Why Do Atheists Ridicule Christianity?

Why Do Atheists Ridicule Christianity?

There are 9880 comments on the Free Republic story from May 5, 2011, titled Why Do Atheists Ridicule Christianity?. In it, Free Republic reports that:

'RELIGION SHOULD BE TREATED WITH RIDICULE, HATRED AND CONTEMPT' Atheism, or 'antitheism,' which was once considered taboo in America, has gone somewhat mainstream in today's society.

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“Right click Left click Yay!”

Since: Dec 10

Nehwon

#6568 Dec 3, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
I have heard this one previously, and I've seen the response by folk who really do understand quantum mechanics.
The answer they gave is essentially that we *do* have a pretty good grasp of QM, and one of it's fundamental properties is that at the quantum mechanical level, the universe is both chaotic, random and uncaused.
All at the same time.
There is no real debate about that, among the scientists who are studying this stuff at it's bleeding edge. Nor among the scientists who are trying to develop experimental proof about qm (those lovely men and women who operate the super collider).
So the argument that the universe is a "massive, clockwork machine" is fundamentally false.
Furthermore, from chaos, patterns *can* emerge. I cannot describe it eloquently, but I've been told this from people who's expertise is both statistics and chaos theory. I'll take their word for it, I suppose.
And it appears that our universe is such a thing: an emergent pattern on top of what is basically a chaotic foundation.
What will be interesting to see is how religion incorporates this knowledge into their myths...

It might go like this...

And Lo, so it came to pass, that Koresh, descendant of David, the King of Kings under The Lord*, received a blessing so that every atom would align with the Temple wall.

Six tries at the wall did he fail and suffered grievous injury by Satan repelling him.

But on the 7th try, with great faith in God*, did he pass through that wall.

And The Lord* grinned and saith - Koresh, never play the Powerball lottery for thy has used up all your luck for every drawing until the end of time to perform the miracle I have granted you here today.

And the witnesses were astonished that Koresh's luck held out that he completely passed through the wall and did not get stuck half way between.

*Note: "The Lord" and "God" are not not synonymous in the Old Testament.

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LCNLin

United States

#6569 Dec 3, 2013
emperorjohn wrote:
<quoted text>
Our philosophy is simple. You have to prove that your god exists, case closed.
"Simple philosophy" is a fine beginning to your education.

You close the case on philosophical speculation in a Simple manner?

The great issues may not be as Simple as "case closed"?

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“I started out with nothing”

Since: Nov 10

and still got most of it left

#6570 Dec 3, 2013
RHill wrote:
The above post got me to lamenting the lack of programming in BASIC on modern computers. This led me to this " http://smallbasic.com/" ; ... programming is ALIVE AND WELL and free for the taking!!! Now all I need is the time to learn a new language. BASIC ain't what it used to be ...
There are several Basic interpreters and compilers, some are more flexible than the smallbasic offering and some are even recognisable as the early basic languages we all know and used to love but with the addition of windows commands.

Take a look at
http://www.thefreecountry.com/compilers/basic...
Caped Mystical Crusader

Clearlake, CA

#6571 Dec 3, 2013
Enough of all these insults!

Why don't we all jus settle down and listen to some nice inspirational music?

This should appeal to everyone but the froth at the mouth religious fanatics:



Don't forget to watch part two!

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6572 Dec 3, 2013
greymouser wrote:
<quoted text>
What will be interesting to see is how religion incorporates this knowledge into their myths...
It might go like this...
And Lo, so it came to pass, that Koresh, descendant of David, the King of Kings under The Lord*, received a blessing so that every atom would align with the Temple wall.
Six tries at the wall did he fail and suffered grievous injury by Satan repelling him.
But on the 7th try, with great faith in God*, did he pass through that wall.
And The Lord* grinned and saith - Koresh, never play the Powerball lottery for thy has used up all your luck for every drawing until the end of time to perform the miracle I have granted you here today.
And the witnesses were astonished that Koresh's luck held out that he completely passed through the wall and did not get stuck half way between.
*Note: "The Lord" and "God" are not not synonymous in the Old Testament.
LOL!

