Why Do Atheists Ridicule Christianity?

Why Do Atheists Ridicule Christianity?

There are 6130 comments on the Free Republic story from May 5, 2011, titled Why Do Atheists Ridicule Christianity?. In it, Free Republic reports that:

'RELIGION SHOULD BE TREATED WITH RIDICULE, HATRED AND CONTEMPT' Atheism, or 'antitheism,' which was once considered taboo in America, has gone somewhat mainstream in today's society.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Free Republic.

Imhotep

United States

#5581 Apr 21, 2013
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
You're right about the Chinese taking the long-long view.
If we in the west take a long look back at history in our part of the world we'll see a natural pattern of civilisations and empires rising and falling. By 2000 BC Egypt had eclipsed Sumeria. Fast forward 1000 years to see Egypt on the decline set against the rise of Babylon. Then came the Persians who were surpassed by the Greeks and then the Romans. Most civilisations were supplanted by another although some were totally destroyed and pretty much vanished from history.
Moving forward in time we saw the rise and fall of the Italian city states, the Spanish Empire, the Hapsburg Empire and then the British Empire. Now it's your turn in America but even now most Americans accept that their dominance won't last.
Our civilisations/empires are transitory and while revolution and civil war occur less frequently these days, they were a major contributing factor to making us the people we are.
Now take a look at China and you'll see an altogether different pattern:
The idea of younger, stronger civilisations succeeding older ones does not exist. In China it's the yin-yang thing where their civilisation passes through reversals of direction from disorder to order and back to disorder. It's a society where there has never been a revolution with the impact of the French/Russian or other revolutions. No Magna Carta establishing people's rights. Sure there have been plenty of dynastic changes but each dynasty would eventually become rotten and would be replaced by another.
Those changes always took place at the top and whatever happened, the power remained in the hands of one emperor and his officials, it's been an unending cycle of power changes. Ok, the Chinese have had revolutions but they have never really led to changes in the system. In China the course of their civilisation is like a line of descent with dynasties and rulers linked together like father and son. Just think of everything we get from our parents and how we are shaped and influenced by them. That is how Chinese civilisation is.
The checks and balances on our governments that we in the west now take for granted are unheard of in China. After over 5000 years of the same cycles of government it would take a truly momentous effort to overthrow the Chinese system. If it ever happens it will be an achievement that will easily dwarf any of our revolutionary victories.
Thank you for excellent post, mate
How much time did you spend in China?

As a system engineer I work with several Chinese SE's as well, They mirror pretty much what you just stated.

China proud China loud China rising!
Maybe I should learn Mandarin?

&#25152;&#20197;&# 24456;&#22810;&#24037; &#20316;&#35201;&# 20570;&#65292;&#36825; &#20040;&#30701;&# 30340;&#26102;&#38388;

;)

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#5582 Apr 21, 2013
Imhotep wrote:
<quoted text>
Is the for Forbidden city as beautiful is it appears in pictures or movie sets?
The Valley of the king tombs, IF you can tolerate the long walk and steps, is mesmerizing
Brilliant colors floor to ceiling
The stonework, the statues, just incredible
Honestly, the pyramids themselves and Sphinx while entertaining were nowhere near as compelling as Luxor.
Ramses II stamped his name everywhere in Egypt
, No Moses though! I believe he lived into his 90s and fathered probably 160 or more children from concubines... The tour guides love Ramses!
And questions to the tour guides about Moses and Ramses are really funny, Simply put the Egyptians don't recognize Moses, Either that or we Encountered seriously smart-ass guides. ;)
My recommendation if you travel nowhere else in your life this is one place you owe to yourself to see. ;)
Pompeii is another place that you can spend the whole day there and still not be satisfied
It's like walking back in time
You purchase a translator that explains different areas of the city that way you don't walk around and not be bothered with tour guides
The coliseum is positively eerie. Both my wife and I experienced the same cold feeling, of the smell of death yet the roar of pleasure from the crowd.
Silly I know but it occurred - we both mentioned it to one another on the cruise ship that evening.
I loved the Forbidden City! Especially the gardens. When I went, I started at the north end and worked my way south to Tiananmen Square. Although much of the city was inaccessible due to repairs being carried out there was still a lot to see.

