Why do Americans still dislike atheists?

Why do Americans still dislike atheists?

There are 38669 comments on the www.washingtonpost.com story from Apr 30, 2011, titled Why do Americans still dislike atheists?. In it, www.washingtonpost.com reports that:

Long after blacks and Jews have made great strides, and even as homosexuals gain respect, acceptance and new rights, there is still a group that lots of Americans just don't like much: atheists.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.washingtonpost.com.

“Blue Collar Philosopher”

Since: Nov 08

Texas, USA

#22680 Sep 25, 2011
Karma is a_______ wrote:
<quoted text>
I was watching the military channel program about German Raiders. A similar document was captured by a German Raider (Atlantis) from a English ship (SS Automedon) it was an assessment of U.S. & English power in the Pacific...germans turned it over to Japan...it was quite similar to the one discussed here
The memorandum could well be authentic ... I really don't know. Who does? Mike_Lee? I think not. The document Mike posted does not strike me as so much a power assessment (number of ships, planes, subs, bases, soldiers, sailors and airmen) as a bogus document designed to shift "blame" for Pearl Harbor off the Japs and onto US!

Setting somewhere are dusty documents detailing every possible nuclear war scenario and our various planned responses. Does that mean we WANTED nuclear war ... of course not. Was Pearl Harbor an anticipated Japanese response to our various diplomatic rebukes and saber rattling? Maybe. Is that possibility more or less plausible than Japan simply wanting to nullify our Pacific Fleet until it had secured their new won territories?

“Blue Collar Philosopher”

Since: Nov 08

Texas, USA

#22681 Sep 25, 2011
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>Weren't they vulnerable to air attack only AFTER we destroyed the japanese air force?
That was my line of thinking. We were quite shocked with how GOOD the Japanese aircraft after we first engaged them. On the other hand, until we met them in combat, we grossly underestimated their capabilities. It is interesting to think about but I just do see saying "the USA started the war with Japan" based on what I've seen so far. There's so much intrigue, back stabbing, lies and misinformation in politics though, anything is possible.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#22682 Sep 25, 2011
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
Why don't you show the forum where I "assessed" the UK to be secular when I have *declared* the UK to be NOT secular about fifty times?
Or are you just going to threaten to "quote" me which... funny enough... you never manage to actually do?
No, because that quote of mine you just cited was a typo.

Anyway, you want me to quote you? Ok, I will and I'll also provide the link for folks to see for themselves.

http://www.topix.com/forum/religion/atheism/T...

In response to greymouser who had questioned how secular the USA is by having a government holiday on Christmas Day, you said...
barefoot2626 wrote:
Putting aside, of course, the secular nature of Christmas as it happens on the ground in the real world in the US.
In other words, because it suited you to do so, you expanded your definition of secular to include what happens out there on the ground and not just limit it to governmental rules.

Anyway, my response was here.....

http://www.topix.com/forum/religion/atheism/T...
Khatru wrote:
And in a stroke of irony which I'm sure you won't get, you show your hypocrisy for all to see.

What you're saying is that although the government have a statutory holiday for Christmas the reality is what happens out on the street and in society at large is what makes it secular?

Which, wetpants, is exactly what I'm saying happens in the UK when you parrot your usual stuff about state religions and a miniscule number of church-appointed Lords.
Go on then, share with us why you suddenly flip-flopped to a broader basis for assessing secularism to your usual blinkered viewpoint.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#22683 Sep 25, 2011
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
Since 'state' is fifty percent of the term 'secular state' I put some importance on it.
Semantics.

It's fifty percent of two words.

You want to know if Egypt is secular? You'll have to look beyond its government to what's happening out there in Egyptian society.

Something you seem unable to do for the USA and UK.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22685 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
No, because that quote of mine you just cited was a typo.
blah blah blah.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#22686 Sep 25, 2011
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
You mean like I keep reminding you that the state declares a state religion, that the head of state is the head of state religion, that the state religion appoints members to the state parliament, that the taxpayers in that state pay to keep up the state religion, and the state enforces religious indoctrination in public schools...
That "small" area? yes...
And then I remind you that that doesn't happen in the US and we have constitutional protection to keep it from happening, yes...
And then I remind you that a census of 60 million subjects that reflects a religious population with the same percentage of the USA is more accurate than you survey of less than three thousand...subjects...
Other than that...
Other than that Christianity is far, far stronger in the USA than it is in the UK. Putting aside, of course, the secular nature of everyday society as it happens on the ground in the real world in the UK

Proving that purporting to be a secular stare and actually being one are two quite different things.

Any country that was supposedly founded on separation of church and state yet gradually introduces the Christian god into its proceedings is not secular.

The Pledge Of Allegiance

About 180 years after their nation was founded the USA amended the words of their Pledge of Allegiance so that they read "One nation under God". I guess it was felt by the powers that be (and still is) that the nation needed a shot of Christianity.

In God We Trust

Shortly after the US declared themselves to be under God they adopted "In God We Trust" as their US motto. It must have been felt that changing the Pledge of Allegiance wasn't enough and more Christianity was needed. Hence the declaration that the USA places its trust in the god of the Bible.

National Day Of Prayer

A few years earlier and by statutory enactment, the USA created the National Day Of Prayer. On this day and by legal requirement, the President leads the nation in prayer. Secular you say? Right.

Stem Cell Research

The Bush Government withdrew funding for this science for no other reason than it contradicted Christian dogma.

I could go on from biblical references on US Army gun sights...

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondea...

to Presidential hopeful Rick Perry mixing politics and religion "The Response"....

http://blog.au.org/2011/08/19/%E2%80%98the-re...

to churches that endorse republican candidates at election time...

http://www.au.org/media/press-releases/archiv...

and schools that make it difficult for students wishing to form atheist and secular clubs....

http://www.au.org/media/church-and-state/arch...

