Noah's flood real

Posted in the Atheism Forum

Comments (Page 123)

Showing posts 2,441 - 2,460 of4,533
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
Thinking

Staines, UK

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2628
Mar 1, 2013
 
[pi]
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
Not
Having fun with this silly stuff?
Just list Pi

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2629
Mar 1, 2013
 
Thinking wrote:
<quoted text>[pi]
I'll make it easy for this little one.

Is Pi an odd or even number?

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2630
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
I'll make it easy for this little one.
Is Pi an odd or even number?
No. It is not an integer. In fact, it is an irrational number.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2631
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
Again not listing it all.
In fact you left an infinite number off.
Just like my 3.
No, I included that when I said it is the *infinite* sum.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2632
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
List the number Pi not an equation.
You do know the number that is Pi?
Real numbers are *defined* as limits of rational numbers. I gave one particular limit (an infinite sum) that gives pi.
Yes, pi is an irrational number given by the infinite sum
4*(1 - 1/3 + 1/5 - 1/7 + 1/9 - 1/11 +...)
That infinite sum is exactly pi.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2633
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
I'll make it easy for this little one.
Is Pi an odd or even number?
Do you mistakenly think that every number is either even or odd? Well, you are wrong. Every *integer* is either even of odd, but non-integers are neither. For example, 1/3 is not even nor is it odd. Neither is 1/10.
Pi is an irrational number, so it cannot even be written as a quotient of two integers (like 1/3 can). Even more so, it is not the root of any polynomial with integer coefficients (we say it is transcendental).
Perhaps you should learn some basic math.

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2634
Mar 1, 2013
 
polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>No. It is not an integer. In fact, it is an irrational number.
No kidding.

News flash I know Pi !

It is you and your clan that claim you can't round it off.

I would love to see the number you use for Pi with out any rounding off.

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2635
Mar 1, 2013
 
polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>No, I included that when I said it is the *infinite* sum.
As well as I did when I said I'm round off to a whole number.

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2636
Mar 1, 2013
 
polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>Real numbers are *defined* as limits of rational numbers. I gave one particular limit (an infinite sum) that gives pi.
Yes, pi is an irrational number given by the infinite sum
4*(1 - 1/3 + 1/5 - 1/7 + 1/9 - 1/11 +...)
That infinite sum is exactly pi.
You're not listing all of your figures.
This would be acceptable if you hadn't made the claim more less that no one else is allowed to round off Pi.

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2637
Mar 1, 2013
 
polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>Do you mistakenly think that every number is either even or odd? Well, you are wrong. Every *integer* is either even of odd, but non-integers are neither. For example, 1/3 is not even nor is it odd. Neither is 1/10.
Pi is an irrational number, so it cannot even be written as a quotient of two integers (like 1/3 can). Even more so, it is not the root of any polynomial with integer coefficients (we say it is transcendental).
Perhaps you should learn some basic math.
Every integer can be covered to decimal. Except one.

What this never occurred to you?

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2638
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
No kidding.
News flash I know Pi !
It is you and your clan that claim you can't round it off.
I would love to see the number you use for Pi with out any rounding off.
I generally just use the symbol pi.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2639
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
Every integer can be covered to decimal. Except one.
What this never occurred to you?
I'm curious what you think the exception is.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2640
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
You're not listing all of your figures.
This would be acceptable if you hadn't made the claim more less that no one else is allowed to round off Pi.
When did I say that? But, if you round off, you won't get the exact value.

But the exact value of pi is not required to answer the following question:

If a vat is 10 cubits across, how many cubits is it around? You can round off your answer to the nearest integer if you want.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2641
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
No kidding.
News flash I know Pi !
It is you and your clan that claim you can't round it off.
No, I am saying that rounding off inevitably produces an error into the calculation. The amount of error is determined by the amount you round off.

So, if a vat is 10 cubits across (diameter), how many cubits will it be around (circumference)? You may round off to the nearest integer if you wish.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2642
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
As well as I did when I said I'm round off to a whole number.
How much error is produced when you do this? In particular, if the diameter of a vat is 10 cubits, what is the error produced in the calculation of the circumference when you round pi t the nearest whole number?

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2643
Mar 1, 2013
 
polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>I generally just use the symbol pi.
As do most, while this works for writing down the equation. What number do use when calculating?

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2644
Mar 1, 2013
 

Judged:

1

polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>I'm curious what you think the exception is.
Pi

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2645
Mar 1, 2013
 

Judged:

1

polymath257 wrote:
<quoted text>When did I say that? But, if you round off, you won't get the exact value.

But the exact value of pi is not required to answer the following question:

If a vat is 10 cubits across, how many cubits is it around? You can round off your answer to the nearest integer if you want.
"When did I say that? But, if you round off, you won't get the exact value. "

Oh that's so critical when you're measuring using a Cubit! Finger tip to elbow.

Hey Fred double check my measurements before I cut this board!

Hey bubba you're off by 1/64 of a cubit!

LOL

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2646
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
As do most, while this works for writing down the equation. What number do use when calculating?
It depends on how much accuracy I want.

“Think&Care”

Since: Oct 07

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2647
Mar 1, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
<quoted text>
Pi
Pi isn't an integer.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 2,441 - 2,460 of4,533
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••
•••
•••
•••