Also worth a visit is Tiantan Park and the Temple of Heaven.

While I've been to Rome and Pompeii, I've not been to Egypt and it's on my agenda to go there at some point.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#5583 Apr 21, 2013
Imhotep wrote:
<quoted text>
Thank you for excellent post, mate
How much time did you spend in China?
As a system engineer I work with several Chinese SE's as well, They mirror pretty much what you just stated.
China proud China loud China rising!
Maybe I should learn Mandarin?
&#25152;&#20197;&# 24456;&#22810;&#24037; &#20316;&#35201;&# 20570;&#65292;&#36825; &#20040;&#30701;&# 30340;&#26102;&#38388;
;)
You're welcome!

If I was at school now, I'd want to learn Mandarin or Putonghua as it's known in China.

I spent five years in Hong Kong. Ok, I know that's not China to a lot of people but it gave me a taste of China so much that I've visited the Chinese mainland four times.

Have been to Beijing, Shanghai, Guilin, Yangshuo, Hangzhou, Suzhou and Huangsgan.

Other than Shanghai (which was where my brother was then living) the rest of the places was just me and my wife doing it under our own steam.

Quite an adventure, I can tell you.

One thing that really stayed with me were the overnight train journeys. Shanghai to Beijing was on a fast and gleaming bullet train. Shanghai to Anhui Province was an altogether different proposition and it was seated all the way. We got talking (if you can call it that) to a group of Chinese and with the aid of some alcohol and a pack of cards we had a great time.

I also loved the nickname that the Chinese give their long suffering peasantry. They call them "laobaixing" and it means "old hundred names". Quite evocative.

I experienced nothing but warmth and friendliness from the Chinese people I met; which is all the more remarkable given the treatment the western nations once dished out to them.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#5584 Apr 21, 2013
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
You're right about the Chinese taking the long-long view.
If we in the west take a long look back at history in our part of the world we'll see a natural pattern of civilisations and empires rising and falling. By 2000 BC Egypt had eclipsed Sumeria. Fast forward 1000 years to see Egypt on the decline set against the rise of Babylon. Then came the Persians who were surpassed by the Greeks and then the Romans. Most civilisations were supplanted by another although some were totally destroyed and pretty much vanished from history.
Moving forward in time we saw the rise and fall of the Italian city states, the Spanish Empire, the Hapsburg Empire and then the British Empire. Now it's your turn in America but even now most Americans accept that their dominance won't last.
Our civilisations/empires are transitory and while revolution and civil war occur less frequently these days, they were a major contributing factor to making us the people we are.
Now take a look at China and you'll see an altogether different pattern:
The idea of younger, stronger civilisations succeeding older ones does not exist. In China it's the yin-yang thing where their civilisation passes through reversals of direction from disorder to order and back to disorder. It's a society where there has never been a revolution with the impact of the French/Russian or other revolutions. No Magna Carta establishing people's rights. Sure there have been plenty of dynastic changes but each dynasty would eventually become rotten and would be replaced by another.
Those changes always took place at the top and whatever happened, the power remained in the hands of one emperor and his officials, it's been an unending cycle of power changes. Ok, the Chinese have had revolutions but they have never really led to changes in the system. In China the course of their civilisation is like a line of descent with dynasties and rulers linked together like father and son. Just think of everything we get from our parents and how we are shaped and influenced by them. That is how Chinese civilisation is.
The checks and balances on our governments that we in the west now take for granted are unheard of in China. After over 5000 years of the same cycles of government it would take a truly momentous effort to overthrow the Chinese system. If it ever happens it will be an achievement that will easily dwarf any of our revolutionary victories.
That is interesting. Seriously-- I had not really thought it through quite in that way, but you are right. Even now, under the euphemistic "communist" China, they've just change the names, but business as usual-- same story, different label--different day.

I suspect you are also correct that it'd take a major upheaval.