To the lack of secular based rehab options for prisoners in US prisons...

http://www.au.org/media/church-and-state/arch...

You may lay claim to being secular in your constitution, however out on the street and in society at large - Christianity has worked its way into the nooks and crannies of everyday American life.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22687 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
In other words,
In other words: I state my position with perfect clarity, and you in your typical fashion decide what I said ** exactly** doesn't suit your agenda, and you paraphrase it into something you can then attack.

Readers: do notice how I do not find the need to rephrase *anything* KowKow has to say, I provide the *exact* quote, I do not find the need to rephrase anything so you, the readers, can "better understand"... nor have I *ever* had to make up a quote- as KowKow has done.

Christmas- in the US- is for the most part a secular holiday.

And of course Christmas is a holiday in the UK.

As is Good Fridays and Easter Mondays.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22688 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
Semantics.
It's fifty percent of two words.
You want to know if Egypt is secular?
I don't care one way or the other, particularly since there is not really as of this minute a "real" Egyptian government.

I do understand why you keep wanting to pull it away from the UK, though.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22689 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
The Pledge Of Allegiance
Don't care. There is no requirement for anyone to recite the pledge and many people don't.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#22690 Sep 25, 2011
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
blah blah blah.
What's up?

I present you with proof of your hypocrisy and you ignore it.

Looks like I was right, eh?

Thereby, fully justifying my decision not to give you the proof that your tax dollars funding the production of religious TV programmes.

Better carry on running away from the proof, wetpants. It's one thing you do well.

Your credibility has been torn to shreds.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22691 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
Proving that purporting to be a secular stare and actually being one are two quite different things.
What I "stare" at is the official state religion of the UK and then I look at the US Constitution (right... the *subjects* of the British monarchy have nothing to come that to...) and when I look at the definition of the term "secular state" I know only a bald faced liar who has lost an argument would pretend the UK is a secular state.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22692 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
to churches that endorse republican candidates at election time...
Over here in the USA, we have freedom of religion and this freedom allows people of all religions to endorse political candidates.

Let's compare this freedom to what they have over in the UK:

A state church that *****APPOINTS**** people to public office including the House of Lords ('our' Senate).

GEE>>>> in which state is the church is more intrusive? the state that prohibits this, or the state that allows ***ONE*** church to appoint members to the Parliament.

Maybe that would be a good poll question...

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22693 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
I present you with proof of your hypocrisy and you ignore it.
Looks like I was right, eh?
Or it looks like I just ignored it...

PS: as I have pointed out before: because I do not respond to something (or anything) you post- as much as your inflated ego may allow you to think so-- I am not conceding a thing.

Sometimes I am just putting clapboards on the side of the house while it isn't raining.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22694 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
Other than that Christianity is far, far stronger in the USA than it is in the UK.
Not according to the UK census of 60 million which indicates the percentages of people who call themselves Christians are about the same in both countries.

Yes, I know you like to pretend the biased poll of less than 3,000 people is more accurate .

COUGH!

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22695 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
and schools that make it difficult for students wishing to form atheist and secular clubs....
Compare to the UK which **** R E Q U I R E S**** collective worship in public school. HAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAH!

It is hard to take you seriously.

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#22696 Sep 25, 2011
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
What I "stare" at is the official state religion of the UK and then I look at the US Constitution (right... the *subjects* of the British monarchy have nothing to come that to...) and when I look at the definition of the term "secular state" I know only a bald faced liar who has lost an argument would pretend the UK is a secular state.
I also know that only an obsessive, argumentative troll would labour such a futile and pointless position when nobody cares and that the USA is far more religious than the UK.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22697 Sep 25, 2011
PS: When students have problem (any problems) creating such "clubs"- and there are hundreds of such clubs around the USA - they need only clear their throat with a letter to the school administrators threatening lawsuit.

Happy to see any such club banned from meeting in a public school being upheld by US court.

PS: Funny how you skipped over those same problems in the UK... and that so far the UK has two dozen such clubs...

When these clubs (if they were forced to take it to court) point to the first amendment of the US Constitution where in the UK they point to....

Oh... right... the UK has subjects, not citizens... and their subjects do not have a constitution...

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22698 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
<quoted text>
I also know that only an obsessive, argumentative troll would labour such a futile and pointless position
Funny how you are still here and you are insisting the UK is not a secular state even though you were proved wrong two months ago.

(quote)
A secular state is a concept of secularism, whereby a state or country purports to be officially neutral in matters of religion, supporting neither religion nor irreligion....

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_state

++

Funny how you still are unable to find a definition of secular state to support your position yet after two months you continue to flail... with these ad hominem remarks, eh, DrippyDrawers?

Since: Apr 08

Nottingham, UK

#22699 Sep 25, 2011
barefoot2626 wrote:
<quoted text>
Over here in the USA, we have freedom of religion and this freedom allows people of all religions to endorse political candidates.
Let's compare this freedom to what they have over in the UK:
A state church that *****APPOINTS**** people to public office including the House of Lords ('our' Senate).
GEE>>>> in which state is the church is more intrusive? the state that prohibits this, or the state that allows ***ONE*** church to appoint members to the Parliament.
Maybe that would be a good poll question...
Try taking your blinkers off and looking beyond the dying vestiges of pomp, ceremony and silliness when looking at what is/isn't secular. You may make some progress.

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#22700 Sep 25, 2011
Khatru wrote:
Your credibility has been torn to shreds.
I still hold the definition of "secular state" in both hands and haven't budged an inch from it.

You continue to pretend a that a state can declare one religion to be above above all others and still be a secular state.

I am not worried about my credibility HAHAHAHAHAHA!

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