV

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#2346
Oct 5, 2012
 
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>Stop talking to yourself.
derek4,

Did you know that you and me and Langoliers are the same person!!

I guess we're the holy trinity!!

LOL you can't make it up!

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#2347
Oct 5, 2012
 
From: The British Journal of Psychiatry

How reliable are scientific studies?

Summary
There is growing concern that a substantial proportion of scientific research may in fact be false. A number of factors have been proposed as contributing to the presence of a large number of false-positive results in the literature, one of which is publication bias. We discuss empirical evidence for these factors.

continued:
http://www.google.com/url...

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#2348
Oct 5, 2012
 
From: Discover Magazine

Why Scientific Studies Are So Often Wrong: The Streetlight Effect

Researchers tend to look for answers where the looking is good, rather than where the answers are likely to be hiding.

A bolt of excitement ran through the field of cardiology in the early 1980s when anti-arrhythmia drugs burst onto the scene. Researchers knew that heart-attack victims with steady heartbeats had the best odds of survival, so a medication that could tamp down irregularities seemed like a no-brainer. The drugs became the standard of care for heart-attack patients and were soon smoothing out heartbeats in intensive care wards across the United States.

But in the early 1990s, cardiologists realized that the drugs were also doing something else: killing about 56,000 heart-attack patients a year. Yes, hearts were beating more regularly on the drugs than off, but their owners were, on average, one-third as likely to pull through. Cardiologists had been so focused on immediately measurable arrhythmias that they had overlooked the longer-term but far more important variable of death.

The fundamental error here is summed up in an old joke scientists love to tell. Late at night, a police officer finds a drunk man crawling around on his hands and knees under a streetlight. The drunk man tells the officer he’s looking for his wallet. When the officer asks if he’s sure this is where he dropped the wallet, the man replies that he thinks he more likely dropped it across the street. Then why are you looking over here? the befuddled officer asks. Because the light’s better here, explains the drunk man.
http://discovermagazine.com/2010/jul-aug/29-w...

Since: Jul 08

Columbus, OH

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#2349
Oct 5, 2012
 
derek4 wrote:
From: The British Journal of Psychiatry
How reliable are scientific studies?
Summary
There is growing concern that a substantial proportion of scientific research may in fact be false. A number of factors have been proposed as contributing to the presence of a large number of false-positive results in the literature, one of which is publication bias. We discuss empirical evidence for these factors.
continued:
http://www.google.com/url...
And ancient myths are more reliable how, dummy?

Since: Jul 08

Columbus, OH

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#2350
Oct 5, 2012
 
derek4 wrote:
From: Discover Magazine
Why Scientific Studies Are So Often Wrong: The Streetlight Effect
Researchers tend to look for answers where the looking is good, rather than where the answers are likely to be hiding.
A bolt of excitement ran through the field of cardiology in the early 1980s when anti-arrhythmia drugs burst onto the scene. Researchers knew that heart-attack victims with steady heartbeats had the best odds of survival, so a medication that could tamp down irregularities seemed like a no-brainer. The drugs became the standard of care for heart-attack patients and were soon smoothing out heartbeats in intensive care wards across the United States.
But in the early 1990s, cardiologists realized that the drugs were also doing something else: killing about 56,000 heart-attack patients a year. Yes, hearts were beating more regularly on the drugs than off, but their owners were, on average, one-third as likely to pull through. Cardiologists had been so focused on immediately measurable arrhythmias that they had overlooked the longer-term but far more important variable of death.
The fundamental error here is summed up in an old joke scientists love to tell. Late at night, a police officer finds a drunk man crawling around on his hands and knees under a streetlight. The drunk man tells the officer he’s looking for his wallet. When the officer asks if he’s sure this is where he dropped the wallet, the man replies that he thinks he more likely dropped it across the street. Then why are you looking over here? the befuddled officer asks. Because the light’s better here, explains the drunk man.
http://discovermagazine.com/2010/jul-aug/29-w...
And ancient myths are so reliable, right?

Dummy.

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#2351
Oct 5, 2012
 
KJV wrote:
<quoted text>
derek4,
Did you know that you and me and Langoliers are the same person!!
I guess we're the holy trinity!!
LOL you can't make it up!
All 3 the same person? Where is the evidence?

I'm in Dallas, TX, as I've posted many times in here...

KJV in Elmhurst, IL, I think it shows.

Don't know where you are, but you came in much later on than I did, and after KJV.

They try anything, don't they? Or is it "they" - maybe there is only ONE atheist in here, lol.

Since: Jul 08

Columbus, OH

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#2352
Oct 5, 2012
 
KJV wrote:
<quoted text>
derek4,
Did you know that you and me and Langoliers are the same person!!
I guess we're the holy trinity!!
LOL you can't make it up!
Christians often confuse themselves with their deity.

Odd, huh?

Hey, you still stealing bad apologetics?