But the Internets is in China, even if restricted (but only somewhat--wireless and other holes in that wall exist).

And the Chinese people seem to have taken to the intertubes like a child takes to the beach-- with a great deal of enthusiasm.

And that exposure to cultures other than their own may well be the beginning of the change.

I don't know what the future will look like, but it'll have free exchange of ideas in it, like never before in history.

What that does to the various formerly isolated cultures (like China) I cannot say-- but it's bound to have an effect.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#5585 Apr 21, 2013
Khatru wrote:
I experienced nothing but warmth and friendliness from the Chinese people I met; which is all the more remarkable given the treatment the western nations once dished out to them.
My theory about that one is this: it's an old culture-- thousands of years older than most of the rest.

I think that age tends to teach it's people to be more mellow, than a brash, young one like the USA. By global standards, the US is just a child.

And it shows.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#5586 Apr 22, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
That is interesting. Seriously-- I had not really thought it through quite in that way, but you are right. Even now, under the euphemistic "communist" China, they've just change the names, but business as usual-- same story, different label--different day.
I suspect you are also correct that it'd take a major upheaval.
But the Internets is in China, even if restricted (but only somewhat--wireless and other holes in that wall exist).
And the Chinese people seem to have taken to the intertubes like a child takes to the beach-- with a great deal of enthusiasm.
And that exposure to cultures other than their own may well be the beginning of the change.
I don't know what the future will look like, but it'll have free exchange of ideas in it, like never before in history.
What that does to the various formerly isolated cultures (like China) I cannot say-- but it's bound to have an effect.
Mao once said that the Chinese people were a blank piece of paper for him to write socialism on. He was wrong on many levels. The paper was not blank. What about the years of dynastic history and culture? the Confucist teachings? Above all, what was wrong with letting the people write on the paper themselves?

If the paper wasn't blank when Mao started, it was certainly blank after he'd finished. An entire nation traumatised with (among other things) his Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution.

It is good to see the Chinese government embracing so many western ideals that,a few years ago, were anathema to them. Now they realise that their way was wrong. it's a big step in the right direction.

All we need now is for the people to take control and write on the page themselves.
Imhotep

United States

#5587 Apr 22, 2013
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
You're welcome!
If I was at school now, I'd want to learn Mandarin or Putonghua as it's known in China.
I spent five years in Hong Kong. Ok, I know that's not China to a lot of people but it gave me a taste of China so much that I've visited the Chinese mainland four times.
Have been to Beijing, Shanghai, Guilin, Yangshuo, Hangzhou, Suzhou and Huangsgan.
Other than Shanghai (which was where my brother was then living) the rest of the places was just me and my wife doing it under our own steam.
Quite an adventure, I can tell you.
One thing that really stayed with me were the overnight train journeys. Shanghai to Beijing was on a fast and gleaming bullet train. Shanghai to Anhui Province was an altogether different proposition and it was seated all the way. We got talking (if you can call it that) to a group of Chinese and with the aid of some alcohol and a pack of cards we had a great time.
I also loved the nickname that the Chinese give their long suffering peasantry. They call them "laobaixing" and it means "old hundred names". Quite evocative.
I experienced nothing but warmth and friendliness from the Chinese people I met; which is all the more remarkable given the treatment the western nations once dished out to them.
I have to say the same they are remarkable people very polite.

Is Mandarin the most dominant language or Cantonese?

My acquaintances speak both
What actually is the difference from your point of view

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#5588 Apr 22, 2013
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
Mao once said that the Chinese people were a blank piece of paper for him to write socialism on. He was wrong on many levels. The paper was not blank. What about the years of dynastic history and culture? the Confucist teachings? Above all, what was wrong with letting the people write on the paper themselves?
If the paper wasn't blank when Mao started, it was certainly blank after he'd finished. An entire nation traumatised with (among other things) his Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution.
It is good to see the Chinese government embracing so many western ideals that,a few years ago, were anathema to them. Now they realise that their way was wrong. it's a big step in the right direction.
All we need now is for the people to take control and write on the page themselves.
Interesting. I cannot add more to what you said, so I won't. But what you said is most interesting.

