Don't let atheists grow in influence

Don't let atheists grow in influence

There are 212 comments on the This Is Staffordshire story from Oct 11, 2013, titled Don't let atheists grow in influence. In it, This Is Staffordshire reports that:

Why, when people are arguing that we should not 'bow to religion', are we creating new rules for another religion that of atheism? The definition of a religion or faith is a belief in the existence or non-existence of God in the absolute absence of corroborative scientific evidence.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at This Is Staffordshire.

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susanblange

Norfolk, VA

#229 Nov 18, 2013
Amused wrote:
<quoted text>
He's not *our* satan. The talking snake and all other incarnations of satan are part of your mythology. There's no more evidence for the existence of satan than for the existence of god.
I'm afraid I can't become an "upstanding christian". My information is that they make you lay down when they perform a lobotomy, not stand up.
Satan is Adam and he's been reincarnated as the Messiahs' father. The serpent was a part of Adams anatomy and it "speaking" was not literal, it was symbolic. Most of the story in the garden of Eden is allegorical. When Adam died and went to heaven, his name was changed to Satan. He went to heaven to preserve his life, to be reincarnated and to bring Messiah/God into the world. He's the only one who could genetically do this. He was the son of God and in this life is the father of God. He is responsible for the "crucifixion" and will be punished and executed for it. Isaiah 27:1. He is called "leviathan the piercing serpent"
susanblange

Norfolk, VA

#230 Nov 18, 2013
emperorjohn wrote:
<quoted text>
No cheesecake, no cereal, no ice cream-I prefer hell.
Angels will inherit and inhabit the earth. Zechariah 14:5 "...and the Lord my God shall come, and all the saints with thee". I think Angels will resume their lives as they left them. We don't know what our bodies will be like, we'll have to wait and see. I do know there will be no physical imperfections. If you're blind, you'll see; if you're deaf, you hear; if you're paralyzed, you're restored; and if you're missing members, you're made whole.

“Citizen_Patriot_ Voter_Atheist!”

Since: May 09

Earth,TX

#231 Nov 18, 2013
susanblange wrote:
<quoted text>Satan is Adam and he's been reincarnated as the Messiahs' father. The serpent was a part of Adams anatomy and it "speaking" was not literal, it was symbolic. Most of the story in the garden of Eden is allegorical. When Adam died and went to heaven, his name was changed to Satan. He went to heaven to preserve his life, to be reincarnated and to bring Messiah/God into the world. He's the only one who could genetically do this. He was the son of God and in this life is the father of God. He is responsible for the "crucifixion" and will be punished and executed for it. Isaiah 27:1. He is called "leviathan the piercing serpent"
Poe.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#236 Nov 18, 2013
One of the worst mistakes you can make in life is to attach your identity to any particular religion or philosophy, such as by saying “I am a Christian” or “I am a Buddhist.” This forces your mind into a fixed perspective, robbing you of spiritual depth perception and savagely curtailing your ability to perceive reality accurately. If that sounds like a good idea to you, you’ll probably want to gouge out one of your eyeballs too. Surely you’ll be better off with a single, fixed perspective instead of having to consider two separate image streams… unless of course you’ve become attached to stereo vision.
Siro wrote:
The title of the thread is "Don't let atheists grow in influence"
Well theres no need to worry about that.....because atheists grow in toilets...
Patrick n Angela

Pompano Beach, FL

#237 Mar 23, 2015
Many atheist are agnostics and the movement is not growing in size in England or the United States. No atheists served in the US Congress.
England has an established Christian Church

Atheists are good people, concerned with the betterment of mankind, and usually friends with believers in this endeavor.

Atheists and Christians are good friends... except on threads :-)
Patrick n Angela

Pompano Beach, FL

#238 Mar 23, 2015
In the News

By Meredith Somers - The Washington Times - Monday, May 5, 2014
A New York town’s practice of opening its government meetings with a prayer does not violate the constitutional separation of church and state, a sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday, in a decision that both sides said could signal a major shift in the role of religion in the public square.

The case of Town of Greece v. Galloway, argued late last year, was considered one of the biggest religious freedom cases of the term. Swing-vote Justice Anthony M. Kennedy joined the court’s four more conservative members in the 5-4 decision in favor of the town.