If only there were a universal symbol for chaos--- I've no doubt they would use it as a religious icon.

LOL!

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“Blue Collar Philosopher”

Since: Nov 08

Texas, USA

#6574 Dec 3, 2013
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
There are several Basic interpreters and compilers, some are more flexible than the smallbasic offering and some are even recognisable as the early basic languages we all know and used to love but with the addition of windows commands.
Take a look at
http://www.thefreecountry.com/compilers/basic...
Jeepers! That's a lot of BASIC!! I'll check some out ... need to retire to have time for programming. I remember many sweaty, smoke filled all-nighters debugging. Dabbled in some Z80 assembly language back when microprocessors were still understandable by mortal man. Thanks!

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6575 Dec 3, 2013
Crystal_Clear wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm commenting on something from Sunday - I like the post that your comment was based on. With or without statistics if you have an infinite amount of possibilities then patterns would surely exist.
Yes indeed.

A friend of mine, who has a masters in math, was discussing this with me once, and he said that in math, you can prove that with an infinite set, you can prove that patterns will exist within the set.

The maths involved were over my head, but it does make sense.

What this means in the greater scheme of things? I do not know.

:)

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“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6576 Dec 3, 2013
RHill wrote:
<quoted text>
Jeepers! That's a lot of BASIC!! I'll check some out ... need to retire to have time for programming. I remember many sweaty, smoke filled all-nighters debugging. Dabbled in some Z80 assembly language back when microprocessors were still understandable by mortal man. Thanks!
I spent 17 years programming basic, and moved from the original DOS 1.0 version up until the last compiler-driven one, called "professional development system 7.x" which was still DOS-based, but pretty complicated basic for all of that.

The next set of basic language I went to was called Visual basic, and I forget how high I went in that one-- I purchased each version as it came out too.$300-400 a pop, not cheap. The last one was 6? 7? I don't recall.

I also spent a couple of years doing the basic-macro language that was originally built into the Office suites-- the last of those was Office 20000 (which I finally quit using in 2004-ish).

So I'm way-way behind, now-- that was over 10 years back, now.

I loved basic-- it was nearly self-documenting, and with a reasonable comment regimen? It *was* self documenting.

Of course, I worked with my Dad at the time, and we had all sorts of global code-writing conventions, including variable naming and so on. We always required every variable to be declared.

Otherwise, debugging becomes a nightmare...

... but I had written so many debugging tools for it too...

... heh. Those were the days.

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“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6577 Dec 3, 2013
LOL!

I wrote "Office 20,000" (only without the comma)...

... LOL!

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“Sombrero Galaxy”

Since: Jan 10

I'm An Illegal Alien

#6578 Dec 3, 2013
LCNLin wrote:
<quoted text>
"Simple philosophy" is a fine beginning to your education.
You close the case on philosophical speculation in a Simple manner?
The great issues may not be as Simple as "case closed"?
You have some temerity to speak when you belief is "Zap, God did it." The fact remains that neither you or your friends have proven a god and all evidence argues there being a deity.

“Blue Collar Philosopher”