:)

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#5589 Apr 23, 2013
Imhotep wrote:
<quoted text>
I have to say the same they are remarkable people very polite.
Is Mandarin the most dominant language or Cantonese?
My acquaintances speak both
What actually is the difference from your point of view
Mandarin is more widely spoken and I can't tell the difference between it and Cantonese.

I'm told that Cantonese has nine tones as opposed to the four we see in Mandarin.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#5590 Apr 23, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting. I cannot add more to what you said, so I won't. But what you said is most interesting.
:)
Thanks!

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#5591 Apr 23, 2013
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
Mandarin is more widely spoken and I can't tell the difference between it and Cantonese.
I'm told that Cantonese has nine tones as opposed to the four we see in Mandarin.
So for us language-impaired Westerners, Mandarin would be the language of choice?

:)

I've always wanted to get a copy of The Rosetta Stone software; my theory is that Chinese may be the language of the future, just going by the world population figures.

;)
Thinking

Reading, UK

#5592 Apr 23, 2013
Maybe so, but "international chinese" will morph into an alphabet style language. Technology is driving this change.
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
So for us language-impaired Westerners, Mandarin would be the language of choice?
:)
I've always wanted to get a copy of The Rosetta Stone software; my theory is that Chinese may be the language of the future, just going by the world population figures.
;)

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#5593 Apr 23, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Maybe so, but "international chinese" will morph into an alphabet style language. Technology is driving this change.
<quoted text>
True, that. Already there's "simplified Chinese" as a near-character-type language, for use in software.

“Quantum Junctn: Use Both Lanes”

Since: Dec 06

Tulsa, Oklahoma USofA

#5594 Apr 23, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Maybe so, but "international chinese" will morph into an alphabet style language. Technology is driving this change.
<quoted text>
As soon as I hit "post", I had a notion-- the "simplified Chinese" was a pretty early development, software-wise. Back when memory was relatively scarce, and storage at a premium.

So it was adopted, as well as several similar Oriental language sets.

These days? The hardware has memory galore, and easily able to duplicate the complex graphics of the original Chinese.... but that early work has already driven the technology, so it's unlikely to go back to Traditional, apart from academic/historical situations.

“Right click Left click Yay!”

Since: Dec 10

Nehwon

#5595 Apr 23, 2013
James wrote:
<quoted text>
Thats because all they're really capable of is sitting around talking. Just like their ancestor monkeys. Monkeys probably sit around and talk about the same things: I'm a better monkey than you!, ooh ooh ... ahh ahhhh!
You seem to be well versed in monkey speak.

What's your opinion of "Jesus is Our Lord and Saviour! ooh ooh ahh ahhhh!" that's been repeated for a couple of thousands years?

“Right click Left click Yay!”

Since: Dec 10

Nehwon

#5596 Apr 23, 2013
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
That is an excellent observation-- you may well be right.
One thing that Chinese culture has over Western ones, is the Chinese recognize the value of taking the long-long view.
A philosophy that is an anathema to Capitalism, unfortunately.
It's a lesson I wish the US could learn, though.
When the Chinese become innovative, instead of copying, in the ways of killing, then I'll start to worry.

And even then, nuclear weapons is still a MAD card to play.

I think bigger fear is a reinstatement of the noble classes by means of wealth accumulation in a few hands. Instead of Divine Right of Kings and his appointed Dukes/Counts/Barons/etc... will we see something similar as Billionaire/100-999 millionaire/multi-millionaire?

A rose by any other name and all that.
Thinking

Reading, UK

#5597 Apr 24, 2013
It's the younger smartphone and tablet generation that really favour using an alphabet.
Bob of Quantum-Faith wrote:
<quoted text>
As soon as I hit "post", I had a notion-- the "simplified Chinese" was a pretty early development, software-wise. Back when memory was relatively scarce, and storage at a premium.
So it was adopted, as well as several similar Oriental language sets.
These days? The hardware has memory galore, and easily able to duplicate the complex graphics of the original Chinese.... but that early work has already driven the technology, so it's unlikely to go back to Traditional, apart from academic/historical situations.
Thinking

Reading, UK

#5598 Apr 24, 2013
Frankie Boyle, Scottish comedian, was asked the significance of 2025.