The decision reversed the ruling of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, which held that Greece officials were endorsing Christianity and thus violating the Constitution’s Establishment Clause barring the government from favoring one religion or faith. The “chaplain of the month” at town meetings was almost always Christian and two residents sued, saying the prayers made them feel excluded from the proceedings.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/may/...
thetruth

London, UK

#239 Mar 24, 2015
Patrick n Angela wrote:
Many atheist are agnostics and the movement is not growing in size in England or the United States. No atheists served in the US Congress.
England has an established Christian Church
Atheists are good people, concerned with the betterment of mankind, and usually friends with believers in this endeavor.
Atheists and Christians are good friends... except on threads :-)
Propoganda Weekly makes another unwelcome return.
Patrick n Angela

Pompano Beach, FL

#240 Mar 24, 2015
In the News

From Dr. Borg’s blog on Patheos: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/marcusborg/

A great change has occurred in the rituals, formal and informal, surrounding dying and death in North America. Here and in other contemporary western cultures, our customary practices around dying and death, have changed dramatically. For millennia, both were part of the familiar fabric of human experience. But no longer.

There is more than one reason. Life expectancy was much lower. As recently as 1900 in the United States, it was 45 years. Infant and children mortality rates were high. Of my paternal grandparents’ ten children, three died before adulthood. Mortality rates in childbirth were also high.

Most people died at home, not in a hospital. Thus almost everybody would have experienced a death before they were adults. Depending upon their age, children would have been involved in the care of a dying person and likely present at their death.

After death, the body was not removed to a funeral home. Rather, the family was responsible for preparing the corpse for washing and dressing it for burial. The wake would also be in the home, commonly in the parlor. Hence the names “funeral home” and “funeral parlor” for the enterprises that now perform that role in our customs around death.

These developments are not simply regrettable. Though modern medicine has mostly removed the place of death to hospitals, it is welcomed by most of us. So are the services of funeral directors, funeral homes, cemeteries and crematoria. Most of us have no idea what to do with a corpse. But the removal of dying and death from home and family to institutions has created a huge change in our intimacy with death.

Consider the good death in pre-modern Europe, the ideal death, the beautiful death, as described by cultural historian Philippe Aries in The Hour of Our Death. Because Europe was then Christian, it is also a pre-modern Christian way of death. Its central features included dying at home, surrounded by family and friends, with final lamentations, good-byes and blessings. Presided over by the church, it also included confession of sins, absolution, a final eucharist and extreme unction. And then a silent wait for the gradual but ideally quick descent into death. The dying person experienced it. Family and friends experienced it.

How often death happened in this idealized way and how this ideal was shaped by social class remains debated. Did most die this way? Or was this an ideal and not convention? But it is sharply different from how we experience dying and death. Our ancestors of whatever social class were familiar with death in ways that we are not.

The change has led some cultural commentators to argue that America and other modern societies have become death-denying cultures. The claim needs some explanation.

It does not mean that we are intellectually ignorant that we will die. Few of us would get that wrong on a true-false test. Moreover, we are visually (if not viscerally) more aware of death than any generation prior to us. The news is full of it. Headlines highlight death and the threat of death: natural catastrophes, wars, terrorism, plane crashes, Ebola, the perils of artificial turf, to mention a few recent ones. Video games (though I do not know them firsthand) are filled with killing and death. So are many movies. I have heard that the average American child sees over 20,000 video deaths by adulthood.
thetruth