Since: Nov 08

Texas, USA

#6579 Dec 4, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
I spent 17 years programming basic, and moved from the original DOS 1.0 version up until the last compiler-driven one, called "professional development system 7.x" which was still DOS-based, but pretty complicated basic for all of that.
The next set of basic language I went to was called Visual basic, and I forget how high I went in that one-- I purchased each version as it came out too.$300-400 a pop, not cheap. The last one was 6? 7? I don't recall.
I also spent a couple of years doing the basic-macro language that was originally built into the Office suites-- the last of those was Office 20000 (which I finally quit using in 2004-ish).
So I'm way-way behind, now-- that was over 10 years back, now.
I loved basic-- it was nearly self-documenting, and with a reasonable comment regimen? It *was* self documenting.
Of course, I worked with my Dad at the time, and we had all sorts of global code-writing conventions, incl. uding variable naming and so on. We always required every variable to be declared.
Otherwise, debugging becomes a nightmare...
... but I had written so many debugging tools for it too...
... heh. Those were the days.
You're the real deal, I was just a hobbyist. The "Trash-80" was supported by a massive publication called "TRS-80 Microcomputing", which was "massive" due to all the BASIC code published for our enjoyment in little, tiny print. Most of my "debugging" was due to my own typos. Still, I found it exciting and educational. My first printer, which I paid like $800 for, made the task somewhat easier. Later, I bought a graphics add-on PCB, upgrading the machine's native 140x48 pixel resolution to a whopping 640x480!! I was poop'n in high cotton with my new 80 column display and converted green-phosphor CRT (the Trash-80 came with a B/W display). I then enthusiastically set about modifying all my various programs to utilize my new, amazing graphics capabilities. It was a lot of fun, but not particularly "creative" in the sense 'real' programmers experience. Even so, there's not much my little 48K of free RAM couldn't do that that modern machines can ... I had quite functional word processors, spreadsheets, terminal emulators and, of course, Flight Sims and the requisite Star Trek games. One stormy night, a huge lightning strike travelled down the phone lines, exploding my expensive 300 baud MODEM and turning my beloved and heavily modified Trash-80 into real trash. Lord knows I tried to save her, replacing the obviously fried IC's and stuff. No joy. I had to relegate her beloved remains to the dumpster. Brief and unsatisfying affairs began with the New Kids in Town. Commodore64, Atari 800, VIC-20, Amiga500 ... I had them all ... I was a computer Whore and I knew it, but couldn't seem to control it. Eventually, I settled into Big Blue and have been hacking, buying, begging and stealing components ever since. They're never quite fast enough to give me the stutter-free flight-sim experience I so desperately need. And so it goes ...

“Blue Collar Philosopher”

Since: Nov 08

Texas, USA

#6580 Dec 4, 2013
Forgive me. I typed the above with a glaring eye and dirty fingernail on my smartphone, after my barking dog wrenched me from a sound sleep. I GIVE UP DOG!!! You have robbed me of my rest and now my friends and many admirers on the Internet must suffer the consequences!

You may notice that the word "Apple" is missing from the above soliloquy. It's true, I have never eaten from the Apple tree. Don't get me wrong! They are fine machines and I have often gazed with an envious eye upon their amazing capabilities. I think it's because they do 'out of the box' what I have always had to FORCE my lessor machines to do with shear grit and determination. It's been part of the 'fun'.

I think I would be a far different man had I simply eaten of the Apple. Far less bitter, far more at peace with myself and the world. What an odd dichotomy to Eve's experiment with that innocent fruit.

Oh, the pain ... OH, THE HUMANITY!!!

“Blue Collar Philosopher”

Since: Nov 08

Texas, USA

#6581 Dec 4, 2013
The Internet is such a remarkable place. Look at this ... a copy of an issue of "80 Microcomputing" (Not TRS-80 Microcomputing as my imperfect memory recalled)...

" https://archive.org/stream/80-microcomputing-... ;

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6582 Dec 4, 2013
RHill wrote:
<quoted text>
You're the real deal, I was just a hobbyist. The "Trash-80" was supported by a massive publication called "TRS-80 Microcomputing", which was "massive" due to all the BASIC code published for our enjoyment in little, tiny print. Most of my "debugging" was due to my own typos. Still, I found it exciting and educational....<edited for space>... beloved remains to the dumpster. Brief and unsatisfying affairs began with the New Kids in Town. Commodore64, Atari 800, VIC-20, Amiga500 ... I had them all ... I was a computer Whore and I knew it, but couldn't seem to control it. Eventually, I settled into Big Blue and have been hacking, buying, begging and stealing components ever since. They're never quite fast enough to give me the stutter-free flight-sim experience I so desperately need. And so it goes ...
Your experience is similar to any number of folk. Alas, poor TR-80, lightning was not it's friend.:)

My dad and I started our business in about 1981-ish, and he purchased 2 of the first IBM PC's that were available in Tulsa. I kept the cases for those for years, due to the low serial numbers on them-- they had long since been gutted & replaced with upgraded motherboards, etc. But the low serial numbers were amusing to own.