He said something similar to: "That's the year black and white people sit side by side in harmony... in Chinese death camps."
greymouser wrote:
<quoted text>
When the Chinese become innovative, instead of copying, in the ways of killing, then I'll start to worry.
And even then, nuclear weapons is still a MAD card to play.
I think bigger fear is a reinstatement of the noble classes by means of wealth accumulation in a few hands. Instead of Divine Right of Kings and his appointed Dukes/Counts/Barons/etc... will we see something similar as Billionaire/100-999 millionaire/multi-millionaire?
A rose by any other name and all that.

“Blue Collar Philosopher”

Since: Nov 08

Texas, USA

#5599 Apr 24, 2013
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
You're welcome!
If I was at school now, I'd want to learn Mandarin or Putonghua as it's known in China.
I spent five years in Hong Kong. Ok, I know that's not China to a lot of people but it gave me a taste of China so much that I've visited the Chinese mainland four times.
Have been to Beijing, Shanghai, Guilin, Yangshuo, Hangzhou, Suzhou and Huangsgan.
Other than Shanghai (which was where my brother was then living) the rest of the places was just me and my wife doing it under our own steam.
Quite an adventure, I can tell you.
One thing that really stayed with me were the overnight train journeys. Shanghai to Beijing was on a fast and gleaming bullet train. Shanghai to Anhui Province was an altogether different proposition and it was seated all the way. We got talking (if you can call it that) to a group of Chinese and with the aid of some alcohol and a pack of cards we had a great time.
I also loved the nickname that the Chinese give their long suffering peasantry. They call them "laobaixing" and it means "old hundred names". Quite evocative.
I experienced nothing but warmth and friendliness from the Chinese people I met; which is all the more remarkable given the treatment the western nations once dished out to them.
I made a single visit to China ... a service call to a seismic vessel leased to them in a 'joint venture'. I met the boat offshore Hainan Island. I was struck by their technology, everyone running around on their cellphones, the hustle and bustle and their joyous Karaoke parties in the hotel seemingly every night.

My trip to the seismic vessel was via a 'supply boat'. The ride out into the South China Sea took a couple hours. I was struck by a few things ... the poor condition of the deteriorating vessel, decks slick with grease, the rust, garbage tossed carelessly into the sea. I was grateful to see our beautiful, almost brand new, seismic boat on the horizon. Unfortunately, as we drew nearer, I could see the streams of rust running down her side. I had traveled out with an Engineer who was going to check the engines, which were not developing enough power to tow the acoustic array at the proper speed.

My heart sank further once on board. It was clear these were not American Sailors who take pride in their ship.'Chipping and painting' are constant maintenance tasks in the battle against a harsh environment and it was well on it's way to being lost. My travel companion reported that NO MAINTENANCE had been performed on the engines and they had accumulated carbon exhaust products almost to the point of destruction.

My point? Just this impression of a Socialist/Communist country ... some glitz and glitter on the outside with a dark, rusty underbelly. There is no 'pride of ownership' when everything is handed to you. I did find the people friendly and accommodating. I would have starved had it not been for fried rice ... the only 'Chinese Food' remotely like what we get in state-side restaurants. I ordered 'the chicken' one night at the hotel. I received a platter of nicely glazed chicken FEET. I figured the Party Elite got the rest of the chicken.
spudgun

Stoke-on-trent, UK

#5600 Apr 24, 2013
Thinking wrote:
Frankie Boyle, Scottish comedian, was asked the significance of 2025.
He said something similar to: "That's the year black and white people sit side by side in harmony... in Chinese death camps."
<quoted text>
Thats really weird, cause I was just watching him say that on Youtube earlier.

Frankie Boyle has a morbid sense of humour, but can be very funny.

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