Since: Jul 08

Columbus, OH

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#2353
Oct 5, 2012
 
derek4 wrote:
<quoted text>
....
They try anything, don't they?....
Grammatically incorrect projection.

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#2354
Oct 5, 2012
 
Chess Jurist wrote:
<quoted text>
And ancient myths are more reliable how, dummy?
“Often a cold shudder has run through me, and I have asked myself whether I may have not devoted myself to a fantasy.”
Charles Darwin

"My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble mind."
Einstein

“Every one who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a Spirit is manifest in the laws of the universe – a Spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble. In this way the pursuit of science leads to a religious feeling of a special sort, which is indeed quite different from the religiosity of someone more naive.”
...Einstein 1936, as cited in Dukas and Hoffmann, Albert Einstein: The Human Side, Princeton University Press, 1979, 33

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#2355
Oct 5, 2012
 
Chess Jurist wrote:
<quoted text>
And ancient myths are so reliable, right?
Dummy.
Ancient myths are most unreliable. I throw them out the same as I do all the fraudulent science I've posted for the past month.

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#2356
Oct 5, 2012
 
Chess Jurist wrote:
<quoted text>
Grammatically incorrect projection.
You study grammar, and I'll stick with the weightier issue of fraudulent science and scientific misconduct which I find more interesting. It's been most enlightening.

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#2357
Oct 5, 2012
 
We cannot ... measure whether there is more (or less) fraud in science today than in previous eras because of both insufficient quantitative data and inherent inconsistencies in how misconduct has been defined. Only a few sensational episodes of scientific fraud are well documented; many, such as the Piltdown skull forgery, remain a mystery. Allegations often survive only in participants' memories or departmental gossip; formal records may not exist or may be locked in confidential personnel files. Few of the people caught up in these cases, whether accused, accuser, or investigator, have been willing or able to be interviewed by social scientists. The most comprehensive details on recent cases have been contained in news reports (which vary widely in accuracy and credibility) or the sanitized announcements from government investigatory agencies.
http://ebm.rsmjournals.com/content/224/4/211....
KJV

Chicago Ridge, IL

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#2358
Oct 5, 2012
 
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>I don't believe it.

However, xtians do.

This of course means that they deeply love all the killings that the Bible says their god has carried out.
No it doesn't

Dolt warning.
KJV

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#2359
Oct 5, 2012
 
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>You're another sock.

It shows the paucity of your arguments when you feel you have to use so many socks to support them.
Atheist well always try the old sidetrack tool when getting clobbered!

Right now Khatru is just kindling wood.

It's about time for him to bail out to a different thread. He does not like getting whittled down to size.
KJV

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#2360
Oct 5, 2012
 
It aint necessarily so wrote:
<quoted text>Your post confirmed his:

His post: "3500 — 4000 churches close their doors each year."
Your post: "3500 churches will close their doors"
Really, you think that's the same?

One post 3500 to 4000 churches close down every year.

The other says about 4000 new churches open ever year while about 3500 close leaving a GROWTH of 500 churches.

His post was saying last nights football score was 24 to 9 Raiders! While the finale score was 24 to 30 Packers.

Posting the half time score as if it was the finale score is as miss leading as an all out lie.
KJV

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#2361
Oct 5, 2012
 
Chess Jurist wrote:
<quoted text>And ancient myths are more reliable how, dummy?
http://www.reasons.org/articles/articles/fulf...

"Unique among all books ever written, the Bible accurately foretells specific events-in detail-many years, sometimes centuries, before they occur. Approximately 2500 prophecies appear in the pages of the Bible, about 2000 of which already have been fulfilled to the letter—no errors."
KJV

Chicago Ridge, IL

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#2362
Oct 5, 2012
 
Chess Jurist wrote:
<quoted text>And ancient myths are so reliable, right?

Dummy.
"Unique among all books ever written, the Bible accurately foretells specific events-in detail-many years, sometimes centuries, before they occur. Approximately 2500 prophecies appear in the pages of the Bible, about 2000 of which already have been fulfilled to the letter—no errors."

http://www.reasons.org/articles/articles/fulf...
KJV

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#2363
Oct 5, 2012
 
derek4 wrote:
<quoted text>All 3 the same person? Where is the evidence?

I'm in Dallas, TX, as I've posted many times in here...

KJV in Elmhurst, IL, I think it shows.

Don't know where you are, but you came in much later on than I did, and after KJV.

They try anything, don't they? Or is it "they" - maybe there is only ONE atheist in here, lol.
They use tactic like this to side track when they're getting their azzes handed to them. LOL
KJV

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#2364
Oct 5, 2012
 
Chess Jurist wrote:
<quoted text>Christians often confuse themselves with their deity.

Odd, huh?

Hey, you still stealing bad apologetics?
Yup! Selling them too!

What wimpy Dolt you are!

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