London, UK

#241 Mar 24, 2015
Patrick n Angela wrote:
In the News
From Dr. Borg’s blog on Patheos: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/marcusborg/
A great change has occurred in the rituals, formal and informal, surrounding dying and death in North America. Here and in other contemporary western cultures, our customary practices around dying and death, have changed dramatically. For millennia, both were part of the familiar fabric of human experience. But no longer.
There is more than one reason. Life expectancy was much lower. As recently as 1900 in the United States, it was 45 years. Infant and children mortality rates were high. Of my paternal grandparents’ ten children, three died before adulthood. Mortality rates in childbirth were also high.
Most people died at home, not in a hospital. Thus almost everybody would have experienced a death before they were adults. Depending upon their age, children would have been involved in the care of a dying person and likely present at their death.
After death, the body was not removed to a funeral home. Rather, the family was responsible for preparing the corpse for washing and dressing it for burial. The wake would also be in the home, commonly in the parlor. Hence the names “funeral home” and “funeral parlor” for the enterprises that now perform that role in our customs around death.
These developments are not simply regrettable. Though modern medicine has mostly removed the place of death to hospitals, it is welcomed by most of us. So are the services of funeral directors, funeral homes, cemeteries and crematoria. Most of us have no idea what to do with a corpse. But the removal of dying and death from home and family to institutions has created a huge change in our intimacy with death.
Consider the good death in pre-modern Europe, the ideal death, the beautiful death, as described by cultural historian Philippe Aries in The Hour of Our Death. Because Europe was then Christian, it is also a pre-modern Christian way of death. Its central features included dying at home, surrounded by family and friends, with final lamentations, good-byes and blessings. Presided over by the church, it also included confession of sins, absolution, a final eucharist and extreme unction. And then a silent wait for the gradual but ideally quick descent into death. The dying person experienced it. Family and friends experienced it.
How often death happened in this idealized way and how this ideal was shaped by social class remains debated. Did most die this way? Or was this an ideal and not convention? But it is sharply different from how we experience dying and death. Our ancestors of whatever social class were familiar with death in ways that we are not.
The change has led some cultural commentators to argue that America and other modern societies have become death-denying cultures. The claim needs some explanation.
It does not mean that we are intellectually ignorant that we will die. Few of us would get that wrong on a true-false test. Moreover, we are visually (if not viscerally) more aware of death than any generation prior to us. The news is full of it. Headlines highlight death and the threat of death: natural catastrophes, wars, terrorism, plane crashes, Ebola, the perils of artificial turf, to mention a few recent ones. Video games (though I do not know them firsthand) are filled with killing and death. So are many movies. I have heard that the average American child sees over 20,000 video deaths by adulthood.
Its amusing how you just sh*t this stuff right out when you are butthurt.
Patrick n Angela

Pompano Beach, FL

#242 Mar 25, 2015
Interesting Churches of England

http://www.westminstercathedral.org.uk/art_hi...

History of the Cathedral

The Nave
A Brief History
The Cathedral site was originally known as Bulinga Fen and formed part of the marsh around Westminster. It was reclaimed by the Benedictine monks who were the builders and owners of Westminster Abbey, and subsequently used as a market and fairground. After the reformation the land was used in turn as a maze, a pleasure garden and as a ring for bull-baiting but it remained largely waste ground.

In the 17th century a part of the land was sold by the Abbey for the construction of a prison which was demolished and replaced by an enlarged prison complex in 1834. The site was acquired by the Catholic Church in 1884.

The Cathedral Church of Westminster, which is dedicated to the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, was designed in the Early Christian Byzantine style by the Victorian architect John Francis Bentley. The foundation stone was laid in 1895 and the fabric of the building was completed eight years later.

The awesome interior of the Cathedral, although incomplete, contains fine marble-work and mosaics. The fourteen Stations of the Cross, by the sculptor Eric Gill, are world renowned.
thetruth

London, UK

#243 Mar 26, 2015
Patrick n Angela wrote:
Interesting Churches of England
http://www.westminstercathedral.org.uk/art_hi...
History of the Cathedral
The Nave
A Brief History
The Cathedral site was originally known as Bulinga Fen and formed part of the marsh around Westminster. It was reclaimed by the Benedictine monks who were the builders and owners of Westminster Abbey, and subsequently used as a market and fairground. After the reformation the land was used in turn as a maze, a pleasure garden and as a ring for bull-baiting but it remained largely waste ground.
In the 17th century a part of the land was sold by the Abbey for the construction of a prison which was demolished and replaced by an enlarged prison complex in 1834. The site was acquired by the Catholic Church in 1884.
The Cathedral Church of Westminster, which is dedicated to the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, was designed in the Early Christian Byzantine style by the Victorian architect John Francis Bentley. The foundation stone was laid in 1895 and the fabric of the building was completed eight years later.
The awesome interior of the Cathedral, although incomplete, contains fine marble-work and mosaics. The fourteen Stations of the Cross, by the sculptor Eric Gill, are world renowned.
1 simple line from an Atheist smacks down 10 paragraphs from a rambling Creationist liar, any day of the week.

“Citizen_Patriot_ Voter_Atheist!”

Since: May 09

Earth,TX

#244 Mar 29, 2015
thetruth wrote:
<quoted text>
1 simple line from an Atheist smacks down 10 paragraphs from a rambling Creationist liar, any day of the week.
LOL! Every day of the week.

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