We also kept those original IBM keyboards for years and years-- they were wonderfully made things, with the "clicky" keys (giving a lovely tactile/audible feedback). These had only 10 function keys down the left side of the main keyboard, and a simple numeric keypad/cursor keyset running right off the main keys. All of one thing. I used to have one I had modified a wee bit, just for nostalgia-- it worked. I needed a black keyboard, so I took that one apart, cleaned up the **metal** housing with paint prep, carefully masked over the nice **metal** IBM labels, and painted it with quality automotive lacquer. Black, naturally. Then re-assemble and it was glorious. I eventually took that one home for my home PC (which was made *entirely* from cast-off/obsolete parts from my office/work one--cost me zip).

Oh those were the days. I remember the first hard drive-- not counting the external one my dad had for about a month*. It was a whopping 10 *megabytes* and noisy as heck. Full sized, or roughly 4 inches tall by 5 inches wide by 8-10 inches deep. A monster, and slooooooow (compared to later models). But held many-many floppies worth.

Do you remember the "boot floppy" syndrome? For several years, the BIOS didn't know from hard disks, and would only read the 0th sector in a floppy that *had* to be drive A. I had a whole series of boot floppies, each doing slightly different memory models, depending on what I was going to do that time.

....*sigh*

* That original hard drive my dad had? Just before I joined his adventure in computing, he had purchased an external "Winchester" drive, as they called them. It held about 5 meg or so. Louder than a turbine, and hotter than a toaster oven. About the size of a toaster oven too-- dad used to set his cold coffee cup (a ceramic one) on top, to warm it back up, it was *that* hot. Oh, you wouldn't burn your hands or anything, but you definitely didn't want to sit next to it-- but you had to, the ribbon cables were pretty short. Since DOS 1.0 didn't know hard drives from butterflies, it was partitioned into 7 or 8 virtual floppy drives at a whopping 360 meg a pop. Not very easy to manage.

We took that one back, traded it for a complete PC with one of IBM's first "graphic" cards--- a whopping 640 by 360 in 3 colors. LOL! The RAM for that card exceeded the RAM for the machine, I think. 2 bits per pixel it was. It had a "high color" mode with half the resolution and 8 colors? I forget--been years.

Ironically, your venerable Atari computer had better graphics.

:D

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“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6583 Dec 4, 2013
RHill wrote:
Forgive me. I typed the above with a glaring eye and dirty fingernail on my smartphone, after my barking dog wrenched me from a sound sleep. I GIVE UP DOG!!! You have robbed me of my rest and now my friends and many admirers on the Internet must suffer the consequences!
You may notice that the word "Apple" is missing from the above soliloquy. It's true, I have never eaten from the Apple tree. Don't get me wrong! They are fine machines and I have often gazed with an envious eye upon their amazing capabilities. I think it's because they do 'out of the box' what I have always had to FORCE my lessor machines to do with shear grit and determination. It's been part of the 'fun'.
I think I would be a far different man had I simply eaten of the Apple. Far less bitter, far more at peace with myself and the world. What an odd dichotomy to Eve's experiment with that innocent fruit.
Oh, the pain ... OH, THE HUMANITY!!!
I never owned an Apple for the simple reason that our software made *extensive* use of the secondary processor-- that separate chip known as the "numeric processor". We required our customers to purchase one, when they got their PC's. Apple's machines simply didn't have the number crunching we required.

By the time Apple caught up with the processor wars? The PC's were firmly entrenched, both in our cost outlay and experience.

One customer tried to get us to port our program to Apple, claiming they had fixed the weak number crunching abilities of the Apple. Perhaps they had, but what Apple lacked, was a BASIC compiler that included the various extensions we required. I got the materials, and carefully went over what they *did* offer, and it was something of a joke by that time. Late 1980's? Something like that.

By that time, I had written a couple of dozen ASSEMBLER modules we hooked in to via the BASIC external run library method. These little utilities did some very low level things *exactly* the way I wanted/needed them to. I would have had to rewrite them all, to match the CPU that apples used-- too time consuming, too costly a project for a company that was doing okay, but not doing super-rich.

We did okay-- we purchased homes for ourselves from that company, we kept ourselves in food and the occasional luxury.

I'd do it again, if I could.

Alas, I finally burned out of programming by the very late 1990's. My last gasp carried me into 2001-2002, before I looked elsewhere for work.

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“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6584 Dec 4, 2013
RHill wrote:
The Internet is such a remarkable place. Look at this ... a copy of an issue of "80 Microcomputing" (Not TRS-80 Microcomputing as my imperfect memory recalled)...
" https://archive.org/stream/80-microcomputing-... ;
What a hoot! That's too cool!

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“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6585 Dec 4, 2013
RHill wrote:
.... I had them all ... I was a computer Whore and I knew it, but couldn't seem to control it. Eventually, I settled into Big Blue and have been hacking, buying, begging and stealing components ever since. They're never quite fast enough to give me the stutter-free flight-sim experience I so desperately need. And so it goes ...
Oh, I built many a PC myself-- once I realized how easy it was to mix and match the hardware under the hood?

We never purchased a turn-key machine again-- I could get parts and build them, better, bigger and cheaper too.

We did stay with the Intel processors, though-- their math chip had a few specific functions (accessed via ASSEMBLER) that we made extensive use of for our program.

Eventually, we were able to scrap those (custom ASSEMBLY subroutines), as the AMD finally got up to speed-- and the numeric CPUs were built-in to the whole processor package.

What had happened at roughly the same time, is that the compiled BASIC finally caught up to the hardware-- and we could use the libraries that it came with for much of what was painstakingly made ASSEMBLY modules.

I still kept many of the fundamental routines, though-- I had built a lovely MENU system, that you loaded into character arrays the menu items, loaded into a number array the ASC codes for the keys you wished to tag, set any blank lines for spacing, etc, etc. Then, you simply called the MENU routine. It would patently wait for the user, then return an ASC code for which ever key he had pressed. If he was wanting to quit? It did that too--exiting back to DOS.

Oh, those days of carefully fine-tuning code to be robust, foolproof (mostly) and easy to use.

:)

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“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#6586 Dec 4, 2013
RHill wrote:
.... I had them all ... I was a computer Whore and I knew it, but couldn't seem to control it. Eventually, I settled into Big Blue and have been hacking, buying, begging and stealing components ever since. They're never quite fast enough to give me the stutter-free flight-sim experience I so desperately need. And so it goes ...
Flight Simulator. We had a copy of version 1.0, from IBM.

It would only run monochrome graphics (I seem to remember, maybe it would run that 320 by 200 mode? I don't remember)-- pretty crude. But kinda amazing for all that. I didn't play it much.

But I do understand the attraction-- I understand that Flight Simulator is still going strong, even today, and you can buy real-world packages that simulate actual, real-world airports.

Amazing.

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“Right click Left click Yay!”

Since: Dec 10

Nehwon

#6587 Dec 4, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL!
If only there were a universal symbol for chaos--- I've no doubt they would use it as a religious icon.
LOL!
Well, there is the symbol for KAOS but Maxwell Smart keeps them from being universal.

Now if you'll excuse me, I'm hopping in my time machine and heading to a bar in 1969.

Agent 99, Jeannie and Mary Ann are all at a table waiting for me to buy them a drink.

If I don't return, assume I've already ascended to heaven.

“Right click Left click Yay!”

Since: Dec 10

Nehwon

#6588 Dec 4, 2013
Dammit!

Why didn't anyone tell me Fabio had a time machine too?!?

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